Rajiv gandhi university of health sciences, bangalore, karnataka



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RAJIV GANDHI UNIVERSITY OF HEALTH SCIENCES,

BANGALORE, KARNATAKA.

ANNEXURE – II

PROFORMA FOR REGISTRATION OF SUBJECTS FOR DISSERTATION







1.


NAME OF THE CANDIDATE AND ADDRESS

(In Block Letters)

DR. RUCHIKA MISHRA



POST GRADUATE STUDENT,

DEPARTMENT OF PROSTHODONTICS,

BAPUJI DENTAL COLLEGE AND HOSPITAL, DAVANAGERE – 577 004,

KARNATAKA.










2.


NAME OF THE INSTITUTION

BAPUJI DENTAL COLLEGE AND HOSPITAL,

DAVANAGERE - 577 004.









3.


COURSE OF THE STUDY AND SUBJECT

MASTER OF DENTAL SURGERY

IN PROSTHODONTICS INCLUDING CROWN AND BRIDGE AND IMPLANTOLOGY.









4.


DATE OF ADMISSION TO COURSE

07-03-2009










5.

TITLE OF THE TOPIC


EFFECT OF MISSING OR MALPOSED CANINE ON POSTERIOR ATTRITION – A COMPARATIVE STUDY.”











6.

BRIEF RESUME OF THE INTENDED WORK:


6.1: Need for the study:

The occlusion scheme in humans has been classified into 2 major categories; Canine protected and group function. Canine protection has been defined as in lateral movement; there is immediate disclusion of all teeth except the maxillary canine and its antagonist. Group function is defined as, in lateral movement, two or more teeth are in occlusion even when the cusp tips are reached.1 Balanced occlusion can be seen only in complete dentures unless there is severe attrition in natural teeth.

Canine protected occlusion is commonly seen as compared to group function in dentate patients where all the teeth will be disoccluded except canine in any excursive movements. Canine is considered nature’s normal stress breaker and should not lock the teeth in centric relation as injury can occur to the cortical plate and possible bruxism.2 The canine protected occlusion has significantly lower mean periodontal disease index scores than group function.1 Some investigators have concluded that, because of lack of protective proprioceptive mechanism, canine is not able to transfer stresses to other teeth and would transform the canine guided occlusion into group function due to wearing of canine.1,2

In routine practice, we often come across patients with either missing or malposed canine. Hence an in-vivo study has been intended to compare the effect of missing or malposed canine on posterior attrition.













6.2: Review of Literature:

A study was done to compare the mean mobility of teeth in a group function type of occlusion and the mean mobility of teeth in a cuspid protected occlusion and it was concluded that the mean mobility of the each type of teeth was higher in the presence of a cuspid protected occlusal pattern. The results were statistically significant for the maxillary first premolar, first molar and the overall mean of the seven tooth types studied.3

A study was done on tooth loading and cuspal guidance in canine and group function occlusion showed that, canine guidance and group function guidance occlusion are considered normal; the latter occurs naturally due to occlusal wear. When entire occlusion is to be restored either of the occlusal schemes will serve adequately and where only a portion of the occlusion is to be restored, the restoration must be consistent with the existing occlusal scheme. Finally the study concluded that regardless of the occlusal scheme used the dentist must maintain it during the regular post operative appointments.2

A study was done to determine if there was a relation between the patterns of disclusion and a periodontal disease index. And concluded that mouths having canine-protected occlusion had significantly lower mean periodontal disease index scores than the mouths having progressive disclusion or group function. Also the canine and the molars in the canine-protected group exhibited lower mean periodontal disease index scores than their counterparts in the progressive disclusion or group function categories.1








A study was conducted to know the influence of group function and canine guidance on electromyographic activity of elevator muscles and it was found that the laterotrusive position with canine guidance produces significantly lower elevator muscle activity when compared with group function.4



A study assessed the use of canine protection and group function in classifying occlusal guidance in the natural dentition and concluded that focusing on the working-side contact only, most contact patterns belonged to group function and a few to canine protection. And while focusing on both the working and non working side contacts, nearly half the contact patterns were those other than canine protection and group function and were classified into balanced occlusion.5
6. 3 Objective of the study :

To compare the attrition and occlusal wear facets between the patients with missing or malposed canine and patients with normal complement of teeth.











7.




MATERIALS AND METHOD :

7.1: Source of data :

A total of 60 patients will be taken for the study which will be selected from patients attending OPD in Bapuji dental college and hospital, Davangere.



