Messing with Mixtures Station Labs



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Messing with Mixtures Station Labs

Follow all instructions carefully as you perform each station lab. Read all instructions.



Station 1: Hit the Trail!

  1. Have one person from your group obtain the following supplies from the front table.

  • One lunch bag full of…

  1. One scoop of Cheerios

  2. One scoop of M&M’s

  3. One scoop of Candy corn

  4. One scoop of Raisins

  5. One scoop of Cinnamon Toast Crunch



  1. Examine the bag of goodies. Would this mixture be classified as a heterogeneous or homogeneous mixture? __________________________ WHY?



  1. What is the total mass of your mixture? Don’t forget to subtract the mass of the bag.


Mass of the BAG + MIXTURE ________________


--- Mass of the BAG ________________


TOTAL MASS of the MIXTURE ________________





  1. Separate the parts of the mixture and find the mass of each group. Use the formula provided to calculate the percentage for each part of the mixture. Record your data in the chart.



Name

Mass (g.)

Mass of the Mixture

% of Mixture
























































Formula Mass of the substance (g) ÷ Mass of the mixture (g) x 100

Round the final percentage to the nearest hundredth! TOTAL = _100%_



Station 2: Tasty Solutions

  1. Read the steps below, THEN obtain 3 pieces of M&M’s from your teacher. You will need three for each group member.

Step 1: Place one piece of candy in your mouth and allow it to dissolve without using your tongue or teeth to help! Record the time (in seconds) it takes for the candy shell to dissolve. If the candy shell doesn’t dissolve in 5 minutes, STOP and record 5 minutes on your chart.

Step 2: Place another piece of candy in your mouth and allow it to dissolve using only your tongue to move it around. Record the time (in seconds) it takes for the candy shell to dissolve. If the candy shell doesn’t dissolve in 5 minutes, STOP and record 5 minutes on your chart.

Step 3: Place another piece of candy in your mouth and allow it to dissolve using your tongue and teeth. Record the time (in seconds) it takes for the candy shell to dissolve.

Piece of candy

Dissolving Time (S)

1




2




3




Solution (a homogeneous mixture) = Solute + Solvent

        • Solute: “stuff” being dissolved

        • Solvent: “stuff” doing the dissolving

    • The solute is present in the lesser quantity

  • The solvent is present in greater quantity



  1. In your solution, what was the solute and the solvent?

Solute = ____________________ Solvent = _______________________

  1. Explain the results of your experiment in terms of dissolving rate (time it takes for a substance to dissolve).

The dissolving rate (circle one) increases / decreases when ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

  1. Identify the solute(s) and solvent in each solution. UNDERLINE the solute and CIRCLE the solvents. .



Ocean water – salt and water

Antifreeze – Water and ethylene glycol

Soda pop – Syrup, water, and CO2 gas

Gold jewelry – Gold and copper

Kool-Aid – Powder, sugar, water

Lemonade – Water, lemon juice, and sugar

Air – Nitrogen, oxygen, and other gasses

Sterling silver – Silver and copper



  1. Which liquid is called the “universal solvent?” __________________________



  1. Which would have the most SOLUTE: A glass of very sweet Kool-Aid or a glass of barely sweet Kool-Aid? _____________________________________

WHY? ____________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________



Station 3: Mystery Colors

Chromatography is a range of physical methods use to separate and analyze complex mixtures. Today, you will use one method of chromatography to separate the ink pigments in black ink markers. You will then use this information to match the correct ink pigment colors to the correct brand of marker I used to write you my note. Similar methods are used in crime scene investigations.

First READ the instructions then get started.

Step 1: Obtain three strips of filter paper.

Step 2: Measure one inch from the bottom of the filter paper and draw a straight horizontal line across each piece of filter papers.


  • Make sure you use a different pen for each piece of filter paper and that you don’t mix them up!


Step 3: Fill the beaker to the 50 mL line.
Step 4: Lower the filter paper into the beaker so that only the TIP of the filter paper touches the surface of the water. Clip in the filter paper to the rim of the beaker being careful not to mix them up.

Step 5: Once the water has run up the entire strip of the paper, carefully unclip the filter paper and lay the strips on a paper towel.

Step 6: Record the ink pigments in the chart below.

Pen

Colors of ink pigments

A. Visa-A-Vis




B. Sharpie




C. Crayola






  1. Which marker did I use to write my note? _______________________________



  1. Identify the solute and the solvent for this experiment.

Solute = ____________________ Solvent = _______________________

3. Why didn’t the colors separate in the sharpie?



Station 4: See the Light

1. Observe the four bags at this station, being careful not to pop them. Record what you notice about the particle size of the substances in the mixture in the chart below.



