Course 1: Food Production, Nutrition and Health Project: Food for Thought Essential Question



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Closing – 5 minutes

  • Students will turn in their Exit Slip for that day. They will respond to the following prompt:

“What does a mean score represent? Why do we use mean scores to summarize data?”


Day Fifteen
Key Question of the Day: How well did your food tracking system work?

Bell-Work (Each day the Bell-Work question should be prominently displayed and used to open the lesson)



  • Provide students with the weekly Bell-Work sheet – Appendix 1

“What are you expecting to see today for the results of the study?”

Learning Objectives:

As a result of this lesson, students will be able to:



  • Analyze the results of the food tracking system survey.

  • Describe the benefits and drawbacks of the food tracking system.

  • Develop a presentation for the class and nutrition expert that explains the system and how it was received by the participants.

Required Materials for Daily Lesson

Estimated Instructional Time: One 50-minute period

Opening – 5 minutes

  • Read the Bell-Work question and solicit responses from the students.

  • Have a brief discussion about the overall predictions students made about their results.

  • Explain that, “Today we are going to analyze the data on the surveys and integrate that information into your final presentations.”

Middle – 40 minutes

  • Each team must calculate the mean scores for each question on the survey and respond to the following questions:

    • Which items on your survey (about the food tracking system) had the highest mean responses?

    • Which items on your survey had the lowest mean responses?

  • Once the calculations are complete, each team should add their mean scores to their presentation. They must explain what the mean scores for each indicate about their food tracking system. For example, if the mean score for all items about ease of use was a 4 or higher, participants agreed or strongly agreed that the tracking system was easy to use.

  • Visit each team as they work to determine what their mean scores indicate about each item.

  • Post the following on the board as a guide:






Response

0-1.49

Strongly Disagree

1.5 – 2.49

Disagree

2.5-3.49

Neutral

3.5-4.49

Agree

4.5-5

Strongly Agree




  • Remind students that their presentation must include a discussion of these survey results. Each team must address which components of their tracking system work well and which need changes. They should draw conclusions and make recommendations about the changes they would make.

  • Any remaining time in the class period should be focused on teams finalizing their presentations.

Closing – 5 minutes

  • Students will turn in their Exit Slip for that day. They will respond to the following prompt:

“How do you feel about the results of your data? Do you agree or disagree with the findings of the study?”

  • Collect the Exit Slip for the day as students leave the classroom


Day Sixteen
Key Question of the Day: (Continuation of Day Fifteen) How well did your food tracking system work?

Bell-Work (Each day the Bell-Work question should be prominently displayed and used to open the lesson)



  • Provide students with the weekly Bell-Work sheet – Appendix 1

“What questions clarification do you need to finish up your presentations?”

Learning Objectives:

As a result of this lesson, students will be able to:



  • Analyze the results of their food tracking system survey.

  • Describe the benefits and drawbacks of the food tracking system.

  • Develop a presentation to the class and nutrition expert that explains the system and how it was received by the participants.

Required Materials for Daily Lesson

  • Computers

  • Internet

  • Project Rubric – Appendix 17 – One per team

  • Collaboration Rubric – Appendix 18 – One per team

Estimated Instructional Time: One 50-minute period

Opening – 5 minutes

  • Read the Bell-Work question and solicit responses from the students.

  • Answer any questions the students still have about their presentations.

  • Explain that, “This is the last day you will have in class to work on finishing up your presentations.”

Middle – 40 minutes

  • Have computers available for students to work on their presentations.

  • Teams should work to complete their presentations.

  • Remind them to review the project description and the presentation rubric to ensure that they are addressing the entire project.

  • If any teams finish early, ask to see their work to assess progress.

  • Then, as teams finish, ask them to complete the collaboration rubric (Appendix 18).

  • Each team should provide an electronic copy of the presentation to you before the end of the day.

    • Teacher TIP! Even if students are going to make changes for homework, they must give you what they have at the end of the class. This will eliminate issues at the start of the presentations if someone on a team is absent or can’t log into a computer. You’ll have a copy available to work from.

Closing – 5 minutes

  • Students will turn in their Exit Slip for that day. They will respond to the following prompt:

“What is your role in the team’s presentation? Are you ready for it?”

  • Collect the Exit Slip for the day as students leave the classroom

Day Seventeen
Key Question of the Day: Which components of each food tracking system worked well?

Bell-Work (Each day the Bell-Work question should be prominently displayed and used to open the lesson)



  • Provide students with the weekly Bell-Work sheet – Appendix 1

“List two questions you can ask each team about their food diary.”

Learning Objectives:

As a result of this lesson, students will:



  • Compare food tracking systems.

  • Demonstrate effective presentation skills.

Required Materials for Daily Lesson

  • Computers

  • Project Presentation Audience Feedback – Appendix 19

Estimated Instructional Time: One 50-minute period

Opening – 5 minutes

  • Read the Bell-Work question and but don’t solicit responses from the students. The questions should be saved for the presentations.

  • Review the qualities of a good audience before the presentations begin.

  • Introduce the nutrition expert guest and review presentation procedures (time limits if you’ve set them, who may ask questions, completion of peer reviews) before the first team presents. It is suggested to determine order of presentation by random draw.

Middle – 40 minutes

  • Each team presents.

  • As each team finishes their presentation, students in the audience should ask their questions.

  • After the question and answer session, the students in the audience should complete the presentation rubric (Appendix 19).

  • Students should also write, in their research journals, which components of the team’s tracking system they think worked well and should be considered for the final product.

  • If there is time at the end of the class, following the presentations, each team should meet for five minutes to compare individual notes about the other teams’ tracking systems. Each team should have a shared list in their research journals of the components they think worked well. They will refer to this information the next day.

