Course 1: Food Production, Nutrition and Health Project: Food for Thought Essential Question



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Day Ten

Key Question of the Day: (Continuation of Day Nine) How do we track our eating?

Bell-Work (Each day the Bell-Work question should be prominently displayed and used to open the lesson)



  • Provide students with the weekly Bell-Work sheet – Appendix 1

“What can you conclude so far about the food tracking systems that are available for consumers?”

Learning Objectives:

As a result of this lesson, students will be able to:



  • Compare systems for tracking eating.

  • Develop a system to track food consumption.

Required Materials for Daily Lesson

  • Computers

  • Internet

Estimated Instructional Time: One 50-minute period

Opening – 5 minutes

  • Read the Bell-Work question and solicit responses from the students.

  • Have a brief discussion about the different systems that are available and the pros and cons of the different resources.

  • Explain that, “Today, you will continue your research and begin to develop a system for tracking eating that aligns with our master list of guidelines. As you develop your food diary, the system can be completely original or it can be a compilation of pieces your team likes from existing systems. The goal is to create a system that will be the most effective tool for the consumer.”

Middle – 40 minutes

  • Teams will continue their research on the food tracking systems.

  • Students should compare each system to the class recommendations list to determine if/how the system is meeting those guidelines.

  • Students should be creative about how they develop a system that can easily be used throughout the day to monitor their eating habits.

    • The tracking system should include a way to track calories in order to determine if their calorie intake hypothesis were accurate.

  • By the end of the class period, each team should have a prototype of their food tracking system and should be able to provide an example to show how the system is used to track food.

    • Explain that a prototype is a preliminary model of something that can help to test a concept.

    • Students should plug in an example of food consumption for a day in order to demonstrate how their tracking method works.

  • Visit each team to check progress and review their examples. Once they have teacher approval on the prototype, bring the class together and have each team share a brief summary of the prototype and why they created it the way they did.

    • Students should ask questions and share any input for each team that might be helpful as they move forward with creating the final version.

  • After the presentations, students can proceed with implementing any edits and planning for the final version.

Closing – 5 minutes

  • Students will turn in their Exit Slip for that day. They will respond to the following prompt:

“How do you think your food tracking system will help consumers in comparison to the resources that already exist?”

  • Collect the Exit Slip for the day as students leave the classroom

  • Homework: Students will use the food diary to track their consumption for the next 24 hours. Students should bring this with them to class the next day, as this data will be used to help them evaluate the validity and accuracy of their food diary before giving it to participants to use.

Day Eleven

Key Question of the Day: How does your eating compare to MyPlate’s recommendations?

Bell-Work (Each day the Bell-Work question should be prominently displayed and used to open the lesson)



  • Provide students with the weekly Bell-Work sheet – Appendix 1

“What conclusions can you make about your food diary entries for the past 24 hours?”

Learning Objectives:

As a result of this lesson, students will be able to:



  • Create a pie chart representing personal eating habits.

  • Compare pie charts of personal eating habits to the MyPlate pie chart.

Required Materials for Daily Lesson

Estimated Instructional Time: One 5- minute period

Opening – 5 minutes

  • Read the Bell-Work question and solicit responses from the students.

  • Next, ask the class to share any surprises about their food tracking experience from the past 24 hours.

  • Ask students to take a look at their food diaries to confirm that they know which MyPlate categories their tracked food items belong to.

  • Explain that, “Now that you’ve had an opportunity to test out the usability of your food tracking system, let’s see where the food items you tracked fall in accordance with the MyPlate guidelines. From there, we’ll focus on finalizing the design of your tracking systems.”

Middle – 40 minutes

  • Students refer to their food diary entries from the past 24 hours.

  • Average the amount of each food category you’ve eaten at each meal. Choose one meal and use its averages to create a pie chart.

  • Using the steps used earlier to create pie charts, create a pie chart that reflects the average for each food category.

  • Discussion:

    • What is the problem with using a pie chart here?

      • Pie charts always show categories as parts of a whole, it doesn’t matter how big the “whole” is as long as all of the pieces add up to 100%

    • What if you eat all of the categories in the correct proportions but eat much more than you should?

      • The pie chart will look good but you will have eaten too much

    • What will happen?

