Office Hours: Wed, 10am 1pm & 3-4pm; 225 Brighton Hall Phone



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Professor: Stephen E. Brock, Ph.D., NCSP

Office Hours: Wed, 10am - 1pm & 3-4pm ; 225 Brighton Hall

Phone: 916-278-5919

E-mail: brock@csus.edu


EDS 240; Fall, 2013

Course Title: Functional Assessment of Behavior

Day/Time: Wednesdays, 12:00 to 2:50pm

Room: 223 Eureka Hall (tent)






Functional Assessment of Behavior

Course Syllabus



Course Description:

Assessment of behavior using the techniques of applied behavior analysis. Students will learn how to conduct functional assessments of behavior and how to write behavior intervention plans. Methods appropriate for assessment of children in the school setting will be emphasized.


Prerequisite:

Approval as a candidate in the School Psychology program or instructor permission.


Course Objectives:

  1. Students will learn how to conduct, and will complete, a satisfactory functional assessment of behavior (FBA).

  2. Students will learn how to develop a satisfactory positive behavior intervention plan (BIP).

  3. Students will learn how to evaluate a positive behavior intervention plan (BIP).

  4. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the ethical and legal issues associated with functional assessment and behavior intervention.


Required Readings:

Brock, S. E., Grove, B., & Searls, M. (2010). ADHD: Classroom interventions. In A. S. Canter, L. Z. Paige, & S. Shaw (Eds.), Helping children at home and school III: Handouts for families and educators (pp. S8H5-1 – S8H5-5. Bethesda, MD: National Association of School Psychologists. (Available from http://www.nasponline.org/publications/booksproducts/hchs2.aspx for $75.00.)

Browning-Wright, D., & Cafferata, G. (2007). The BSP desk reference: A teacher and behavior support team’s guide to developing and evaluating behavior support plans for behaviors that interfere with the learning of students and/or peers. Los Angeles, CA: Positive Environments, Network of Trainers. Retrieved August 8, 2013, from http://www.pent.ca.gov/dsk/bspmanual.html

California Education Code (Selected sections to be specified by the instructor). Available from http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/.html/edc_table_of_contents.html

California Code of Regulations, Title 5. (Selected sections to be specified by the instructor). Available from http://www.calregs.com/linkedslice/default.asp?SP=CCR-1000&Action=Welcome

Chandler, L. K., & Dahlquist, C. M. (2010). Functional assessment: Strategies to prevent and remediate challenging behaviors in school settings (3rd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill/Pearson. [Available at www.amazon.com from $44.97 new, and $40.960 used.]

Cummings, C., Brock, S. E., & Puopolo, M. (2003, March). Assessment of establishing operations. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the California Association of School Psychologists, Los Angeles, CA. Retrieved August 8, 2013, from http://www.csus.edu/indiv/b/brocks/Courses/EDS%20240/student_materials.htm

The Center for Effective Collaboration and Practice (CECP). (1998, 2000). Functional behavior assessment (Parts I, II, & III). Retrieved August 8, 2013, http://cecp.air.org/fba/default.asp

U.S. Department of Education. (2006, August 14). 34 CFR Parts 300 and 301. Federal Register, 71(156), 46540-46845.
Recommended Reading:

Dixon, M. R., Jackson, J. W., Small, S. L., Horner-King, M. L., Lik, N. M. K., Garcia, Y., & Rosales, R.. (2009). Creating single-subject design graphs with Microsoft Excel 2007. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 42, 277-293. Retrieved August 8, 2013 from http://www.jeabjaba.org/jaba/articles/2009/jaba-42-02-0277.pdf



O’Neill, R., Horner, R., Albin, R., Storey, K., & Sprague, J. (1997). Functional assessment and program development for problem behavior: A practical handbook. Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole. [Available at www.amazon.com from $85.00 new, and $50.00 used.]

