Thyroid Cartilage



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  • Thyroid Cartilage

  • Thyroid prominence is the Adam’s apple, at the base of notch.

  • Flares out to protect anterior and lateral larynx

  • The Thyroid Cartilage is the largest cartilage of the larynx.

  • It consists of two laminæ the anterior borders of which are fused with each other at an acute angle in the middle line of the neck, and form a subcutaneous projection named the laryngeal prominence ( Adams apple).

  • This prominence is larger in the males than in the females. Immediately above it the laminæ are separated by a V-shaped notch, the superior thyroid notch.

  • The posterior angles are prolonged into processes termed the superior and inferior cornua.

  • Superior cornu or horns--- point toward hyoid bone

  • Connected by lateral hyothyroid ligament

  • Inferior cornu--- rest on cricoid cartilage

  • C4-C6 vertebrae sit behind

Cricoid Cartilage



  • The Cricoid Cartilage is smaller, but thicker and stronger than the thyroid, and forms the lower and posterior parts of the wall of the larynx.

  • Shaped like a ring

  • Low, narrow in front (arch)

  • Wide and thick in back

  • Below attaches to trachea

  • Facets on posterior-lateral surface: receive inferior cornu of thyroid

  • Cricothyroid ligament seals space between thyroid and cricoid in front



Arytenoid Cartilages

  • The Arytenoid Cartilages are two in number, and situated at the upper border of the lamina of the cricoid cartilage, at the back of the larynx.

  • Each is pyramidal in form, and has three surfaces, a base, and an apex.

  • The apex of each cartilage is pointed, and surmounted by a small conical, cartilaginous nodule, the corniculate cartilage.







  • Vocal ligament attaches to vocal process & medial fibers of vocal muscles

  • Muscular process hold lateral portion of vocal folds and lateral and posterior cricoarytenoid muscles

  • Ventricular ligament: superior to vocal process

  • Attaches to inner surface of thyroid cartilages




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