Appendix 2-5: Rejected ecotox bibliography for Chlorpyrifos



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trimethyltin chloride (TMT), methyl mercury chloride (MeHgCl), parathion or paraoxon, and with 0.1-100 mM of ethanol for up to 100 min. TMT (10 mu M), MeHgCl (1 mu M) and ethanol (100 mM) all decreased the amplitude of evoked field potential. The effect of ethanol was reversible. In contrast paraoxon (10 mu M) increased the amplitudes of evoked field potentials while parathion showed no significant effects. The effects of TMT and ethanol on the frequency of spontaneous activity were consistent with those obtained for evoked field potentials. All effects occurred at levels at which cytotoxic injuries were not detectable. Taken together our system expressed electrophysiological properties similar to those of established slice culture preparations. It detected known neurotoxicants at subcytotoxic levels and therefore appears suitable for the assessment of toxic insults specifically interfering with nervous system function, e.g. neuronal activity, synaptic transmission and short-term plasticity. If incorporated into testing strategies, it might represent a valuable tool for the mechanistic assessment of neurotoxic effects. (c) 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Keywords: In vitro, aggregating brain cell cultures, multi-electrode array, neural
ISI Document Delivery No.: 239SJ

1419. van Wendel de Joode, Berna; Barraza, Douglas; Ruepert, Clemens; Mora, Ana Mar+ a; C+¦rdoba, Leonel; +ûberg, Mattias; Wesseling, Catharina; Mergler, Donna, and Lindh, Christian H. Indigenous children living nearby plantations with chlorpyrifos-treated bags have elevated 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy) urinary concentrations. 2012 Aug; 117, (0): 17-26.


Rec #: 290
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Background Children/ Pesticides/ Chlorpyrifos/ Biomarkers/ Banana/ Developing countries

1420. Varshney, M. K.; Rastogi, S.; Khan, S. A., and Trikha, V. Is Sclerotherapy Better Than Intralesional Excision for Treating Aneurysmal Bone Cysts?


Rec #: 50569
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
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ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Minimally invasive approaches such as sclerotherapy have been introduced to treat aneurysmal bone cysts. Sclerotherapy has been associated with reasonable healing rates during the past two decades. However, it is unclear whether sclerotherapy compares with the more traditional extended curettage and bone grafting.
ABSTRACT: QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: We therefore compared the healing rates and functional scores in patients having percutaneous repetitive sclerotherapy using polidocanol (Group 1) with those with intralesional excision (extended curettage with a high-speed burr) and bone grafting (Group 2) for treatment of aneurysmal bone cyst.
ABSTRACT: PATIENTS AND METHODS: We randomly divided 94 patients into two treatment groups. We assessed healing rates (primary outcome measure), pain relief, time to healing and recurrence, hospital stay, and the Enneking functional score. Forty-five patients from Group 1 and 46 from Group 2 were available for study. The minimum followup was 3.2 years (mean, 4.4 years; range, 3.2-6.1 years).
ABSTRACT: RESULTS: At last followup, 93.3% in Group 1 and 84.8% in Group 2 had achieved healing. Complications in Group 1 were minor and resolved. In Group 2, three patients had deep infections and five had superficial infections, and two had growth disturbances. Although the healing rates were similar, we found higher rates of clinically important complications, worse functional outcomes, and higher hospital burden associated with intralesional excision.
ABSTRACT: CONCLUSIONS: Repetitive sclerotherapy using polidocanol is a minimally invasive, safer method of treatment for aneurysmal bone cysts compared with intralesional excision and bone grafting. In this preliminary study, we found similar recurrence rates for the two treatment methods, however, this will require confirmation in larger studies.
ABSTRACT: LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level II, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
MESH HEADINGS: Adolescent
MESH HEADINGS: Adult
MESH HEADINGS: Bone Cysts, Aneurysmal/physiopathology/radiography/surgery/*therapy
MESH HEADINGS: *Bone Transplantation/adverse effects
MESH HEADINGS: Child
MESH HEADINGS: *Curettage/adverse effects
MESH HEADINGS: Female
MESH HEADINGS: Humans
MESH HEADINGS: Length of Stay
MESH HEADINGS: Logistic Models
MESH HEADINGS: Male
MESH HEADINGS: Pain Measurement
MESH HEADINGS: Pain, Postoperative/prevention &
MESH HEADINGS: control
MESH HEADINGS: Polyethylene Glycols/adverse effects/*therapeutic use
MESH HEADINGS: Recovery of Function
MESH HEADINGS: Recurrence
MESH HEADINGS: Risk Assessment
MESH HEADINGS: Risk Factors
MESH HEADINGS: Sclerosing Solutions/adverse effects/*therapeutic use
MESH HEADINGS: *Sclerotherapy/adverse effects
MESH HEADINGS: Time Factors
MESH HEADINGS: Treatment Outcome
MESH HEADINGS: Wound Healing
MESH HEADINGS: Young Adult eng