Course Requirements/Grading (100 points maximum):
1. Attendance/Class participation. Attendance and participation in class discussions and activities will be worth 20 points. Class attendance will be monitored. Students missing more than 2 classes cannot receive an “A” grade. Students missing more than 3 classes cannot receive a “B” grade.

  1. Quizzes. Performance on four separate quizzes (each worth 6.25 points) will be used to assess student knowledge of important concepts (i.e., key terms and definitions, functional assessment strategies, behavior intervention principles, legal issues). Performance on these quizzes will be worth a total of 25 points.

4. Functional Behavioral Assessment (FBA). Working within their fieldwork settings students will be required to conduct a FBA. The first draft of the written report summarizing the FBA will be graded and used to document understanding of concepts being taught. Evaluation of this report will be worth 25 points. (Note: If you do not have or are unable to conduct a FBA within a fieldwork setting see the instructor ASAP).

  1. Behavior Intervention Plan (BIP). Students will be required to develop a BIP. The first draft of the written BIP will be graded and used to document understanding of concepts being taught. Evaluation of this plan will be worth 25 points.

  2. Behavior Intervention Plan (BIP) Evaluation. Students will be required to evaluate the effectiveness of their BIP. Documentation of this data will be worth 5 points.


Letter grades will be based upon the following point totals


A =

95 points and above

A- =


94 to 90 points

B+ =

89 to 88 points

B =

87 to 85 points

B- =

84 to 80 points

C =

79 to 70 points

D =

69 to 50 points

F =

below 50 points


Special Notes:

  1. This course addresses elements of the following NASP domains of school psychology training and practice:


2.1, Data-Based Decision-Making and Accountability

2.2, Consultation and Collaboration

2.3, Effective Instruction and Development of Cognitive/Academic Skills

2.4, Socialization and Development of Life Skills



  1. Specific student outcomes achieved during this course that are consistent with CSUS School Psychology Program Objectives includes the development of a specific skill set designed to assess client student needs, develop appropriate behavioral interventions, and use data to make decisions regarding the effectiveness of those interventions.

  2. Please turn off all cell phones or, if you need to be available for any emergency phone calls, put it on silent mode.

  3. Computer use is not allowed (emailing, web surfing) unless it is a directed part of a classroom activity. If you need to use your computer for note taking during class please check with the instructor prior to doing so for this class.

  4. Assigned grades will be consistent with CSUS grading policy as described in the CSUS course catalog.

  5. If you have a disability and require accommodations, you need to provide disability documentations to SSWD, Lassen Hall 1008, (916) 278-6955. Please discuss your accommodation needs with the instructor after class or during office hours early in the semester.

  6. Academic Honesty Policy: Go to http://www.csus.edu/admbus/umanual/UMA00150.htm for the CSUS Academic Honesty Policy and Procedures. Per University Policy all students are responsible for:

  1. Understanding the rules that preserve academic honesty and abiding by them at all times. This includes learning and following the particular rules associated with specific classes, exams, and course assignments. Ignorance of these rules is not a defense to a charge of academic dishonesty.

  2. Understanding what cheating and plagiarism are and taking steps to avoid them. Students are expected to do this whether working individually or as part of a group.

  3. Not taking credit for academic work that is not their own.

  4. Not knowingly encouraging or making possible cheating or plagiarism by others.

Please refer to http://library.csus.edu/content2.asp?pageID=353 for a student tutorial on how to avoid plagiarism.

Course Outline





Date

Topic/Activity


Assignments

(To be competed by class date)



September

4


  • Course overview and expectations.

  • Introduction to behavioral psychology

  • Obtain required readings.




September

11


  • Key Terms and Definitions.

  • Quiz

  • CECP, Part I.

  • Browning-Wright & Cafferata, Section 1.

  • Chandler & Dahlquist, Chapters 1 & 2.

September

18


  • Functional Assessment:

  • Overview

  • Target Selection

  • Record Review

  • Quiz

  • Fieldwork: Find someone to supervise your FBA/BIP

  • Browning-Wright & Cafferata, Section 4.

  • CECP, Part II.

