August 2014 Commonwealth of Australia 2014



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Glossary


Clinician – A person who spends the majority of their time working in the area of clinical practice, that is, the diagnosis, care and treatment (including recommended preventative action) of patients or clients. Clinical practice may involve direct client contact or may be practiced indirectly through individual case material (for example, a dental technician).

Comparison scenario – A scenario where current trends are assumed to continue into the future. This is compared with a range of alternative scenarios.

Employed – a practitioner who reported working in their profession in the week before the survey. In this report, data on employed practitioners include those who:

  • Worked for a total of one hour or more in the week before the survey in a job or business (including own business) for pay, commission, payment in kind or profit.

  • Usually worked, but were on leave for less than three months, on strike or locked out, or rostered off.

Full-time equivalent (FTE) – The model calculates FTE on a per role basis based on the initial headcount in these workforces, multiplied by their reported hours worked. This is then divided by a standardized assumption about what constitutes a single FTE across the workforces modelled (38 hours per week) to generate the FTE quantity.

International dental graduate (IDG) – Dentists whose basic dental qualifications were acquired in a country other than Australia

International students – Private or sponsored students in an Australian university who are not Australian citizens or permanent residents.

Registered workforce – Those dental professions which are regulated under the National Registration and Accreditation Scheme – dentists, dental specialists, oral health therapists, dental hygienists, and dental therapists.

References


1 On 1 July 2010 the National Registration and Accreditation Scheme commenced, which saw a number of health professions become national regulated by a corresponding Board. The Dental Board of Australia registers dentists, students, dental specialists, dental therapists, dental hygienists, oral health therapists and dental prosthetists.

1 National Advisory Committee on Oral Health for the Australian Health Ministers’ Conference 2004. Healthy Mouths Healthy Lives: Australia’s National Oral Health Plan 2004-2013. Adelaide: South Australian Department of Health.

2 Chrisopoulos S & Harford JE 2013. Oral health and dental care in Australia: key facts and figures 2012. Cat. No. DEN 224. Canberra: AIHW.

3 Ibid

4 Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2014. Dental workforce 2012. National health workforce series no.7. Cat. no. HWL 53. Canberra: AIHW

5 Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2012. Australia’s health 2012. Australia’s health series no.13. Cat. no. AUS 156. Canberra: AIHW.

6 National Advisory Committee on Oral Health for the Australian Health Ministers’ Conference 2004. Healthy Mouths Healthy Lives: Australia’s National Oral Health Plan 2004-2013. Adelaide: South Australian Department of Health.

7 Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2013. Health expenditure Australia 2011–12. Health and welfare expenditure series no. 50. Cat. no. HWE 59. Canberra: AIHW.

8 Department of Health 2012. Report of the National Advisory Council on Dental Health. Accessed 15 January 2014.

9 Ibid

10 Department of Health website. Accessed 15 April 2014.

11 Ibid

12 Haas M & Anderson R 2005. ‘Access to dental care in Australia’ [PDF, 125 KB]. Health Policy Monitor. Accessed 18 March 2014.

13 Health Workforce Australia 2013: HW 2025 - Oral Health, Supply and Demand Methodology. Adelaide: HWA.

14 AIHW Dental Statistics and Research Unit 2003. Demand for Dental Care [PDF, 750 KB]. Accessed 18 March 2014.

15 National Advisory Committee on Oral Health for the Australian Health Ministers’ Conference 2004. Healthy Mouths Healthy Lives: Australia’s National Oral Health Plan 2004-2013. Adelaide: South Australian Department of Health.

16 Insight Economics 2013. Demand for Dental Services in Australia [PDF, 750 KB]. Accessed 18 March 2014.

17 Ibid.

18 Harford JE, Ellershaw AC & Spencer AJ 2011. Trends in access to dental care among Australian adults 1994–2008. Dental statistics and research series no. 55. Cat. no. DEN 204. Canberra: AIHW.

19 Crocombe LA, Broadbent JM, Thomson WM, Brennan DS & Poulton R 2012. ‘Impact of dental visiting trajectory patterns on clinical oral health and oral health-related quality of life’. Journal of Public Health Dentistry, 72(1):36–44.

20 McGrath C & Bedi R 2001. ‘Can dental attendance improve quality of life?’ British Dental Journal, 190(5):262–265.

21 AIHW, Harford JE & Islam S 2013. Adult oral health and dental visiting in Australia: results from the National Dental Telephone Interview Survey 2010. Dental statistics and research series 65. Cat. No. DEN227. Canberra: AIHW.

22 Crocombe LA, Broadbent JM, Thomson WM, Brennan DS & Poulton R 2012. ‘Impact of dental visiting trajectory patterns on clinical oral health and oral health-related quality of life’. Journal of Public Health Dentistry, 72(1):36–44.

23 Spencer AJ 2001. What options do we have for organizing, providing and funding better public dental care? Sydney: The Australian Health Policy Institute.

24 Ha D 2011. Dental decay among Australian children. AIHW Dental statistics and research unit research report no. 53. Cat. No. DEN210. Canberra: AIHW.

25 Ibid.

26 Ibid.

27 Harford JE & Luzzi L 2013. Child and teenager oral health and dental visiting: Results from the National Dental Telephone Interview Survey 2010. Dental statistics and research series no. 64. Cat. no DEN 226. Canberra: AIHW.

28 Chrisopoulos S & Harford JE 2013. Oral health and dental care in Australia: key facts and figures

2012. Cat. no. DEN 224. Canberra: AIHW.



29 Ibid.

30 Ibid.

31 Haas M & Anderson R 2005. . ‘Access to dental care in Australia’ [PDF, 125 KB].. Health Policy Monitor. Accessed 18 March 2014.

32Chrisopoulos S & Harford JE 2013. Oral health and dental care in Australia: key facts and figures

2012. Cat. no. DEN 224. Canberra: AIHW.



33 Ibid.

34 Ibid.

35 Ibid.

36 National Advisory Committee on Oral Health for the Australian Health Ministers’ Conference 2004. Healthy Mouths Healthy Lives: Australia’s National Oral Health Plan 2004-2013. Adelaide: South Australian Department of Health.

37 Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2012. Chronic conditions and oral health. Dental statistics and research unit research report no. 56. Cat. No. DEN 221. Canberra: AIHW.

38 Australian Dental Association 2007. Oral health and people with special needs [PDF, 750 KB]. Accessed 18 March 2014.

39 Chrisopoulos S & Harford JE 2013. Oral health and dental care in Australia: key facts and figures

2012. Cat. no. DEN 224. Canberra: AIHW.



40 Ibid.

41 Ibid.

42 Spencer AJ & Harford J 2008. Improving oral health and dental care for Australians [PDF, 750 KB]. Accessed 18 March 2014.

43 McGrath C & Bedi R 2001. ‘Can dental attendance improve quality of life?’ British Dental Journal, 190(5):262–265.

44 AIHW, Harford JE & Islam S 2013. Adult oral health and dental visiting in Australia: results from the National Dental Telephone Interview Survey 2010. Dental statistics and research series 65. Cat. No. DEN227. Canberra: AIHW.

45 Health Workforce Australia 2012. Health Workforce 2025 - Doctors, Nurses and Midwives – Volume 1. Adelaide: HWA.

46 Health Workforce Australia 2012. Health Workforce 2025 – Doctors, Nurses and Midwives – Volume 2. Adelaide: HWA.

47 Health Workforce Australia 2012. Health Workforce 2025 - Medical Specialties – Volume 3. Adelaide: HWA.
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