1421. Vasquez-Castro, J. A.; de Baptista, G. C.; Junior, C. D. G., and Trevizan, L. R. P. Effect of spray volume on the moisture of stored corn and wheat grains. 2008; 51, (3): 453-456.


Rec #: 71129
Keywords: FOOD
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: The goal of this work was to evaluate the effect of spray volume on the moisture of the stored grains of the corn and wheat. Two kg of each type of the grain were placed into the plastic bags and sprayed with the theoretical doses of 0, 1, 3, 5, 8, and 10 liters of water / ton of the grain. The grain moisture content was evaluated 24 h after the spray operation by the oven method. The increase in the grain moisture was quadratic and showed the same trend in both the corn and wheat. The grain moisture after spraying 10 L.t(-1) showed little increase (0.8%) as compared to the initial moisture content. Thus, the application of any spray volume as used in this study made no difference for a possible better uniformity in the distribution of insecticide throughout the sprayed material.
Keywords: stored products, chemical control, application technology, desorption,
ISI Document Delivery No.: 330ZY

1422. Vega, L.; Valverde, M.; Elizondo, G.; Leyva, J. F., and Rojas, E. Diethylthiophosphate and diethyldithiophosphate induce genotoxicity in hepatic cell lines when activated by further biotransformation via Cytochrome P450. 2009; 679, (1-2): 39-43.


Rec #: 71189
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Organophosphorous (OP) compounds are the most commonly used pesticides. There are several published reports on the direct toxicity of OP pesticides, but few data on the toxicity of their metabolites. To determine if diethylthiophosphate (DETP) and diethyldithiophosphate (DEDTP), two of the major OP metabolites, demonstrate genotoxicity, and to elucidate the possible genotoxic mechanisms, we treated WRL68, HepG2, HeLa and human blood cells with different concentrations of DETP and DEDTP. We evaluated the possible contribution of oxidative stress generation and P450 enzymes to the genotoxicity of the OP metabolites, as determined using the comet assay. Our results showed that both OP metabolites (DETP and DEDTP) induce DNA damage only in the hepatic cell lines, and this effect could be related to a secondary non-diffusible metabolite generated by the activity of P450 enzymes since P450 enzyme inhibitors also inhibited the induction of DNA damage in hepatic cells. These secondary metabolites should be taken into account when assessing risk to human populations exposed to OP pesticides. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Keywords: Organophosphorous pesticide metabolites, DNA damage, Sulconazole,
ISI Document Delivery No.: 523JO

1423. Venerosi, A.; Ricceri, L.; Tait, S., and Calamandrei, G. Sex dimorphic behaviors as markers of neuroendocrine disruption by environmental chemicals: The case of chlorpyrifos . 2012; 33, (6): 1420-1426.