  • Chandler & Dahlquist, Chapter 3.

Recommended Reading

  • O’Neill et al., Chapter 1.

September

25


  • Functional Assessment:

  • Behavior Rating Scales

  • Interviews

  • Browning-Wright & Cafferata, Sections 5 & 6.

  • Chandler & Dahlquist, Chapters 4 & 5.

  • Cummings, Brock, & Puopolo.

Recommended Reading

  • O’Neill et al., pp 9-34.

October

2


  • No Class (ISPA)




October

9


  • Functional Assessment:

  • Observation techniques

  • Establishing a baseline

  • Hypothesis Testing

  • Fieldwork: Identify FBA/BIP case study.

  • Browning-Wright & Cafferata, Section 3.

Recommended Reading

  • O’Neill et al., pp 35-61.

October

16


  • Writing the FBA.

  • Case Conferences

  • Fieldwork: Conduct teacher (and optional parent) interview(s).

October

23


  • Case Conferences

  • Fieldwork: Behavioral observations (establish a baseline).

October

30


  • Behavioral Intervention:

  • Overview

  • Quiz

  • Browning-Wright & Cafferata, Section 7, 8, & 9.

  • CECP, Part III.

Recommended Reading

  • O’Neill et al., Chapter 3.

November

6


  • Shortened Class (Ends at 1:30pm, CASP)

  • Behavioral Intervention:

  • Classroom Accommodations for ADHD

  • Increasing On-task Behavior

  • First draft of FBA due.

  • Brock, Grove, & Searls.

  • Chandler & Dahlquist, Chapters 6, 7, & 8,

November

13


  • Writing the BIP

  • Case Conferences

  • Browning-Wright & Cafferata, Section 11.

Recommended Reading

  • O’Neill et al., Chapter 4.

  • Dixon et al.

November

20


  • Behavioral Intervention:

  • Emergency Interventions

  • Browning-Wright & Cafferata, Sections 12, 13, & 14.

November

27


  • Individual Case Conferences

  • First Draft of BIP due to brock@csus.edu

  • Identify specific course related content that you have had a difficult time understanding

December

4


  • Manifestation Determinations




December

11


  • Legal and Ethical Issues.

  • Quiz

  • U.S. Dept. of Ed. §300.24, §300.170, §300.226, §300.304, §300.310-311, §300.324, §300.530, §300.534-536.

  • CA Education Code, §56520-56525.

  • CA Code of Regulations, §3065(d)(e).

  • Semester 3 Portfolios Due

December

18


  • Finals Week

  • No Class Meeting

  • Final Drafts of FBA and BIP due

  • BIP evaluation data due

Behavior Consultation Fieldwork Timeline

1. Working with your school psychology fieldwork supervisor identify a student with a mild to moderate behavior problem.

NOTES:


  1. Typically this will not be a student who has a serious behavior problem of the type that would require a Hughes Bill Functional Analysis Assessment (FAA).

  2. A fieldwork supervisor who can supervise your Functional Behavioral Assessment (FBA)/Behavior Intervention plan (BIP) should be identified by September 18th

  3. See the instructor ASAP if you have difficulty obtaining a fieldwork setting within which to conduct an FBA.

2. Working with your school psychology fieldwork supervisor, identify a student appropriate for an FBA/BIP case study. Determine if the identified student’s teacher is willing to spend at least one hour talking with you about the student’s behavior and is willing to have you spend at least 5 hours observing the student in his or her classroom. Obtain parental consent to conduct the FBA and develop the BIP.

NOTE:


  1. Teacher/student should be identified by October 9th.

3. Interview the teacher to first identify and operationalize a problem behavior. Then interview the teacher to gain additional information regarding the antecedents and consequents of the problem behavior.

NOTES:


  1. This should take at least 60-minutes and should be completed by October 16th.

  2. When possible a parent interview should also be conducted and completed by October 16th

4. Making use of appropriate observational techniques determine the frequency, duration, and/or intensity of the problem behavior; and establish a baseline that can be used to assess intervention effectiveness.