      • You will not have energy balance even though you have eaten the correct proportions

    • So what should we do?

      • Monitor calorie balance and MyPlate to eat the right amount of food and the foods that are good for us

    • Which tool is easier for you to use? Why?

  • Give students about five minutes to meet with their teams to discuss how their food diary worked. They should document notes about any changes they would like to make in their research journals.

  • Ask students to take a look back at the number of calories they hypothesized they would consume in the 24 hour timeframe.

    • In their research journals, each student should write a reflection about what they learned about their perceptions of what they ate in comparison to what they actually ate in a day.

      • Teacher TIP! Since this can be a sensitive topic, don’t ask students to share their answers. If having a class discussion about this, focus on the lessons learned about the importance of being aware of food consumption.

Closing – 5 minutes

  • Students will turn in their Exit Slip for that day. They will respond to the following prompt:

“Are you eating a balanced diet? Why or why not? How can you tell?”

  • Collect the Exit Slip for the day as students leave the classroom



Day Twelve
Key Question of the Day: What does a consumer need to know about using a food diary?

Bell-Work (Each day the Bell-Work question should be prominently displayed and used to open the lesson)



  • Provide students with the weekly Bell-Work sheet – Appendix 1

“What message do you want consumers to know about why they should use your food diary system?”

Learning Objectives:

As a result of this lesson, students will be able to:



  • Identify necessary information for someone to follow their guide.

  • Develop a one page explanation of the diary and how to classify foods.

Required Materials for Daily Lesson

  • Team’s Food Diaries – 20 copies per team

  • Food Diary Survey – Appendix 13 – 20 copies per team

  • Computers with access to Word or other word processing program

Estimated Instructional Time: One 50-minute period

Opening – 5 minutes

  • Read the Bell-Work question and solicit responses from the students.

  • After hearing the responses from the students, ask the class, “Why do we need to provide clear instructions and background information about using your food diary system?”

  • Explain that, “The last step in finalizing your food diary system is to create instructions for how to use the system. Clear instructions are critical so that the consumer understands the purpose of the tool and its intended use.”

Middle – 40 minutes

  • Students should meet with their project teams and develop instructions for using their diary. Be sure to clarify amounts and classifications of foods.

  • The instructions should be no more than one page.

  • This should also be the final opportunity to make any changes necessary to the diary, since the next step is to distribute it for people to use.

  • Next, each team should develop a plan for distributing their diary to at least 20 people who will use it track consumption for 2 days.

    • Each participant will need a copy of the diary, the instructions, and a copy of the Food Diary Survey (Appendix 13).

    • Teacher TIP! The easiest way to do this would be to find as many health classes as you have groups of students and have each class do one group’s diary for 2 days. The teacher will have to make copies of the food diaries for each team in time to distribute before class tomorrow. They will collect them again before class on Day Fifteen. Be sure to tell the participants when the surveys will be collected.

Closing – 5 minutes

  • Students will turn in their Exit Slip for that day. They will respond to the following prompt:

“What are your hopes and expectations for sharing your food diary with the participants?”

  • Collect the Exit Slip for the day as students leave the classroom


Day Thirteen
Key Question of the Day: How should we present information to a group?

Bell-Work (Each day the Bell-Work question should be prominently displayed and used to open the lesson)



  • Provide students with the weekly Bell-Work sheet – Appendix 1

“What are the qualities of a good presentation?”

Learning Objectives:

As a result of this lesson, students will be able to:



  • Explain the structure of a presentation.

  • Describe the kinds of evidence that sway audiences.

Required Materials for Daily Lesson

Estimated Instructional Time: One 50-minute period

Opening – 5 minutes

  • Read the Bell-Work question and solicit responses from the students.

  • Capture the student’s responses and have a brief discussion about why it’s important to understand how to deliver a proper presentation.

  • Explain that, “Today we are going to explore the qualities of a good presentation so that you have the tools needed to prepare for your presentations about your food diaries.”