Rec #: 71239
Keywords: REVIEW
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: The complexity of the neuroendocrine level of investigation requires the assessment of behavioral patterns that extend beyond the reproductive functions, which are age- and sex-specific in rodents, described by defined clusters of behavioral items regulated by genetic, hormonal, and epigenetic factors. The study of social behavior in laboratory rodents reveals sex-dimorphic effects of environmental chemicals that may be undetected either by a traditional neurotoxicological approach or referring to the classical definition of endocrine disrupting chemicals. Here we review data on the neurobehavioral effects of developmental exposure to the non-persistent organophosphorus insecticide chlorpyrifos, whose neurotoxic activity at low doses is currently a matter of concern for children's health. In mice exposed to chlorpyrifos in utero and/or in early development social/emotional responses are differently affected in the two sexes in parallel with sex-dependent interference on hypothalamic neuroendocrine pathways regulating social behaviors (vasopressin, oxytocin, and steroid regulated systems). Through the analysis of complex sex-dimorphic behavioral patterns we show that neurotoxic and endocrine disrupting activities of CPF overlap. This widely diffused organophosphorus pesticide might thus be considered as a neuroendocrine disruptor possibly representing a risk factor for sex-biased neurodevelopmental disorders in children. (C) 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos, Social behavior, Anxiety, Oxytocin, Vasopressin, Steroids,
ISI Document Delivery No.: 063UI

1424. Venkateswarlu, P.; Mohan, K. R.; Kumar, C. R., and Seshaiah, K. Monitoring of multi-class pesticide residues in fresh grape samples using liquid chromatography with electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. 2007; 105, (4): 1760-1766.


Rec #: 71249
Keywords: SURVEY
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: A sensitive and selective liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS-MS) method was developed for the routine analysis of 10 multi-class pesticides residues (imidacloprid, thiamethoxam, chlorpyrifos, dimethoate, monocrotophos, metalaxyl, methomyl, hexaconazole, myclobutanil, carbendazim) in fresh grape samples. A miniaturized extraction-partition procedure that requires small amounts of non-chlorinated solvents was used. The extracts were analyzed by LC-ESI-MS-MS without any further cleanup step. The pesticides are separated on a reversed phase non-polar column using a gradient elution. Mean recoveries obtained at fortification levels of 0.010-0.100 mg/kg were 78-104% for all compounds, with relative standard deviations (RSDs) of <= 15%. The LC-MS-MS method allowed sensitive and selective quantification and identification at low levels in different matrices. The method was applied for analysis of fresh grape samples collected from an agricultural area in Hyderabad, South India. The results revealed that the concentrations of studied pesticide residues in grape samples were in the permissible limits except monocrotophos. (C) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keywords: pesticide residues, grapes, non-chlorinated solvents, LC-ESI-MS-MS
ISI Document Delivery No.: 204XV

1425. Ventura, C.; N+¦+_ez, M. A.; Gaido, V.; Lamas, D. Martinel; Randi, A. S.; Venturino, A.; Rivera, E. S., and Cocca, C. M. Effects of chlorpyrifos on growth of estrogen-dependent human breast cancer cell line: Abstracts of the 47th Congress of the European Societies of Toxicology (EUROTOX). 2011 Aug 28-; 205, Supplement, (0): S80.


Rec #: 2530
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY

1426. Ventura, Clara; N+¦+_ez, Mariel; Miret, Noelia; Martinel Lamas, Diego; Randi, Andrea; Venturino, Andr+ s; Rivera, Elena, and Cocca, Claudia . Differential mechanisms of action are involved in chlorpyrifos effects in estrogen-dependent or -independent breast cancer cells exposed to low or high concentrations of the pesticide. 2012 Sep 3-; 213, (2): 184-193.


