Lesson Plan motion and position



Download 32.79 Kb.
Date22.04.2018
Size32.79 Kb.

Lesson Plan

MOTION and POSITION




Standard SC.6.L.14.5

Identify and investigate the general functions of the major systems of the human body (digestive, respiratory, circulatory, reproductive, excretory, immune, nervous, and musculoskeletal) and describe ways these systems interact with each other to maintain homeostasis

Learning Objectives

  1. The student will be able to identify and investigate the organs and functions of the skeletal and muscular system.

  2. The student will describe the interactions between the skeletal and muscular systems to maintain homeostasis.

Homeostasis and body systems

Homeostasis: regulation of an organism’s internal and life maintaining conditions.

Motion in your Body is controlled by your brain sending electrical messages to your voluntary muscles through your nervous system. These electrical impulses create a series of expansions and contractions of opposing pairs of muscles. When one muscle contracts, another muscle expands. The result is movement of the skeletal system. Blood carries energy rich molecules to the muscle cells where chemical energy is stored and then released. As the muscle contracts, the chemical energy is then change to mechanical energy (movement) and then to thermal energy (heat.) Maintaining a consistent body temperature is critical to the maintenance of homeostasis in the human body. If the body temperature needs to be lowered heat is released from the body in the form of sweat. If the body is to cold, the muscles shiver to generate body heat. Getting a sufficient amount of daily high quality rest is also critical to homeostasis. When the supply of energy rich molecules is used up, the muscle becomes tired and the body needs to rest. Finally, Blood vessels, contained within the periosteum, carry nutrients to the bone. Calcium and phosphate are components that make compact bones strong. Cells involved in the growth and repair of bones are also found in the periosteum. Growth and repair is also necessary for homeostasis.



Prior Knowledge

Students should know how living things are organized and classified.

Students should know the structure of an animal cell and the functions of the organelles.

Teaching Strategy Teacher will present interactive power point on Muscular and skeletal system.

Guided Practice Student will fill in Cornell Notes individually and with partner support. Upon completion student will complete lab report for Motion and Position Lab.

Laboratory Exercise

Teacher will assign leveled cooperative groups of four students each. Groups should be based on pre assessment data. Teacher will pass out lab task roles and students will wear them around their necks. Teacher will pass out student lab reports.

Students should be given time to read and discuss in the groups the lab activity. After discussing their understanding of the lab with their partners, teacher should ask probing questions in round robin style to confirm student understanding of the task at hand.

Hypothesis

S/W generate a hypothesis in response to the problem question.



Problem Question:

Based on the data can the scientist identify and touch a position on his/her body with their eyes closed?



Guiding Questions: What are the guiding questions for this lesson?
1. How do the skeletal and muscular systems work together to maintain homeostasis? Blood cells are created in the bone marrow inside of the bones of the skeletal system. Blood vessels contained within carry nutrients to the bone. Muscles attach to the bones. Muscles engage in shivering in order to increase body temperature when needed.

  1. What is the general function of the skeletal system? The skeletal system provides structure and framing for our bodies. It protects our organs and gives the body shape.

  2. What is the general function of the muscular system? The muscle provides a place for the bones to attach and aide in movement of the body.

4. Why is homeostasis important to the human body? Homeostasis is a healthy state of balance of all body systems. In order for the body to function and maintain itself and to do work, homeostasis must be maintained.

PROCEDURE

Student Directions:

One student in the group will close his eyes and raise both hands over his head. All other group members will watch and make sure his eyes stay shut. The recorder in the group will fill in the data table as the student successfully or unsuccessfully completes the task.


  1. With both hands raised over his/her head, the left hand should be held completely still without movement or waving.

  2. Student should then use the index finger on his right hand to touch the tip of his/her nose. From the tip of his nose, he should immediately raise his hand up again and immediately touch his/her left thumb.

  3. The index finger returns to touch the nose again and then immediately touches the index finger on the left hand.

  4. The index finger returns to touch the nose and then touches the middle finger on the right hand.

  5. The index finger returns to touch he nose and then touches the ring finger on the left hand.

  6. The index finger returns to touch the nose and then touches the pinky on the left hand.

  7. The same student repeats the whole process again but switches hands from left to right.

  8. Each student should repeat the process following all the above steps.

  9. Students should alternate responsibility of recording data.

Directions: The recorder will put a check when the correct fingers make contact and an X if the fingers touch in the wrong place or do not touch at all.

