School of radiologic technology


COLUMBUS TECHNICAL COLLEGE



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COLUMBUS TECHNICAL COLLEGE


School of Health Sciences

RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY COURSE SEQUENCE

Semester System- 6 Semester

As of 01/01/2016




Semester


Course

Description

Contact

Hours

Lec Lab

Credit

Hours

Prerequisites


SEMN 1000

BIOL 2113 w Lab

ENG 1101

AHS 1090

PSYC 1101

First Semester Seminar

Anatomy & Physiology I
Composition & Rhetoric

Medical Terminology

Psychology

Total

1

3 1
3



2

3

12



-

4
3

2

3

12

Prerequisites

BIO 2114 w Lab

MATH1111

HUM 1101

SPCH 1101

Anatomy & Physiology II
College Algebra

Humanities

Speech

Total

3 1
3

3

3

13

4
3

3

3

13

1st Semester
Spring


RADT 1030

RADT 1010

RADT 1320

RADT 1075

Radiographic Procedures I

Introduction to Radiologic Technology

Clinical Radiography I

Radiographic Imaging

Total

2 1

3 1

4

4

15

3

4

4

4

15

2nd Semester
Summer



RADT 1060

RADT 1330

RADT 65

Radiographic Procedures II

Clinical Radiography II

Radiologic Science


Total

2 1

7

2


12

3

7

2


12

3rd Semester

Fall


RADT 2090

RADT 2340

RADT 1085

RADT 1200

Radiographic Procedures III

Clinical Radiography III

Radiographic Equipment

Radiation Biology/Protection
Total

1 1

6

3

2
13

2

6

3

2
13

4th Semester
Spring


RADT 2360

RADT 2260

Clinical Radiography IV

Radiologic Technology Review


Total

9

3


12


9

3


12


Total 77 77

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
RADT 1010- INTRODUCTION TO RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY

Introduces a grouping of fundamental principles, practices, and issues common to many specializations in the health care profession. In addition to the essential skills, students explore various delivery systems and related issues. Provides the student with an overview of radiography and patient care. Students will be oriented to the radiographic profession as a whole. Emphasis will be placed on patient care with consideration of both physical and psychological conditions. Introduces a grouping of fundamental principles, practices, and issues common to many specializations in the health care profession. In addition to the essential skills, students explore various delivery systems and related issues. Provides the student with an overview of radiography and patient care. Students will be oriented to the radiographic profession as a whole. Emphasis will be placed on patient care with consideration of both physical and psychological conditions. Topics include: Topics include: ethics, medical and legal considerations, “Right to Know Law”, professionalism, basic principles of radiation protection, basic principles of exposure, equipment introduction, health care delivery systems, hospital and departmental organization, hospital and technical college affiliation, medical emergencies, pharmacology/contrast agents, media, OR and mobile procedures patient preparation, death and dying, body mechanics/transportation, basic life support/CPR, and patient care in radiologic sciences.


RADT 1030- Radiographic Procedures I

Introduces the knowledge required to perform radiologic procedures applicable to the human anatomy. Emphasis will be placed on the production of quality radiographs, and laboratory experience will demonstrate the application of theoretical principles and concepts. Topics include: introduction to radiographic procedures; positioning terminology; positioning considerations; procedures, anatomy, and topographical anatomy related to body cavities, bony thorax, upper extremities, shoulder girdle; and lower extremities.


RADT 1060- Radiographic Procedures II

Continues to develop the knowledge required to perform radiographic procedures. Topics include: anatomy and routine projections of the pelvic girdle; anatomy and routine projections of the spine, gastrointestinal (GI) procedures; genitourinary (GU) procedures; biliary system procedures; and minor procedures.


RADT 1065- Radiologic Science

Content is designed to establish a basic knowledge of atomic structure and terminology. Also presented are the nature and characteristics of radiation, x-ray production and the fundamentals of photon interactions with matter.


RADT 1075- Radiographic Imaging

Factors that govern the image production process, film imaging with related accessories, and a basis for analyzing radiographic images. Included are the importance of minimum imaging standards, discussion of a problem-solving technique for image evaluation and the factors that can affect image quality. Actual images will be included for analysis. Content is designed to impart an understanding of the components, principles and operation of digital imaging systems found in diagnostic radiology. Factors that impact image acquisition, display, archiving and retrieval are discussed. Guidelines for selecting exposure factors and evaluating images within a digital system assist students to bridge between film-based and digital imaging systems, with a knowledge base in radiographic, fluoroscopic, mobile and tomographic equipment requirements and design.