Rec #: 1630
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: It has reported that many environmental compounds may display estrogenic actions and these findings led to researchers to associate breast cancer risk with the use of some pesticides. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of chlorpyrifos (CPF) on cell proliferation and the ER+_-dependence of this action employing MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. We have also analyzed CPF action on the cell cycle distribution and the cyclins that are implicated in G1-S and intra-S checkpoints. Finally, the action on cell death and ROS production were studied. We demonstrated the ability of CPF 0.05 ++M to induce cell proliferation through ER+_ in hormone-dependent breast cancer cells. In contrast, CPF 50 ++M induces intra-S arrest modifying checkpoints proteins, through a mechanism that may involve changes in redox balance in MCF-7. In MDA-MB-231, we have found that CPF 50 ++M produces an arrest in G2/M phase which could be related to the capacity of the pesticide for binding to tubulin sites altering microtubules polymerization. Altogether, our results provide new evidences on the action of the pesticide CPF as an environmental breast cancer risk factor due to the effects that causes on the mechanisms that modulate breast cell proliferation. Chlorpyrifos/ Cell proliferation/ Endocrine disruptors/ Cell death/ Breast cancer cells

1427. Ventura, F. D.; de Oliveira, J.; Pedreira, W. D., and Ribeiro, M. G. GC-MS quantification of organophosphorous pesticides extracted from XAD-2 sorbent tube and foam patch matrices. 2012; 4, (11): 3666-3673.


Rec #: 71269
Keywords: CHEM METHODS
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: This work presents a simple extraction procedure and a sensitive and simultaneous gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for quantifying five organophosphorous pesticides - chlorpyrifos, dichlorvos, fenchlorphos, parathion-methyl and prothiofos - currently used in flower and ornamental plant greenhouses, extracted from polyurethane foam dermal patches and sampling tubes packed with XAD-2 sorbent and quartz fiber filter. Analytical performance of the optimized method was evaluated taking into account specificity, selectivity, sensitivity, linearity, matrix effects, recovery and repeatability. Extraction procedures were made by addition of pure toluene to the spiked matrices, followed by gentle stirring or ultrasonic bath immersion. Analytes were eluted with a good resolution between 3.4 min and 13.1 min. Linearity responses were determined within the ranges of 25-550 mu g L(-1) for XAD-2 (R(2) > 0.990) and 40-320 mu g L(-1) for PUF (R(2) > 0.990). The ANOVA for linear regression (p < 0.001), White test for homoscedasticity (p > 0.05) and t-test for fitting parameters (p < 0.001) indicated that the linear regression model provides a good interpolation of the experimental data. LOD and LOQ values were below 15.70 eta g per sample and 47.56 hg per sample, respectively. Recoveries ranged from 81.17% to 114.48% with RSD <5%. The absence of significant matrix effects was statistically demonstrated by applying an F-test of equality of variances (p > 0.05), and a two sample t-test assuming equal variances (p > 0.05). The optimized method represents a useful tool for quantification of pesticides at low concentration levels for occupational matrices, allowing the future evaluation of occupational exposure from both inhaling and dermal routes.
Keywords: CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY, POTENTIAL DERMAL EXPOSURE,
ISI Document Delivery No.: 026MA

1428. Verma, Anoop; Poonam, and Dixit, Divya. Photocatalytic Degradability of Insecticide Chlorpyrifos Over Uv Irradiated Titanium Dioxide in Aqueous Phase. 2012; 3, (2): 743-755.


