Centre of social medicine and community health school of social sciences



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CENTRE OF SOCIAL MEDICINE AND COMMUNITY HEALTH

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES
Monsoon Semester 2014
Course No. : SM 611

Course Title : Population Problem and the Family Planning


Programme in India

Credits : 3

Instruction Methods : Lectures, group discussions and tutorials

Method of Evaluation : Written assignments with viva-voce,


presentation of term papers.
Course Teacher : Prof. Mohan Rao
Course Outline

  1. Approaches to the population question: classical approaches of Malthus and Marx, neo-Malthusian and dialectical approaches.

  2. Population in India: social, political and economic problems and their demographic and health dimensions.

  3. Studies on family planning, the socio-economic and cultural determinants of family size and population dynamics.

  4. Population Policy in India: evolution, growth and implications.

  5. Current strategies towards population planning: primary health care approach, child survival strategies, reproductive health care, state population policies, sex ratios, role of PRIs etc; other current concerns involving population issues.


Reading List


  1. Approaches to the Population Question




  1. Essential

  1. Malthus, T. (1970), An Essay on the Principle of Population, Penguin Books, London.

  2. Omran, Abdel (1971), The Epidemiological Transition: Theory of Epidemiology of Population Change, Milbank Memorial Fund Quarterly, Vol. XLIX, No.4, NY, 1971, pp. 509-538.

  3. McKeown, T. (1972), “An Interpretation of the Modern Rise of Population”, Population Studies, Vol. 26 No.3, pp.345-382.

  4. Rao, Mohan (1994), “An Imagined Reality: Malthusianism, Neo-Malthusianism and Population Myth”, Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. XXIX, No.5, pp.PE.40-51.

  5. Sen, Amartya, “ Population: Delusion and Reality”, http:/finance.saunder.ubc.ca/~bhatta/Articles By Amartya Sen on population.html

(New York Review of Books, 22nd September, 1994).

  1. Wuyts, Marc (1998), Malthus, Then and Now: The Novelty of Old Ideas on Population and Economy, Dies Natalis Lecture, Institute of Social Studies, The Hague, Netherland.

  2. Harvey, David (1974), “Ideology and Population Theory”, International Journal of Health Services, Vol. 4, No, 3, pp. 515-536.




  1. Suggested




  1. Hodgson, Dennis (1983), “Demography as Social Science and Policy Science”, Population and Development Review, Vol. 4, No.1, pp. 1-30.

  2. Boserup, Ester (1981), Population and Technological Change: A Study in Long Term Trends, University of Chicago Press, Chicago.

  3. Baird, Vanessa (2011): The No-Nonsense Guide to World Population, New Internationalist, U.K.


  1. Population in India


A. Essential


  1. Bose A et al (Eds.)(1974), Population in India’s Development:1947-2000, Vikas, New Delhi, 1974-Chapters by Mitra, Bardhan, Joshi and Desai, pp. 3-28, 65-100.

  2. Krishnaji, N. and James, K.S. (2005), “Religion and Fertility”, EPW, Vol.XL, No.5., pp. 455-58.

  3. Premi, M.K. (2001), The Missing Girl Child, EPW, Vol.XXXVI , No. 21, pp 1875-1880.


B. Suggested


  1. Srinivasan K. (1995), Regulating Reproduction in India’s Population: Efforts, Results and Recommendations, Sage, New Delhi.

  2. Vlassoff, Carol (1996): “Against the Odds: The Changing Impact of Schooling on Female Autonomy and Fertility in an Indian Village” in R. Jeffery and Alka M.Basu (Eds.), Girls’ Schooling Women’s Autonomy and Fertility Change in South Asia, Sage, New Delhi.




  1. Studies in Family Planning




  1. Essential




  1. Wyon, J.B. and Gordon, E. (1971), The Khanna Study: Population Problems in the Rural Punjab, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

  2. Mamdani, M. (1972), Myth of Population Control: Family, Caste and Class in an Indian Village, Monthly Review Press, New York.

  3. Mishra, B.D. et al (1982), Organization for Change: Systems Analysis of Family Planning in Rural India, Radiant Publishers, New Delhi.

  4. United Nations and Govt. of India (1961), The Mysore Population Study, New York.

  5. Bang, R. and Bang, A. et al (1989), “High Prevalence of Gynaecological Diseases in Rural Indian Women”, Lancet 8629, pp.85-88.




  1. Suggested




  1. Mamdani, Masuma (1999), “Adolescent Reproductive Health: Experience of Community-Based Programmes”, in Pachauri, S. (Ed.), Implementing a Reproductive Health Agenda in India, Population Council, New Delhi.




  1. Population Policy




  1. Essential




  1. Government of India, Planning Commission (1961), Third Five Year Plan, New Delhi.

  2. Government of India: Ministry of Health and Family Planning (1976), National Population Policy, New Delhi.

  3. Government of India, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (1980), National Population Policy, New Delhi.