RADT 1085- Radiographic Equipment

This content also provides a basic knowledge of quality control, principles of digital system quality assurance and maintenance are presented. Content is designed to provide entry-level radiography students with principles related to computed tomography (CT) imaging, and other imaging modalities (i.e., MRI, US, NM, Mammography) in terms of purpose, principles, equipment/material, and procedure. Topics include: imaging equipment, digital image acquisition and display, and basic principles of CT and other imaging modalities. Topics include: imaging equipment, digital image acquisition and display, and basic principles of CT and other imaging modalities.


RADT 1200- PRINCIPLES OF RADIATION BIOLOGY AND PROTECTION

Provides instruction on the principles of cell radiation interaction. Radiation effects on cells and factors affecting cell response are presented. Acute and chronic effects of radiation are discussed. Topics include: radiation detection and measurement; patient protection; personnel protection; absorbed dose equivalencies; agencies and regulations; introduction to radiation biology; cell anatomy, radiation/cell interaction; and effects of radiation.


RADT 2090- Radiographic Procedures III

Continues to develop the knowledge required to perform radiographic procedures. Topics include: anatomy and routine projections of the cranium; anatomy and routine projections of the facial bones; anatomy and routine projections of the sinuses; sectional anatomy of the head, neck, thorax and abdomen. Content is designed to introduce the student to concepts related to disease and etiological considerations. Pathology and disease as they relate to various radiographic procedures are discussed with emphasis on radiographic appearance of disease and impact on exposure factor selection. Topics include: fundamentals of pathology, trauma/physical injury, and systematic classification of disease.




RADT 2260- RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY REVIEW

Provides a review of basic knowledge from previous courses and helps the student prepare for national certification examinations for radiographers. Topics include: image production and evaluation; radiographic procedures; anatomy, physiology, pathology, and terminology; equipment operation and quality control; radiation protection; and patient care and education.


RADT 1320- CLINICAL RADIOGRAPHY I

Introduces students to the hospital clinical setting and provides an opportunity for students to participate in or observe radiographic procedures. Topics include: orientation to hospital areas and procedures; orientation to mobile/surgery; orientation to radiography and fluoroscopy; participation in and/or observation of procedures related to body cavities, the shoulder girdle, and upper extremities. Activities of students are under direct supervision.


RADT 1330- CLINICAL RADIOGRAPHY II

Continues introductory student learning experiences in the hospital setting. Topics include: equipment utilization; exposure techniques; attend to and/or observation of routine projections of the lower extremities, pelvic girdle, and spine; attend to and/or observation of procedures related to the gastrointestinal (GI), genitourinary (GU), and biliary systems; and attend to and/or observation of procedure related to minor radiologic procedures. Execution of radiographic procedures will be conducted under direct and indirect supervision.




RADT 2340- CLINICAL RADIOGRAPHY III

Provides students with continued hospital setting work experience. Students continue to develop proficiency in executing procedures introduced in Radiographic Procedures. Topics include: patient care; behavioral and social competencies; performance and/or observation of minor special procedures, special equipment use, and participation in and/or observation of cranial and facial radiography. Execution of radiographic procedures will be conducted under direct and indirect supervision.



RADT 2360- CLINICAL RADIOGRAPHY V

Provides students with continued hospital setting work experience. Students demonstrate increased proficiency levels in skills introduced in all of the radiographic procedures courses and practiced in previous clinical radiography courses. Topics include: patient care; behavioral and social competency; advanced radiographic anatomy; equipment utilization; exposure techniques; sterile techniques; integration of procedures and/or observation of angiographic, interventional, minor special procedures; integration of procedures and/or observation of special equipment use; integration of procedures and/or observation of routine and special radiographic procedures; and final completion of all required clinical competencies. Execution of radiographic procedures will be conducted under direct and indirect supervision.