Rec #: 39139
Keywords: FATE
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Photocatalytic degradation of Chlorpyrifos in aqueous phase by using photocatalyst TiO^sub 2^ in the presence of artificial UV-light and sunlight was reported. Experiments were performed in both UV and solar light at optimized conditions. The degradation of insecticide was investigated in terms of reduction in COD. The effect of catalyst loading, pH, addition of oxidant on the reaction rate was ascertained and optimum conditions for maximum degradation were determined. In this case catalyst concentration was optimized at 4.0 gL^sup -1^, pH 6.5 and oxidant concentration at 3.0 gL^sup -1^, where 90% degradation of the insecticide was observed. Treatment under natural solar conditions showed better results as compared with UV treatment. The effect of sonication on the catalyst slurry was also studied for the better dispersion of the catalyst. The complete mineralization of pesticide from water or waste water followed first-order Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) kinetic model. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]
Keywords: Environmental Studies
Copyright - Copyright Integrated Publishing Association 2012
Language of summary - English
Pages - 743-755
ProQuest ID - 1269083085
Document feature - Illustrations; Equations; Graphs; References
Last updated - 2013-01-14
Place of publication - Kangayam
Corporate institution author - Verma, Anoop; Poonam; Dixit, Divya
DOI - 2864339521; 74748492; 149129; NJVS; INNNNJVS0001136462
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1. Abo-Farha, S.A., (2010), Photocatalytic Degradation of Monoazo and Diazo dyes in wastewaaer on nanometer-sized TiO2', Journal of American science, 6(2) pp 130-142.
AbramovicĂŚ, Biljana F., Anderluh, Vesna B. 2004 "Titanium dioxide mediated photocatalytic degradation of 3-amino-2-chloropyridine" Applied Catalysis B: Environmental 48 3 213-221
Affam, Augustine Chioma, Kutty, Shamsul Rahman M 2012 "Solar Photo-Fenton Induced Degradation of Combined Chlorpyrifos, Cypermethrin and Chlorothalonil Pesticides in Aqueous Solution" Proceedings of World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology 62 82-88
Dubey, Shashi Kant, Srivastava, Paritosh 2009 "Solar photo-catalytic treatment of textile wastewater for biodegradability enhancement" International Journal of Environmental Engineering 1 2 152-164
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1429. Verstappen, D. R. W.; Hulst, A. G.; Fidder, A.; Vermeulen, N. P. E., and Noort, D. Interactions of organophosphates with keratins in the cornified epithelium of human skin. 2012; 197, (2-3): 93-102.


Rec #: 71339
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Methods to unequivocally assess and quantify exposure to organophosphate anti-cholinesterase agents are highly valuable, either from a biomonitoring or a forensic perspective. Since for both OP pesticides and various nerve agents the skin is a predominant route of entry, we hypothesized that proteins in the skin might represent an ideal source of unequivocal and persistent biomarkers for exposure to these compounds. In this exploratory study we show that keratin proteins in human skin are relevant binding sites for organophosphates. The thick cornified epithelium of human plantar skin (callus) was exposed to a selection of relevant organophosphorus compounds and keratin proteins were subsequently extracted. After carboxymethylation of cysteine residues, enzymatic digestion of the keratins with pronase and trypsin was performed and the resulting amino acid and peptides were analyzed to assess whether covalent adducts had formed. LC-tandem MS analysis of the pronase digests demonstrated that tyrosine and to a lesser extent serine residues were selectively modified by organophosphate pesticides (both phosphorothioates and the corresponding oxon forms) under physiological conditions. In addition, modification of tyrosine with the nerve agent VX was unequivocally assessed. In order to elucidate specific binding sites, LC-tandem MS analysis of trypsin digests showed two separate tryptic keratin fragments, i.e. LASY*LDK and SLY*GLGGSK, with Y* the modified tyrosine residues, originating from keratin 1/6 and keratin 10, respectively. These preliminary findings, revealing novel binding targets for anti-cholinesterase organophosphates, will form a firm basis for the development of novel (non-invasive) methods for assessment of exposure to organophosphates. Whether this binding will also have biological implications remains an issue for further investigations. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keywords: Adducts, Biomarkers, Keratin, Nerve agents, Organophosphates, Pesticides
ISI Document Delivery No.: 956PL

1430. Villaverde, J; Hildebrandt, a; Martinez, E; Lacorte, S; Morillo, E; Maqueda, C; Viana, P; Barcelo, D, and Villaverde, J. Priority Pesticides and Their Degradation Products in River Sediments From Portugal. 2008 Feb 15; 390, (2-3): 507-513.


