Identifying Simple Subjects and Simple Predicates



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Identifying Simple Subjects and Simple Predicates


For each sentence underline the simple subject once and the simple predicate twice.


  1. American teenagers spent $88 billion in 1993.

  2. The amount increased to $99 billion in 1994.

  3. Earnings from jobs rose from $84 billion in 1993 to $96 billion in 1994.

  4. Money came from jobs, allowances, and gifts.

  5. In 2012 the amount was $208.7 billion.


Identifying Complete Subjects and Complete Predicates


For each sentence draw a vertical line between the complete subject and the complete predicate.


  1. Canobie Lake Park in the southeastern section of New Hampshire opened in 1902.

  2. Many people consider Canobie Lake Park the most beautiful amusement park in the United States.

  3. The pleasant grounds feature tree-lined walkways, flower gardens, and a lake.

  4. Guests to the park are especially amused by the authentic Mississippi-style paddle-wheel riverboat.

  5. The eighty-acre park is regarded as one of the most popular entertainment centers in New England.

  6. The entire family will find something of enjoyment there.

  7. Everyone loves the antique carousel with its beautiful hand-carved horses.

  8. Young and not-so-young thrill seekers ride the park’s four roller coasters again and again.

  9. Small children squeal in delight at the costumed characters throughout the park.

  10. The park presents high-tech fireworks and musical performances all summer long.


Identifying Subjects and Predicates


For each sentence draw a vertical line between the complete subject and the complete predicate. Then, underline the simple subject once and the simple predicate twice.


  1. Frederick Douglass dedicated his life to the fight for racial equality.

  2. He was born enslaved in Tuckahoe, Maryland, around 1817.

  3. Douglass escaped from his master in 1838.

  4. The brave young man spoke at an antislavery meeting in Massachusetts in 1841.

  5. The enthusiastic reaction to his speech led to a series of lecture engagements.

  6. Douglass staged protests against racial segregation on trains, in churches, and in schools.

  7. His activities included the publication of an antislavery newspaper.

  8. President Abraham Lincoln conferred with Douglass during the Civil War.

  9. The proud African-American served as United States minister to Haiti from 1889 to 1891.

  10. The African-American community owes a great deal to Douglass and his tireless struggle for civil rights.


Identifying Compound Subjects


For each sentence underline the simple compound subject once.


  1. Two peach baskets and a gym set the stage for the world’s first basketball game in 1891.

  2. Two teams and an old soccer ball put the play into motion.

  3. Three forwards, three centers, and three guards made up a team.

  4. In 1893 Geneva College and the University of Iowa were the first colleges to play basketball.

  5. Yale University and Wesleyan University met in New Haven in 1896 for the first intercollegiate match.


Identifying Compound Predicates


For each sentence underline the simple compound predicate twice.


  1. Cats are faithful pets and make friendly companions.

  2. Cats seem independent and sometimes resist training.

  3. They generally are fed canned food but may prefer fish or meat.

  4. Cats have good memories and often imitate human activity.

  5. Cats open doors, ring doorbells, and drink from water faucets.

  6. Their pride, however, keeps them from foolish behavior and sometimes makes them stubborn.

  7. An arched back with puffed-out fur is caused by fear or initiated by anger.

  8. These physical changes make the cat’s appearance larger, give the impression of ferocity, and intimidate enemies and prey.

  9. Cats usually approach their prey very stealthily and then pounce.

  10. The tabby is easy-going, does not stray far, and appears very affectionate and even tempered.



Identifying Subjects and Predicates


For each sentence underline the simple subject once and the simple predicate twice. Watch for compounds!


  1. Several North American cultures built large mounds of earth thousands of years ago and used them as burial places for their chiefs.

  2. The Adena, the Hopewell, and the Mississippians were the three major groups of mound builders.

  3. Much time and much effort were devoted to the construction of each mound.

  4. Large quantities of dirt and stone were the primary construction materials of the mound builders.

  5. Each mound builder carried loads of dirt on his back and transported them to the burial sites.

  6. No horses, oxen, or carts assisted the workers in their difficult task.

  7. Jewelry or pipes for the deceased chief were often buried in the mounds.

  8. Many large mounds still stand in the Midwestern United States and Canada.

  9. The Giant Serpent Mound near Hillsboro, Ohio, looks like a huge, sinuous snake and is approximately a quarter of a mile long.

  10. Monk’s Mound near Cahokia in southern Illinois covers about sixteen acres and is about one hundred feet high.


Identifying Subjects and Predicates in Commands and Questions


For each sentence underline the simple subject once and the simple predicate twice. If the sentence is a command, write (You) as the subject.


  1. Can anyone name three main types of musical instruments?

  2. Notice the string instruments, the wind instruments, and the percussion instruments.

  3. Give me an example of a string instrument.

  4. In what ways are a drum and a xylophone similar?

  5. Do you see the sheet music on the stand?



Analyzing Subjects and Predicates


For each sentence complete the following:

1. Draw a vertical line between the complete subject and the complete predicate.

2. Underline the simple subject once and the simple predicate twice.

3. Write (You) for an understood subject.

4. Indicate sentences that are either a command (C) or written in inverted order (I).

Not all sentences will be labeled C or I.



  1. Some residents of Mexican villages still wear traditional types of clothing.

  2. Many of these styles of clothing date back many centuries.

  3. Look at the young boy in the cornfield.

  4. On his head is a wide-brimmed straw hat.

  5. There are several other types of protective clothing for men and women.

  6. There are some special costumes for holidays and other occasions.

  7. Look at the handsome suits worn by the cowboys, or charros, from Guadalajara.

  8. Here is an example of a traditional Mexican outfit.

  9. The material for the suit of a charro may be doeskin or velvet.

  10. A white shirt, boots with spurs, and a large sombrero complete the costume.



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