6 Basics about Brazil’s Media Market



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6 Basics about Brazil’s Media Market

By Bruno Almeida@US Media Consulting on June 30, 2011in Brazil, Media, Online, OOH, Print, TV

Brazil is big these days. No surprise there: a spiking GDP, 190 million potential customers and a well-developed media market are getting lots of attention. You also can advertise there and make money without a local presence. These basics on the country’s media market will give you a sense of the potential rewards and challenges.



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#1 Brazil’s media market is big. And small. While there are lots of media choices, only 7 firms control 80% of what’s read, heard or seen in Brazil. Organizações Globo rules TV, film and radio and is competitive in print and web media. It commands around 75% of Brazilian TV ad spending. Beyond free TV, Globo’s has interests in Net Serviços, the country’s largest cable company, and SKY, the largest satellite dish company. In print, Abril produces 73% of the highest-selling magazines in the country.

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Domingão do Faustão is one of Brazil's top shows.



#2 TV still rules the media mix. This medium has the most penetration in Brazil (over 90%) and commands 60% of the overall ad spend. Other forms of media lag way behind, with newspapers a distant second at 12.7%. This is markedly different from the U.S., the U.K. and even Argentina, in which TV dominates but other forms of media don’t lag as far behind. Brazil is closer to Mexico in this sense, where 76% of ad investment goes to TV.

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#3 Magazines are an emerging force. Circulation has been rising since 2005, spiking 7% in 2010. Biweeklies saw the biggest growth at 21%, followed by 8.1% for the weeklies and nearly 5% for the monthlies. The U.S.’s Condé Nast recently launched a joint venture with Globo, Brazil’s biggest media conglomerate, to create a new company. Edições Globo-Condé Nast will launch popular Condé Nast titles in Brazil, including Vogue.

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#4 Online is gaining ground. Brazil has 73 million Internet users, the 8th largest Internet audience in the world according to comScore. Often, 43 million is the figure reported, but that doesn’t factor in the many users at LAN houses in the country. ComScore’s calculations take that into account.
Since the country’s overall population is 190 million, this means there’s a 38% penetration rate. Not as deep as that of the United States or European countries, but this is changing quickly. The amount of Brazilian Internet users grew by 20% in 2010 and research firm Forrester’s estimates that it will grow 18% a year between 2011 and 2016. E-commerce grew by 40% in Brazil in 2010 and Forrester’s projects it will grow 178% by 2016 to reach US$22 billion. Seven out of 10 online Brazilians visited a retail site in December 2010, with Mercado Livre, Lojas Americanas and BuscaPe boasting the most uniques. Group-buying sites like Clubeurbano attracted 50% more unique users between August and October 2010. And banking giants Itau and Banco do Brasil each had a 50% growth in uniques during 2010. For its part, Brazilian portal iG draws in more than 29 million uniques a month.

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#5 OOH is a power performer. Laws restricting billboards in Sao Paulo and Rio did nothing to stop the message getting out. Agencies just got more creative, using projections onto buildings, plasma screens in restaurants and digital panels in airports and malls to reach the audience. And it worked. That’s why out of home (OOH) ad investment shot up by 16% in 2010 to reach US$464 million. Digital OOH ad investment is growing particularly quickly in Brazil. It went up by 58% in 2010 and is projected to grow by another 60% in 2011 to reach $147 million.

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#6 For print, consider buys with niche titles. The top two socioeconomic classes in Brazil are A and B, followed by class C, a lower middle class, then the poorer classes, D and E. Around 6 million people are expected to move from class C to class B in 2011 as the economy expands and government programs target poverty. One tendency of the emerging classes in Brazil is to consume more media, particularly magazines. In fact, Brazilians spend more than double the amount of money on magazines than they do newspapers. And when they look to spend, they show an interest in specialized information on decoration, fashion and food. This has given rise to more niche magazines, like Gloss, a teen magazine with a circulation of 140,000. Other hot niche pubs include luxury magazine Wish Report and yachting magazine Nautica.


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