Bag

Observations of particle size

1. Salt and water




2. Flour and water




3. Kool-aid powder and water




4. Dirt and water




5. Sand and water




2. Shine a flashlight through each bag. What do you observe about each mixture?

Bag

Observations of light passing through

1. Salt and water




2. Flour and water




3. Kool-aid powder and water




4. Dirt and water




5. Sand and water




3. Read the following information from the Columbia Encyclopedia, and then answer the questions.

One property of a colloid that distinguishes it from a true solution is that the particles in a colloid scatter light. If a beam of light passes through a colloid, the light is reflected or scattered by particles in the colloid and the path of the light can be observed. When a beam of light passes through a true solution there is so little scattering of the light that the path of the light cannot be seen and the small amount of scattered light cannot be detected except by very sensitive instruments. The scattering of light by colloids, known as the Tyndall effect, was first explained by the British physicist John Tyndall.

a. Which mixtures would be classified as colloids? _____________ & ______________

b. Which mixtures would be classified as a solution? ______________ & _______________

c. Name the solutes and solvents for the solutions.

Solute = ____________________ Solvent = _______________________

Solute = ____________________ Solvent = _______________________

A suspension is also a homogeneous mixture. In a suspension, particles are large enough so that not only does light scatter, but they also can settle to the bottom of the mixture. Suspensions can be separated by passing it through a filter.

Which bag was a suspension? ________________________________

Station 5: See the Separation!

Directions: using the laptops at station 4, log on and go to the following website:



http://www.harcourtschool.com/activity/mixture/mixture.html

Once at the website, follow the directions to complete the activity. The directions can be found in the box on the website. Record your information below.



Mixture

Separation Mechanism

Physical properties that allow separation



  1. Sand and iron fillings









  1. Salad









  1. Salt and water









  1. Muddy water









  1. Dust in air







Based on your findings answer the following questions by circling the correct word to complete the sentence.

  1. Mixtures can be separated by ( Physical / Chemical ) means. Therefore, Compounds can be separated by ( Physical / Chemical ) means.

Station 6: Vocabulary Victory!

Pick up a worksheet from station 5 and complete the worksheet by following the directions on the worksheet. The worksheet is front and back. You may complete this station at your desk, and you may use your notes, the textbook and each other to answer the questions. You may not use other groups. If this lab is not completed in class, you must finish it for homework.



Station 7: “Popping” with Properties

In this station you will be reviewing physical and chemical properties. Please be sure to read your directions first before completing the lab. You will need a pair of goggles for this station.



PART 1: Observation

  1. Obtain a piece of AlkaSeltzer and break it into 4 pieces. You only need 1/4th of the tablet.

  2. In the table below, record the physical and chemical properties of the alkaselzer tablet in the before column.

  3. Obtain 10 mL of Water. Record its physical and chemical properties in the before column.

PART 2: Experimentation

  1. Pour the 10 mL of water into the medicine bottle provided.

  2. Quickly drop the alkaseltzer piece into the bottle and place the cap on the bottle.

  3. Wait to see what happens! Record your findings below.



Physical Properties of the Reactants

(Before the experiment)



Physical Properties of the Products

(After the experiment)



AlkaSeltzer

Water

Combined










Chemical Properties of Reactants

(Before the experiment)



Chemical Properties of the Products

(After the experiment)



AlkaSeltzer

Water

Combined










In a chemical reaction we have indicators (things that tell us something is happening). In the space provided list all the things that tell you a chemical reaction took place in this lab.

Station 8: Mystery Elements

This station may be completed at your desks. Log onto the laptops using the following website:



http://www.columbia.k12.mo.us/ojhs/Newton/recipiesformatter/theperiodictable/phy03_int_ptable/phy03_int_ptable.swf

Once there, click on the tab that says “Mystery Elements”. This is the game you are going to play. Read the directions on the website and record your findings in the table below. Reset the game once you are done.



Hint: Electron configuration is the number of electrons in each shell of the Bohr’s diagram. Therefore, if you see a series of numbers like this 2,8,3; the 2 represents the number of electrons in the first shell, the 8 represents the number of electrons in the second shell, and the 3 represents the number of electrons in the 3rd shell, or the valence shell. Therefore this element would have 3 valence electrons.

Property used to classify

Element Name and Family Name

Metal, Nonmetal or Metalloid

1.







2.







3.







4.







5.







6.







7.







8.







9.







10.







11.







12.











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