TEXTBOOKS

Latest edition of each of the following:




  1. Ballinger, P.; Merrill’s Atlas of Radiographic Positions and Radiologic Procedures




  1. Bushong, Stewart; Radiologic Science for Technologists




  1. Taber’s Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary, FA Davis Company




  1. Eisenberg, R.L. & Dennis C.; Comprehensive Radiographic Pathology




  1. Carlton, R & Adler, A.; Principles of Radiographic Imaging




  1. Statkiewicz, M.; Radiation Protection in Medical Radiography




  1. DeVos, D.; Basic Principles of Radiographic Exposure




  1. Adler, A. & Carlton, R.; Introduction to Radiography and Patient Care




  1. Kath, Kathleen; Pocket Reference to Radiographic Exposure Techniques




  1. Ballinger, P.; Pocket Guide to Radiography




  1. Carter, C & Veale, B.; Digital Radiography and PACS




  1. Fauber, Terri L.; Radiographic Imaging & Exposure



ACADEMIC CLASSROOM POLICIES
The following standards and policies are MANDATORY for ALL classes in this program:


  1. Uniforms must be worn by all students when reporting to class after clinicals. Should a student be attending class but have time off for any reason, they must abide by the following:

    • Shoes must be worn in class

    • No halters or tank tops shall be worn to class

    • No shorts or beachwear shall be worn to class

    • Jeans/slacks/pants are allowed as long as they are not frayed or torn in any way. An appropriate top/shirt should be worn to the college for class.

2. Students must be prompt to class. Tardiness will not be tolerated. See Columbus Technical College Student Handbook.


3. Talking to classmates during class will not be tolerated. Passing notes between students during class must not occur. Students shall have respect for all instructors.
4. All cell phones brought into the classroom must be inaudible or the student will be requested to leave the classroom and will be counted as absent. Any contacts needed for the student in case of emergency during class may be handled through the School of Health Sciences office (706-225-0502). Students may be asked to leave their cell phones on the instructor’s desk during testing.
5. As per CTC regulations, soft drinks and food are not permitted in the classroom or lab. All eating shall be done during break in specified areas. There is a Student Center on the first floor of the Robert Wright Health Sciences Building for your convenience with snack and drink machines available.
6. Feet shall not be propped on desks and no school property shall be defaced. Defacing of school property is grounds for dismissal from the college and the program.
7. Sleeping will not be tolerated in class. Students found sleeping shall be warned on the first offense. On the second offense, the student will be asked to leave class. On the third offense, the student will be requested to meet with the instructor and the Program Director/Dean of Health Sciences. Further action will be taken as necessary.
8. Columbus Technical College is a smoke-free campus and smoking is not permitted in or on school facilities. There is also a No Smoking policy at all affiliate clinical sites and their properties. Students MUST NOT smoke anywhere on these campuses, not even in their cars. Smoking on campus or on clinical site property is grounds for dismissal.
9. Use of profanity is unacceptable and will not be tolerated.
Classes: The program is planned on a definite schedule in order that the student will obtain the proper ratio of clinical and academic experiences. Students are required to maintain a C average in each academic course each semester and a B average is required in clinical courses to be able to advance in the program. Attitude and cooperation will also be taken into consideration and the student will receive a Work Ethics grade in each course and also an employability grade.

TESTS
Tests: Examinations are given throughout each didactic course’s progress. The type of examinations administered is at the discretion of the instructor. At the end of all courses, comprehensive final exams are given. There will not be any make-up exams given for a previously failed exam or missed exam. Any recommendations shall be determined by the Program Advisory Committee. Should a student be absent from an examination, she/he must consult the instructor. Generally, if a test is missed, the score made on the final exam will be used for the score of that test.
Guest Lecturers: Radiologists, Radiologic Technologists and technical representatives of commercial companies will sometimes present lectures or classes. These lectures are part of the formal education and exams may be given on material presented.
ACHIEVEMENT INCENTIVE PROGRAM
PURPOSE: To promote and support excellence in performance and skills as evidenced in the cognitive, psychomotor and affective domains.
Students may qualify for this program during the following semesters of attendance while enrolled in the Radiologic Technology Program:
1. 1st Semester

2. 2nd Semester

3. 3rd Semester

CRITERIA –

1. Maintain perfect attendance for the semester

2. Minimum academic average of 90 for the semester

3. Minimum clinical average of 90 and above average performance

4. No record of disciplinary action, incompletes, lost time cards, or film badges, and NO

absences or tardies.



