Vocal Viewpoints Cheat Sheet pitch: “Pitch is the level of a sound in the scale, defined by its frequency. Pitch is where the sound lies within the possible range of the [voice]. A choice is made about where a note is placed in the vocal



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Vocal Viewpoints Cheat Sheet

PITCH: “Pitch is the level of a sound in the scale, defined by its frequency. Pitch is where the sound lies within the possible range of the [voice]. A choice is made about where a note is placed in the vocal range, from low to high or high to low” Partners should also respond or adjust to each other’s pitch.
DYNAMIC: “Dynamic is volume, or the loudness of a given sound. Dynamic is an expression of the degree of aggression or attack by the speaker. Notice how a simple change in Dynamic can radically change the meaning of a moment or interaction. Again, the choice of dynamic should emerge as a response to the dynamic offered by a scene partner.”
TEMPO: “Tempo is speed. Tempo is the speed with which the words or sounds are expressed. attention to tempo variation and responsiveness to a partner’s tempo are essential. One responds to the other’s tempo with a choice of tempo. Notice how Tempo can alter the meaning of the dialogue and the feel of the relationship expressed in speaking the dialogue.”
ACCELERATION/DECELERATION: “Ask partnerships to accelerate the speed of the dialogue together, starting slow and growing faster, maintaining and acceleration, never leveling out. Once this is possible, try the opposite direction--deceleration--by starting fast, and together collaborating on bringing the speed slower toward the end of the dialogue. How wide can the range of speed be? Notice again how Acceleration and Deceleration alter the meaning of dialogue as well as our perception of Relationship.”
REPETITION: “With an acute sensitivity to Repetition, participants should play with their partner’s pitch, dynamic or tempo through Repetition. Actors can use Repetition as one of the ways they communicate with one another.”
TIMBRE: “Actors should experiment with producing sound from various physical resonators, nasal, deep throated, belly, etc., depending on the character and the situation the character is facing.” It’s the particular type of sound your voice makes. Think about how different musical instruments have a different timbre.
SILENCE: “A sound is only as loud as the silence on either side of it. Silence offers an incredibly powerful tool for expression; we should acknowledge it, experiment with it and exploit it. Rather than a series of unconscious and random pauses, Silence gains meaning when it is intentional and aesthetically placed.” Find silences between sentences/words (and even in the middle of words) rather than between your partner’s lines. “Experiment with how Silence, when placed specifically and sparingly, can create or alter meaning.”


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