NOTE:


  1. Five (5) 60-minute observations is the minimum and should be completed by October 23rd.

5. From the interview and observation data write a FBA report.

NOTE:


  1. The first draft of the FBA must be completed and turned in by November 6th. While this draft is the one that is graded, it is likely that revision, based on instructor feedback, will be required before a final draft is completed.

6. From the FBA report develop a proposed BIP.

NOTE:


  1. The first draft of the BIP must be completed and turned in on November 27th. While this draft is the one that is graded, it is likely that revision, based on instructor feedback, will be required before a final draft is completed.

7. Share the final drafts of the FBA and proposed BIP, first with your school psychology field supervisor, and then with the teacher of the student with the challenging behavior. Then facilitate implementation of the BIP and by December 18th obtain and turn in follow-up data. When compared with baseline data, follow-up data should be used to determine the effectiveness of the BIP.




If you or your school psychology fieldwork supervisor has any questions feel free to contact me via e-mail (brock@csus.edu) or phone (916-278-5919).

September 1, 2013


Dear Fieldwork Supervisor;
Thank you for agreeing to participate in the supervision of CSUS school psychology fieldworkers. As you know, this practical experience is a critical part of our students’ training. One of the fieldwork requirements for the fall 2011 semester is to practice conducting a functional behavioral assessment (FBA) and developing a behavior intervention plan (BIP). These practical experiences parallel a course I teach, and within which school psychology fieldworkers are enrolled (EDS 240: Functional Assessment of Behavior). In this letter I will provide you with expectations, which when met, allow your fieldworker to meet these specific fieldwork/course requirements. Please do not hesitate to contact me if you have any questions at 916-278-5919 or at brock@csus.edu.
First, it is important to keep in mind that this is the first FBA most fieldworkers will conduct. Thus, it is recommended that the child identified for this practical activity have only mild to moderate behavior problems. While working with children with more severe behavior challenges is not ruled out, typically it is best if the child not have the type of serious behavior problems that would require a Hughes Bill Functional Analysis Assessment.
It is anticipated that by September 18, 2013, fieldworkers will have identified the school, and that by October 9, 2013, they will have identified the specific classroom and student within which they will conduct the FBA and develop the BIP. In making this selection it is important to ensure that the teacher of the targeted child is willing to spend at least one-hour talking to the fieldworker about the child’s behavior, and is comfortable with the fieldworker spending at least five-hours observing the child in his or her classroom. It would also be helpful if the teaching staff was willing to collect behavioral data. To facilitate teacher understanding of this activity attached find another letter that explains this fieldwork/course requirement. If you think it would be helpful feel free to make use of this letter. In addition, in making this selection it is important to obtain parental consent for a child’s participation in this activity and it is ideal if the fieldworker is given the chance to conduct a parent interview.
It is important for you, and the teacher of the targeted child, to understand that in most cases fieldworkers are learning specific aspects of functional assessment at specific points during the fall semester. Thus, this first functional assessment may take them longer than might typically be the case. Specifically, fieldworkers will have had instruction on identifying and operationalizing problem behaviors, and conducting the teacher interview by September 25, 2013. They will have had instruction on conducting behavioral observations and establishing a baseline by October 9, 2013, and the first draft of the FBA report is not due until October 26, 2013. Furthermore, the first draft of the BIP is not due until November 6, 2013. This relatively long timeline emphasizes the importance of the targeted child not being one in urgent need of behavioral intervention. Data evaluating the effectiveness of the BIP is not due until December 18, 2013.
Thank you for agreeing to supervise a CSUS school psychology fieldworker and providing this essential learning experience. Again feel free to contact me if you have any questions.
Sincerely;