5. Affective domain evaluations exhibit positive attitude
AWARD –One day (up to 7 hours) off from Clinical Schedule- available to be observed on a weekday and requested, preferably, one week in advance (if not possible, at least 24 hours in advance). These days cannot be used to make up absences.

NOTE: The Program reserves the right to evaluate the Achievement Incentive Program with each semester to determine changes if necessary.

STUDENT ADVISEMENT FOR ACADEMIC COURSE PREPARATION



  1. Recommend students study and challenge the objectives at the beginning of

each chapter in the pertinent textbook(s) for the course or section of study.

  1. Recommend the pre-reading of assigned or suggested reading prior to the lecture(s) be performed by the student.

  2. Student being present for lecture(s) is required and very important for successful achievement.

  3. Students should take adequate notes during the lecture. Maintain all handouts provided by the instructor.

  4. BRING the required textbook(s) to class and utilize as instructed. Sharing a textbook in class with a classmate is distracting and is discouraged.

  5. Students should ask pertinent questions when further interpretation is needed. If questions are not verbalized during the lecture, the instructor should be approached immediately at the conclusion of the lecture. If a question should arise later and an appointment is needed with the instructor, please allow an appropriate amount of time for the instructor to satisfactorily work in to their schedule. REMEMBER – an emergency on your part (or inappropriate planning), does NOT constitute an emergency on the instructor’s part. Instructors do welcome you inquires.

  6. Students should perform the post-reading of the assigned or suggested reading as indicated from the course syllabus or as further advised by the instructor.

  7. Self-preparation to achieve satisfactory course content knowledge is the required responsibility of the student. This may require a combination of activities in order to perform satisfactorily.

  8. The study of lecture material should take place daily and immediately after the lecture. An appropriate amount of time should be allowed in the scheduling plan of the student to address all topics. The appropriateness of scheduling study time should address the quantity and quality of time. Also, the materials needed and quality of the student’s environment should be addressed. Last minute cramming is poor preparation and is NOT recommended.



STUDENT ADVISEMENT FOR COURSE EXAMINATIONS


  1. Instructors will generally advise the type of test and approximate number of questions on the exam, the major and minor topics to be covered, the date and time of the exam, and the frequency of exams for the course of study.

  2. Instructions for examinations will be provided by the instructor. If you have a question after exam begins, please go to the instructor in the classroom and quietly make your inquiries. If the instructor notes changes on the exam that were not previously announced, these may be announced or written on the board.

  3. The majority of examinations in the program are multiple choice type questions with separate answer sheets provided. Instructors may select other types of questions which may consist of matching, written response, fill in the blank, true-false, and critical thinking questions.

  4. Test-taking skills can be improved. Review the exam before starting. Practice improving test anxiety when needed. Answer the questions first that you know. Never leave an answer blank. Review the exam and answer sheet before submitting to the instructor. The CARE center (P-600) is also available on campus for review and enhancement of test-taking skills.

  5. The majority of all radiology program examinations are NOT returned to the student. A student can ask to see a test during regular office hours of the instructor. There are usually no make-up tests/exams. If you miss a weekly test, your score on the final exam will be used as the score for that particular test. Students should make every effort to be in class on test days.



  1. If you have a question about the exam, please see the instructor. If the instructor is unavailable for the day, consult the Program Director.

  2. Examinations may not be reviewed in class. This activity is at the discretion of the instructor and when time is available.

  3. Grading and scoring of the exam: The grading scale is in the academic section of the Student Handbook. An analysis of each exam is usually performed by the instructor. This provides information to the faculty as to the number scoring satisfactorily and unsatisfactorily on each question and the overall exam. The instructor has the responsibility to eliminate questions missed by a majority (80%) of the class. Example: 80% of 15 students = 12 students who missed the question..

  4. Exams may be reviewed by the student upon scheduling an appointment with the instructor. The review of the test could reveal possible error in grading and the revealing of error made by the student to include the answer for questions missed.

CONSULT THE POLICY AND PROCEDURES MANUAL –STUDENT HANDBOOK FOR POLICIES NOT STATED HERE REGARDING ACADEMICS OR CLASSROOM.





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