7.2 : Method of collection of data:

The sample of 60 shall be divided into two groups;

Group 1:- Will include 30 patients with missing or malposed canine.

Group 2 :-Will include 30patients with normal complement of teeth and will serve as control group.



Criteria for selecting patients for group 1:

  1. Patient with missing or malposed canine.

  2. All patients belonging to the age group 25-40 years.

  3. Patients without cuspid protected occlusion.

  4. Presence of all teeth excluding third molars.

  5. Overjet and overbite should not be more than 2-3 mm.

  6. No history of previous orthodontic treatment.

  7. No history of previous dental treatment.

  8. No history of previous craniofacial-surgery/trauma.

  9. No signs and symptoms of tempomandibular disorder, facial assymmetries and congenital facial defect.

  10. No occlusal discrepancies in centric occlusion.

  11. No history of parafunctional habits and bruxism.













Criteria for selecting patients for group 2:

  1. Patient with normal component of teeth.

  2. All patients belonging to the age group 25-40 years.

  3. Patients with cuspid protected occlusion.

  4. Presence of all teeth excluding third molars.

  5. Overjet and overbite should not be more than 2-3 mm.

  6. No history of previous orthodontic treatment.

  7. No history of previous dental treatment.

  8. No history of previous craniofacial-surgery/trauma.

  9. No signs and symptoms of tempomandibular disorder, facial assymmetries and congenital facial defect.

  10. No occlusal discrepancies in centric occlusion.

  11. No history of parafunctional habits and bruxism.

Method of study:

Subjects will be selected from group of healthy people. The subjects will be carefully screened to ensure that they have a high state of gingival health and no loss of alveolar bone support. A Modified Tooth Wear Index, 6 which is a six-point ordinal scale will be used to assess the attrition wear both the groups. Only those subjects who will give a signed inform consent will participate in the study.



Statistical analysis :

Results will be subjected for statistical analysis since the assessment is done on score bases, non-parametric methods will be used for analysis. KrusKal-wall ANOVA will be used for multiple group comparison followed by Mann- Whitney test for group wise comparison.










8.

7.3: Does the study require any investigation or interventions to be conducted on patients or other humans or animals? If so, please describe briefly

YES

Attrition and occlusal wear facets will be examined in patients with missing or malposed canine and in patients with normal complement of teeth, using “modified tooth wear index”.



7.4: Has ethical clearance been obtained from your institution in case of 7.3?

YES, Ethical clearance certificate is attached.



LIST OF REFERENCES:

  1. Goldstein G. The relationship of canine-protected occlusion to a periodontal index. J Prosthet Dent 1979; 41:277-83.

  2. Mcadam BD. Tooth loading and cuspal guidance in canine and group function occlusion. J Prosthet Dent 1976; 35:283-90.

  3. O’Leary, Shanley DB, Drake RB. Tooth mobility in cuspid-protected and group-function occlusions. J Prosthet Dent 1972; 27(1):21-25.

  4. Manns A, Chan C, Miralles R. Influence of group function and canine guidance on electromyographic activity of elevator muscles. J Prosthet Dent 1987; 57(4):494-500.

  5. Ogawa T, Ogimoto T, Koyano K. Pattern of occlusal contacts in lateral positions: Canine protection and group function validity in classifying guidance patterns. J Prosthet Dent 1998; 80:67-74.

  6. Donachie MA, Walls AWG. The tooth wear index: a flawed epidemiological tool in an ageing population group. Community Dent Oral Epidemiol 1996; 24:152-8.





9.



SIGNATURE OF THE CANDIDATE








10.


REMARKS OF THE GUIDE







11.

NAME & DESIGNATION OF

(IN BLOCK LETTERS)

11.1 GUIDE


DR.GAUTAM SHETTYMDS

PROFESSOR,


DEPARTMENT OF PROSTHODONTICS,

BAPUJI DENTAL COLLEGE AND HOSPITAL,

DAVANGERE-577 004.











    1. SIGNATURE












    1. CO-GUIDE (IF ANY)












    1. SIGNATURE












    1. HEAD OF THE DEPARTMENT




DR. NANDEESHWAR.D.B M.D.S.

PROFESSOR AND HEAD,

DEPARTMENT OF PROSTHODONTICS,

BAPUJI DENTAL COLLEGE AND HOSPITAL,



DAVANGERE-577 004.







    1. SIGNATURE









12.
12.1 REMARKS OF THE CHAIRMAN & THE PRINCIPAL












12. 2 SIGNATURE









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