Stephen E. Brock, Ph.D., NCSP, LEP

Professor and Program Coordinator

916-278-5919 / brock@csus.edu



September 1, 2011
Dear Teacher;
Thank you for agreeing to participate in the professional development of CSUS school psychology fieldworkers. Your efforts are very much appreciated by the CSUS school psychology faculty. The specific training experience you are a part of is designed to train the fieldworker to conduct functional behavioral assessments (FBA) and to write behavior intervention plans (BIP). This practical experience will parallel a course I teach and within which school psychology fieldworkers are enrolled (EDS 240: Functional Assessment of Behavior). In this letter I will provide you with my expectations for this training activity. Please do not hesitate to contact me if you have any questions at 916-278-5919 or at brock@csus.edu.
First, it is important to keep in mind that this is the first functional assessment most fieldworkers will conduct. Thus, I recommend that the child identified for this practical activity have only mild to moderate behavior problems. While working with children with more severe behavior problems is not ruled out, typically it is best if the child not have a serious behavior problem that is in urgent need of behavioral intervention.
Second, it is also important to acknowledge that in completing this activity the fieldworker will need to spend at least one-hour talking to you about the child’s behavior challenges, and will need to spend at least five-hours observing the child in your classroom. If this is not possible, please let the fieldworker know this as soon as possible, so that another training experience can be found. It will also be extremely helpful if you and/or a teaching assistant are willing to collect data on the student’s challenging behavior (e.g., count the number of times it occurs within a specific time frame). This data collection will take place both before and after a behavior intervention plan is implemented. As appropriate and possible, it may also be helpful if parent interview data is obtained.
Finally, it is important for you to understand that in most cases fieldworkers are learning specific aspects of behavior assessment and intervention at specific points during the fall semester. Thus, this first assessment/intervention plan will take them longer than is typically the case. Specifically, fieldworkers will have had the instruction they need to conduct the behavioral assessment by October 9, 2013, with the first draft of the functional behavioral assessment report not being due until November 6, 2013. Furthermore, the first draft of the behavior intervention plan is not due until November 27, 2013. This relatively long timeline emphasizes the importance of the targeted child not being one in urgent need of behavioral intervention. Data evaluating the effectiveness of the behavior plan developed (in consultation with you, the fieldworker, and the fieldworker’s supervisor) is not due until December 18, 2013.
Thank you for agreeing to provide this essential school psychology learning experience. Again feel free to contact me if you have any questions.

Sincerely;



Stephen E. Brock, Ph.D., NCSP

Professor and School Psychology Program Coordinator

916-278-5919



brock@csus.edu

Portfolio
The School Psychology Portfolio is used as a formative evaluation tool throughout the candidate’s enrollment in the CSUS school psychology training program. At the conclusion of the internship it is used as a summative evaluation.
Alignment with NASP Standards: The Portfolio is aligned with 7 the 11 NASP domains approximately as follows:


NASP STANDARD

Applicable Items from Portfolio

2.1 Data-Based Decision-Making and Accountability

  1. Developmental and Health History Questionnaire

  2. GATE Evaluation

  3. Psychoeducational Evaluation

  4. FAA and BIP

  5. Academic Intervention Case Study

  6. Assessment Resources Notebook

  7. Early Fieldwork Evaluation

  8. Intern Evaluation

2.2 Consultation and Collaboration:

  1. FAA and BIP

  2. Academic Intervention Case Study

  3. Early Fieldwork Evaluation

  4. Intern Evaluation

2.3 Effective Instruction and Development of Cognitive/Academic Skills

  1. Developmental and Health History Questionnaire

  2. Psychoeducational Evaluation

  3. Academic Intervention Case Study

  4. Early Fieldwork Evaluation

  5. Intern Evaluation

2.4 Socialization and Development of Life Skills:

  1. Early Fieldwork Evaluation

  2. Intern Evaluation

2.5 Student Diversity in Development and Learning:

  1. Disability Information pamphlet

  2. Early Fieldwork Evaluation

  3. Intern Evaluation

2.6 School and Systems Organization, Policy Development, and Climate

  1. Early Fieldwork Evaluation

  2. Intern Evaluation

2.7 Prevention, Crisis Intervention, and Mental Health

  1. Crisis Intervention Script

  2. Suicide Intervention Script

  3. Early Fieldwork Evaluation

  4. Intern Evaluation

2.8 Home/School Community Collaboration

  1. Early Fieldwork Evaluation

  2. Intern Evaluation

2.9 Research and Program Evaluation:

  1. Early Fieldwork Evaluation

  2. Intern Evaluation

2.10 School Psychology Practice and Development

  1. Resume

  2. Hotsheet

  3. Early Fieldwork Evaluation

  4. Intern Evaluation

2.11 Information Technology:

  1. Early Fieldwork Evaluation

  2. Intern Evaluation

PORTFOLIO OUTLINE
The portfolio serves several purposes:

  • First, it will provide documentation of the competencies that you have developed while in the CSUS school psychology program.

  • Second, it will allow you and the faculty to note any omissions in instruction, program, or competencies.

  • Third, it will help you to better understand the knowledge base and skills pertinent to your practice as a school psychologist.

  • Fourth, it will be a valuable document for presenting to prospective employers your competencies and experiences.

  • Fifth, it will be a useful tool as you begin your school psychology practice.

Each semester you will be expected to add to your portfolio and have it reviewed by a faculty member. At the conclusion of your course work, during the internship year, your faculty advisor and/or Internship supervisors, will need to verify that the portfolio has been completed.


There are several approaches to constructing your portfolio and each person has his or her own approach. Because your portfolio is both a personal and public document it is important that it reflect your individuality as well as meet certain standards as to content. Here are some suggestions that we have for how you might organize your portfolio.


  1. Resume




  1. The following sections in which you would include examples of your work that are listed on the following page. You also might include in each section a list of relevant coursework completed:

  1. Consultation

  2. Intervention

  3. Assessment

  4. Counseling

  5. Resources

  6. Research

  7. Law and Ethics




  1. A list of your course work and/or a copy of your transcripts




  1. Certificates/credentials/honors




  1. Other items that reflect what you consider your strengths. This is a document to be proud of, so enjoy showing off your skills! For example, CASP or NASP presentations.

PORTFOLIO EVALUATION


The Portfolio must include, but shall not be limited to, the following documents

Keep this sheet in the front of your binder so that faculty can review and check off that the required documents are present.




Name: Advisor:

Items initialed by instructor have been adequately met and are included in the portfolio.


Semester One: Fall semester, first year evaluation (EDS 245 instructor)

_____ Resume (which will be updated each semester)

_____ History Questionnaire (from EDS 248)

_____ Hotsheet (from EDS 245)

_____ Abstract of group curriculum (from EDS 231)

_____


Semester Two: Spring semester, first year (EDS 242 instructor)

_____ Updated Resume

_____ GATE evaluation (from EDS 242)

_____ (from EDS 242)

_____
Semester Three: Fall semester, second year (EDS 240 instructor)

_____ Updated Resume

_____ Psychoeducational evaluation (from EDS 243 first semester)

_____ Assessment Resources Notebook (from EDS 244)

_____ FAA and BIP (from EDS 240)

_____ Academic Intervention Case Study (from EDS 246A)

_____ Early Fieldwork in School Psychology Evaluation Form (from EDS 439)

_____

Semester Four: Spring semester, second year (EDS 247 instructor)

_____ Updated Resume

_____ Disability information pamphlet (from EDS 247)

_____ Psychoeducational evaluation (from EDS 243 second semester)

_____ Crisis Intervention and Suicide Intervention scripts (from EDS 246b)

_____ School Psychology Early Fieldwork Evaluation Form (from EDS 439)

_____
Semesters Five & Six: Internship, third year (EDS 441 instructor and or Program Coordinator)

_____ Updated Resume

_____ School Psychology Internship Evaluation Form

_____ Behavioral Intervention Case Study

_____ Academic Intervention Case Study

_____ Psychoeducational evaluation



_____ Selected materials (as determined by supervisor and intern)




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