Closing – 5 minutes

  • Students will turn in their Exit Slip for that day. They will respond to the following prompt:

“Explain a new fact about food tracking that you learned from the presentations today?”

  • Collect the Exit Slip for the day as students leave the classroom


Day Eighteen
Key Question of the Day: (Continuation of Day Seventeen) Which components of each food tracking system worked well?

Bell-Work (Each day the Bell-Work question should be prominently displayed and used to open the lesson)



  • Provide students with the weekly Bell-Work sheet – Appendix 1

“List three things you can do during the presentations to show your classmates respect?”

Learning Objectives:

As a result of this lesson, students will:



  • Compare food tracking systems.

  • Select components of food tracking systems that worked well.

  • Develop a food tracking system to use for the rest of the course.

Required Materials for Daily Lesson

  • Computers

  • Project Presentation Audience Feedback – Appendix 19 – One per student

Estimated Instructional Time: One 50-minute period

Opening – 5 minutes

  • Read the Bell-Work question and solicit responses from the students.

  • If the class is large enough to continue presentations today, introduce any guests, review the presentation procedures, and remind students to have their questions ready to ask each team when they are finished.

Middle – 40 minutes

  • Complete presentations and peer evaluations.

  • Solicit feedback from your expert(s) to begin class discussion about the components of each system that worked well.

    • Teams may refer to their notes.

  • The students will work with the expert to revise their tracking system based on components from the teams’ work. They do not have to represent each team’s work in the final product.

  • Students will write a reflection in their research journals responding to the following questions:

    • How do you feel about the final food tracking system?

    • How well do you think it will work? Why?

Closing – 5 minutes

  • Students will turn in their Exit Slip for that day. They will respond to the following prompt:

“List at least one component or attribute of another team’s food diary that you would like to incorporate into yours.”

  • Collect the Exit Slip for the day as students leave the classroom



Day Nineteen
Key Question of the Day: How do you write a report on your food diary research?

Bell-Work (Each day the Bell-Work question should be prominently displayed and used to open the lesson)



  • Provide students with the weekly Bell-Work sheet – Appendix 1

“What are the key components of a research report?”

Learning Objectives:

As a result of this project, students will:



  • Write a report based on their research.

Required Materials for Daily Lesson

  • Computers

  • RMIT Sample Research Report – Appendix 20 – One per student

  • Research Report Outline – Appendix 21 – One per student

  • Report Rubric – Appendix 22 – One per student

Estimated Instructional Time: One 50-minute periods

Opening – 5 minutes

  • Read the Bell-Work question and solicit responses from the students.

  • Make a list of responses on the board.

  • Have a brief discussion about the expectations for the research report.

  • Explain that, “Now that we have received input from the expert, the final step is to update the food tracking system and create your final report on the entire development process.”

Middle – 40 minutes

  • Distribute RMIT Sample Research Report (Appendix 20) to the students.

  • Students should read the document and underline the components of the report that they think are important.

  • Add these to the class list.

  • Share with students the Research Report Outline (Appendix 21).

    • Remind students about APA format citations and have them use the sample research report to format headings.

    • Give students remainder of day nineteen and all of day twenty to complete their reports.

  • Students should consider the feedback they received on their surveys and from their peers and the nutritionist during their presentation, and address the following questions in their reports.

    • What pieces of the food diary you created worked well?

    • What pieces should be changed? Why?

Closing – 5 minutes

  • Students will turn in their Exit Slip for that day. They will respond to the following prompt:

“What surprised you about people’s reactions to the food diary? What did you think would work better/worse?”

  • Collect the Exit Slip for the day as students leave the classroom

Day Twenty
Key Question of the Day: (Continuation of Day Nineteen) How do you write a report on your food diary research?

Bell-Work (Each day the Bell-Work question should be prominently displayed and used to open the lesson)



  • Provide students with the weekly Bell-Work sheet – Appendix 1

“What questions do you have about your reports?”

Learning Objectives:

As a result of this project, students will:



  • Write a report based on their research.

Required Materials for Daily Lesson

  • Computers

  • RMIT Sample Research Report – Appendix 20 – One per student

  • Research report outline – Appendix 21 – One per student

  • Report Rubric – Appendix 22 – One per student

  • Self-Reflection Form – Appendix 23 – One per student

Estimated Instructional Time: Two 50-minute periods

Opening – 5 minutes

  • Read the Bell-Work question and solicit responses from the students.

  • Answer any questions the students have about the research reports.

Middle – 40 minutes

  • Students should have the rest of this class period to continue working on their research reports.

  • Share with students the Research Report Outline (Appendix 21).

    • Remind students about APA format citations and have them use the sample research report to format headings.

    • Give students remainder of day twenty and day twenty-one (if needed) to complete their reports.

  • Students should consider the feedback they received on their surveys and from their peers and the nutritionist during their presentation, and address the following questions in their reports.

    • What pieces of the food diary you created worked well?

    • What pieces should be changed? Why?

  • When students are finished with their reports, they should complete the self-reflection form (Appendix 23).

  • Next, students will collect their evidence for this project and add it to their portfolio with their captions and descriptions for each item. Portfolios are due to the teacher at the end of the day.

  • The portfolio should include a description and explain that items from each project will be added to the portfolio on the final day of each project and that students will have time to write a reflection statement for each project.



Item

Description













































Closing – 5 minutes

  • Students will turn in their Exit Slip for that day. They will respond to the following prompt:

“What is the most important message you learned from completing this project?”

  • Collect the Exit Slip for the day as students leave the classroom






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