Rec #: 49739
Keywords: FATE
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: A multiresidue gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method was developed to determine 28 priority pesticides of different chemical families (organochlorine, organophosphorus, triazines, anilides) together with some of their transformation products in river sediment. Ultrasonic, Soxhlet and pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) methods were compared in spiking experiments using acetone:hexane (1:1) followed by alumina solid phase extraction cartridges or in-cell alumina clean-up for PLE. All extraction techniques produced acceptable recoveries for the pesticides under study, although Soxhlet extraction produced the lowest recoveries for 2,4-DDE, trifluralin, lindane, and hexachlorobenzene (<50%) whereas ultrasonic extraction resulted in low recoveries for hexachlorobenzene and lindane (<50%). However, PLE using in-cell alumina clean-up produced an overestimation of more apolar compounds, given the amount of coextracted compounds. Limits of detection at the low kg L super(-) super(1)-ng L super(-) super(1) levels were obtained with Soxhlet and ultrasonic extraction, while PLE produced higher variability due to the lack of exhaustive clean-up. Given the simplicity of ultrasonic extraction, this method was further employed to determine target compounds in river sediments collected in Portugal. Lindane was detected in practically all samples, followed by trace levels of the pesticides simazine, diazinon, fenitrothion, and parathion-methyl.
Keywords: Molecular structure
Keywords: Portugal
Keywords: Q5 01503:Characteristics, behavior and fate
Keywords: Variability
Keywords: Organochlorine compounds
Keywords: Degradation
Keywords: Fluvial Sediments
Keywords: SW 3030:Effects of pollution
Keywords: Q2 02264:Sediments and sedimentation
Keywords: Freshwater
Keywords: Environmental Studies
Keywords: Agricultural Chemicals
Keywords: Rivers
Keywords: Sediment chemistry
Keywords: Sediment pollution
Keywords: Chlorine compounds
Keywords: P 2000:FRESHWATER POLLUTION
Keywords: Simazine
Keywords: ASFA 2: Ocean Technology Policy & Non-Living Resources; ASFA 3: Aquatic Pollution & Environmental Quality; Pollution Abstracts; Aqualine Abstracts; Water Resources Abstracts
Keywords: Lindane
Keywords: Herbicides
Keywords: AQ 00003:Monitoring and Analysis of Water and Wastes
Keywords: Sediments
Keywords: Spectrometry
Keywords: Ultrasonics
Keywords: Pesticides
Keywords: Priorities
Keywords: Trifluralin
Keywords: Organic Compounds
Keywords: Diazinon
Keywords: Pollution control
Keywords: Hexachlorobenzene
Date revised - 2012-09-01
Language of summary - English
Location - Portugal
Pages - 507-513
ProQuest ID - 289900199
SubjectsTermNotLitGenreText - Rivers; Molecular structure; Sediment chemistry; Sediment pollution; Degradation; Ultrasonics; Chlorine compounds; Pesticides; Sediments; Pollution control; Organochlorine compounds; Trifluralin; Herbicides; Simazine; Lindane; Diazinon; Spectrometry; Hexachlorobenzene; Variability; Agricultural Chemicals; Fluvial Sediments; Priorities; Organic Compounds; Portugal; Freshwater
Last updated - 2012-11-08
Corporate institution author - Villaverde, J; Hildebrandt, A; Martinez, E; Lacorte, S; Morillo, E; Maqueda, C; Viana, P; Barcelo, D
DOI - OB-MD-0008081754; 8183199; CS0820511; 0048-9697 English

1431. Visan, Anke; Hayess, Katrin; Sittner, Dana; Pohl, Elena E.; Riebeling, Christian; Slawik, Birgitta; Gulich, Konrad; Oelgeschl+ńger, Michael; Luch, Andreas, and Seiler, Andrea E. M. Neural differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells as a tool to assess developmental neurotoxicity in vitro. 2012 Oct; 33, (5): 1135-1146.


Rec #: 4520
Keywords: IN VITRO
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) represent an attractive cellular system for in vitro studies in developmental biology as well as toxicology because of their potential to differentiate into all fetal cell lineages.
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