Middle – 40 minutes

  • Explain the steps of preparing for a good presentation:

    • Develop an outline

    • Develop a good hook

      • Spark audience interest

      • Give a reason to listen

    • Focus on one key point at a time

    • Maximize slide impact

      • Keep minimum amount of text, maximum size

      • Use other visuals with words

      • Avoid clutter

    • Involve the audience

      • Ask them questions

    • Include all required components

    • Summarize the main points at the end

    • Assign roles within the team

    • Practice, practice, practice!

  • Following this discussion, teams will develop an outline for their presentation to the class and nutrition expert.

    • Remind them that their purpose is to use the evidence they are collecting about their food diary and the diary itself to convince the class and the nutrition expert to select their diary to be used for the rest of the year. They must use their background research on healthy eating habits and the data they collect in their surveys to support their stance about their food diary.

  • Students can use PowerPoint, Prezi, or other similar means to create an electronic visual for their presentations.

  • For the last 5 minutes of class, distribute the Mean Pre-Test (Appendix 14).

    • Teacher TIP! Review this pre-test before class tomorrow to identify common errors and misconceptions and create homogenous pairs for tomorrow based on misconceptions. Do not score and return pre-tests; they are just to inform you about the students’ existing knowledge.

  • Students will complete the pre-tests and turn them in.

Closing – 5 minutes

  • Students will turn in their Exit Slip for that day. They will respond to the following prompt:

“List the characteristics of a good audience member.”

  • Collect the Exit Slip for the day as students leave the classroom


Day Fourteen

(optional, cut if class does well on pre-test and go to Day Fifteen)

Key Question of the Day: How do we calculate mean responses? Why do we use mean responses?

Bell-Work (Each day the Bell-Work question should be prominently displayed and used to open the lesson)



  • Provide students with the weekly Bell-Work sheet – Appendix 1

“In mathematics, what is the mean?”

Learning Objectives:

As a result of this lesson, students will be able to:



  • Calculate mean.

  • Explain why one uses mean responses.

Required Materials for Daily Lesson

  • Calculators

  • Calculating Means Practice – Appendix 15 – One per student

  • Calculating Mean Slips – Appendix 16 – One per student

Estimated Instructional Time: One 50- minute period

Opening – 5 minutes

  • Read the Bell-Work question and solicit responses from the students.

  • Capture responses on the board.

  • Put students in their assigned homogenous pairs and give each pair a set of Calculating means slips (Appendix 16).

  • Give students time to match the calculated means or equation to the correct set of numbers.

  • Monitor groups and allow students to work until they have worked through some of their misconceptions.

  • Explain that, “As we prepare to receive the survey data about our food diaries, we need to understand how to calculate the mean so that we can accurately analyze the data and draw conclusions.”

Middle – 40 minutes

  • Provide the definition, “A mean ( is a numerical average. It tells you the average of a set of numbers. To calculate it, you take the sum ( of all of the numbers (x) in a set ( divided by the amount of numbers in the set (n).”

Equation
Example 1:

You have mowed lawns for the neighbors for several months and earned a different amount each month. You want to know the mean amount of money you have earned each month based on the following earnings:



Month

Amount earned

April

$55

May

$80

June

$130

July

$150

August

$110

September

$75

Equation: = $100




  • Students complete Calculating Means Practice (Appendix 15) with their partner.

  • Explain the following, “Let’s try an example from your survey data. Each item on your survey has a numerical answer. Your participants circled a number under the headings Strongly Disagree to Strongly Agree for each item. You can calculate an average for each item to determine, overall, how your participants felt about the item.”

  • Have one team read you the numerical responses to one item from all of their surveys and write them on the board.

  • Ask each student to write out their equation based on the given numbers. Check with a neighbor.

  • Visit each team to check their equations as they work out any differences with their partner.

  • Have students calculate the mean and have each pair post their equation and answer on the board.

  • Work through the equations and answers together to show them the correct equation and answer.

  • Have each team break into pairs or threes. Assign one pair/threesome the even numbers from their surveys and the other pair the odd numbers and have them calculate the mean score for each of their assigned items.

  • Return to whole groups and check their answers with the other pair/threesome.

  • Match these scores to the category (Strongly Disagree to Strongly Agree). These are the scores students will use in their presentations about their food diary.

  • Use a few examples from the groups to demonstrate for the class. (e.g, A mean score of 4.2 means that the student agreed with the statement that the diary was easy to use).
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