LEFT HAND




Nose

Left thumb

Left index

Left Middle finger

Left Ring finger

Left Pinky

Latin names

Nases

Pollex

Digitus Segundus Manus

Digitus Me’dius

Digitus Annula’ris

Digitus Mi’nimus Ma’nus

Student #1



















Student #1



















Student #3



















Student #4



















TOTALS



















There actually are no muscles in our fingers. Fingers are moved by tendons, pulled by muscles in the forearm. That's why if you flex your fingers, you can feel the muscles in your forearm. You could say that we don't directly control our fingers at all. The muscles in the forearm and palm are connected to the finger bones by smooth, flexible strings called tendons. The way our finger joints bend is by the muscles pulling on these tendons.

RIGHT HAND






Nose

Right thumb

Right index

Right Middle finger

Right Ring finger

Right Pinky

Latin names

Nases

Pollex

Digitus Segundus Manus

Digitus Me’dius

Digitus Annula’ris

Digitus Mi’nimus Ma’nus

Student #1



















Student #1



















Student #3



















Student #4



















TOTALS




















Conclusions:


  1. Based on the totals in your data table, was each student more successful at one side or the other? Why or why not? Defend your answer.

Generally speaking success in this task seems to be a functions of which hand with which the student writes.




  1. Summarize the following in your own words. Since it is known that we have no muscles in our fingers explain how we are able to move our fingers?

There actually are no muscles in our fingers. Fingers are moved by tendons, pulled by muscles in the forearm. That's why if you flex your fingers, you can feel the muscles in your forearm. You could say that we don't directly control our fingers at all. The muscles in the forearm and palm are connected to the finger bones by smooth, flexible strings called tendons. The way our finger joints bend is by the muscles pulling on these tendons.



  1. Explain in numbered steps how our brain generates movement in our body?

1. Motion in your Body is controlled by your brain sending electrical messages to you voluntary muscles through your nervous system.

2. These electrical impulses create a series of expansions and contractions of opposing pairs of muscles.

3. When one muscle contracts and another muscle expands the result is movement of the skeletal system.




  1. See the chart below. These are the joints in the human body. Identify which kinds of joints are found in your fingers and wrists and describe the motion of the joint.

Hinge joints are found in the fingers. This joint has a smaller range and has a back and forth motion like a door. Gliding joints are found in the wrist. This joint is where one part of the bone slides over another and they also move back and forth.



Pivot: One bone rotates in a ring of another bone that does not move. Turning your head is an example.

Ball and Socket: This a ball with a rounded end that fits in the cavity of another bone. Swinging arms and legs in any direction is an example of this motion.

Hinge: This joint has a smaller range and has a back and forth motion like a door. These joints are found in elbows, knees and fingers.

Gliding: This joint is where one part of the bone slides over another and they also move back and forth. They are found in wrists ankles and in between vertebrae




  1. Beginning with a thought in your brain, explain the process of how you can voluntarily move your body?

Motion in your Body is controlled by your brain sending electrical messages to you voluntary muscles through your nervous system. These electrical impulses create a series of expansions and contractions of opposing pairs of muscles. When one muscle contracts and another muscle expands the result is movement of the skeletal system.


  1. Temperature control is critical to the health of our bodies. Explain the relationship of the muscular and skeletal system and how they contribute to controlling temperature for the purpose of homeostasis.

As the muscle contracts the chemical energy is then change to mechanical energy (movement) and then to thermal energy (heat.) Maintaining a consistent body temperature is critical to the maintenance of homeostasis in the human body. If the body temperature needs to be lowered heat is released from the body in the form of sweat. If the body is to cold, the muscles shiver to generate body heat.


  1. In summary how do calcium and phosphorous contribute to homeostasis.

Calcium and phosphate are components that make compact bones strong.


  1. Describe the processes that occur in the periosteum and how they contribute to homeostasis.

Blood vessels contained within the periosteum carry nutrients to the bone. Calcium and phosphate are components that make compact bones strong. Cells involved in the growth and repair of bones are also found in the periosteum. Growth and repair is also necessary for homeostasis.

Pick only one of the following.



  1. Do you think homeostasis is important to the maintenance of your health? Defend your answer with 3 well written paragraphs.




  1. Design a poster that describes homeostasis. Illustrate with colorful pictures 6 different ways your body maintains a healthy balance at all times.

© copyright 2014 All Rights Reserved CPalms.org





Share with your friends:


The database is protected by copyright ©dentisty.org 2019
send message

    Main page