  4. Government of India, Planning Commission (1980), Report of the Working Group on Population Policy: New Delhi.

  5. Population Crisis Committee (1985), “Population Growth and Economic Development”, Population, Feb., No.14, pp. 1-8.

  6. Government of India: Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (1993), Draft National Population Policy ( Chairman Dr M.S. Swaminathan), New Delhi.

  7. Geeta, V. and Swaminathan, P. (1994), “Politics of Population and Development”, EPW, Vol.XXIV, No.38, Sept. 17, pp.2470-72.

  8. Government of India, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (2000), National Population Policy 2000, New Delhi.

  9. Government of Andhra Pradesh (1997), Department if Medical, Health and Family Welfare, Andhra Pradesh State Population Policy: A Statement and a Strategy, Hyderabad.

  10. Government of Uttar Pradesh, Department of Health and Family Welfare (2000), Population Policy of Uttar Pradesh, Lucknow.

  11. Rao, Mohan and Jain, Devaki (2001), National Population Policy 2000: Re-examining Critical Issues”, EPW, Vol. XXXVI, No. 16, April 21st.




  1. Suggested




  1. Sen, Amartya (1995), ‘Authoritarianism vs Cooperation: Perspectives on Population Policy’, Frontline October 6, October 20, November 3, pp. 101-104.

  2. Rao, Mohan, (2002), “Injectibles, Incentives and Disincentives: Short-Sighted Population Policies”, The National Medical Journal of India ,15,(3), pp.123-127.

  3. Sen, Gita and Aditi Iyer (2002), “Incentives and Disincentives: Necessary, Effective, Just?” Seminar ,511 March, pp.44-48.




  1. Current Strategies Towards Population Planning




  1. Essential




  1. Government of India, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (1980), Report of the Working Group on Health for All By 2000, New Delhi.

  2. Government of India, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (1990), Towards Universal Immunization, New Delhi.

  3. Hodgson, D., and Watkins, Susan Cotts (1997), “Feminists and Neo-Malthusians: Past and Present Alliances, Population and Development Review, 23,(3), pp.469-523.

  4. The World Bank (1993), World Development Report 1993: Investing in Health, OUP, New York.

  5. The World Bank (1995), India’s Family Welfare Programme Towards a Reproductive and Child Health Approach, New Delhi.

  6. Qadeer, I., (1994), “The World Development Report 1993: The Brave New World of Primary Health Care”, Social Scientist, Vol. 22., Nos. 9-12, pp.27-39.

  7. Qadeer, I. (1998): “Reproductive Health: A Public Health Perspective”, EPW, Vol. XXX, No.41., pp.2765-2684.

  8. Government of India, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (2001), National Health Policy 2001, New Delhi.

  9. Government of India, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (2005), National Rural Health Mission, New Delhi.

  10. International Institute for Population Sciences (2000), National Family Health Survey, India, 1998-99, Bombay.

  11. Sen, Gita et al (2002) “Structural Reforms and Health Equity: A Comparison of NSS Surveys 1986-87 and 1995-96”, EPW, Vol. XXXVII, No.14, April 6th, pp. 1342-1352.

  12. Mohan Rao and Sarah Sexton (2010), “Rereading Cairo: Population, Health and Gender in Neo-Liberal Times” in Mohan Rao and Sarah Sexton (Eds), Markets and Malthus: Population, Gender and Health in Neo-Liberal Times, Sage, New Delhi.

  13. Hartmann, Betsy (2006), “Liberal Ends, Illiberal Means: National Security, “Environmental Conflict” and the Making of the Cairo Consensus”, in Mohan Rao and Sarah Sexton (Eds), Markets and Malthus: Population, Gender and Health in Neo-Liberal Times, Sage, New Delhi.

  14. Turshen, Meredeth (2010), “What has happened in Africa since Cairo?” in Mohan Rao and Sarah Sexton (Eds), Markets and Malthus: Population, Gender and Health in Neo-Liberal Times, Sage, New Delhi.

  15. Website of the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare for policy documents. (www.mohfw.nic.in)



  1. Suggested




  1. United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs, Population Division, World Population Aging: 1950-2050, New York.

  2. UN Conference on Sustainable Development, Rio + 20., www.nrdc.org.

  3. Desai, Sonalde (2010), “The Other Half of the Demographic Dividend”, EPW, Vol.XLV, No.4, 2nd October 2010, pp. 12-14.

Directory: SSS -> CSMCH
CSMCH -> Centre of Social Medicine and Community Health School of Social Sciences Monsoon Semester 2012
CSMCH -> Centre of social medicine and community health school of social sciences
SSS -> Saunders, sanders, sandars family and its blood connections
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SSS -> Including Canada, the continental United States, and the northern Mexican states of Baja California, Baja California Sur, Chihuahua, Coahuila de Zaragoza, Durango, Nuevo Leon, Sinaloa, Sonora, Tamaulipas, and Zacatecas
SSS -> Acquired immune deficiency syndrome or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome aids or Aids


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