Migrations Statistics Quarterly



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Thank you for your request, which we have answered as fully as we are able. In order to do so we have assumed that your reference to ‘Brexit’ means the EU referendum of 23 June 2016. The latest figures available for migration are contained in the latest Migrations Statistics Quarterly report (published 1 December 2016) and are for the year ending June 2016. We use the UN recommendation for defining a long-term international migrant (LTIM). That is, a migrant is someone who changes his or her country of usual residence for a period of at least a year, so that the country of destination effectively becomes the country of usual residence. This definition does not necessarily coincide with those used by other organisations.
The stock tables give the number of people living in the country whereas long term international migration figures are for the flow of people in and out of the country. Where you have asked for the number of people living in the UK we have provided what seems to be the most appropriate stock tables and where you have asked about people entering and leaving we have provided what seems to be the most appropriate flow tables. In some cases we have provided both to try to fully answer your question.
Please note that country of birth refers to the country that a person was born in and cannot change. Nationality refers to the nationality stated by the respondent when they are interviewed and can be subject to change.
1. How many immigrants currently live in the UK –
Latest figures for the UK of household population by country of birth can be found in the stock tables in this link. In 2015 (the latest year for which figures are available) 8,569,000 (+ or – 133,000) of the usually resident population of the UK was born abroad. This means that we expect the true figure to be between 8,436,000 and 8,702,000.

Latest figures for the UK of household population by nationality can be found in the stock tables in this link. In 2015 (the latest year for which figures are available) 5,567,000 (+ or – 107,000) of the usually resident population of the UK held non-British nationality. This means that we expect the true figure to be between 5,460,000 and 5,674,000.

Please refer to the Contents and Notes page and the Notes at the bottom of each table for assistance in using the tables.
2. How many immigrants work –
The tables in this link give the number of people in employment in the UK by county of birth and nationality. For Jul-Sep 2016 the number of non-UK born people in employment by country of birth was 5,552,000. For Jul-Sep 2016 the number of non-British people in employment by nationality was 3,490,000.
3. How many immigrants claim benefits –
The Department for Work and Pensions and Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs publish some data regarding non-UK/EU nationals claiming benefits. We would advise contacting them: DWP can be contacted at igs.foi@dwp.gsi.gov.uk or 0191 216 8596 and HMRC via HMRC FoI Act Team, Room 1C/23, 100 Parliament Street, London SW1A 2BQ.
4. How many immigrants have left the UK since Brexit –
Our latest published estimates refer to the year ending June 2016, so it is too early to say what effect, if any, the EU Referendum has had on long-term international migration. There does not, however, appear to have been any significant impact during the run up to the vote. Our next release on 23 February will include data for year ending September 2016 so will cover a longer period following the EU Referendum. Data covering a full year after the referendum (year ending June 2017) will be available in November 2017.
5. How many immigrants have moved to the UK since Brexit –
See the answer to question 4 above
6. Which countries immigrants who moved to the UK lived previously, and what % of them.
To try to ensure that we fully answer your question we have provided figures for the people who live in the UK (stock tables) and figures from the latest immigration tables (the flows in and out).

Stock table 1.3 in this link gives the numbers of people who live in the UK by country of birth outside the UK for the 60 countries with the highest numbers.

Stock table 2.3 in this link gives the numbers of people who live in the UK by nationality for the 60 countries with the highest numbers.

These tables, 3.20abc and 4.01 give numbers of long term migrants by citizenship and country of last (where they came from) and next (where they are going to) residence.

7. Which areas of the UK are high in immigration –
Migration inflows and outflows are given in this link for mid-year to mid-year from 2004. The tables also provide figures for non-UK born (country of birth) and non-British (nationality) people by local authority.

The stock (the people living in an area) table 1.1 in this link gives the numbers of people by country of birth. Table 2.4 of this link gives the numbers of people by nationality.


8. How many illegal immigrants live in the UK –
See section 3.8 of LTIM FAQ and Background Notes which explains the issues about providing an accurate figure for people who are in the country illegally.
9. Gender of immigrants and illegal immigrants –
This table provides data about long term international migrants by sex. Also see the link in the answer to question 8.

10. Age of immigrants and illegal immigrants –


This table provides data about long term international migrants by age. Also see the link in the answer to question 8.
11. Whether or not immigrants have children living in the UK –
We currently have no published data covering this subject so section 22 of the Freedom of Information Act allows us an exemption.
12. Whether or not immigrants have children living outside the UK –
We do not have any data about people living outside the UK so are unable to answer this question.

13. How many immigrants are homeless in the UK –


We do not collect data about homeless people so we are unable to provide any data about the number of immigrants who may be homeless.


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