Workshop report Environmental data management in Tanzania 21-23. October 2014



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Workshop report

Environmental data management
in Tanzania


21-23. October 2014

Giraffe Ocean View Hotel

Dar es Salaam

Ragnvald Larsen





Report version:

Version 1.0, 9th of December 2014



Author contact information:

Chief Engineer: Ragnvald Larsen

Email: rla@miljodir.no

Cell: 004792421540

Web: http://www.miljodirektoratet.no/english/

Table of contents


Executive summary 4

Introduction 6

Workshop review 7

Program 7

Outputs 8

Evaluation of the workshop 9

The necessities of coordinating environmental information 11

Data sharing in Tanzania 13

Environmental Information Network explained 16

Designing a MoU for EIN in Tanzania 19

Date and partners 21

Recitals 22

Scope 23

Commencement and duration 23

Responsibilities of the parties 24

Miscellaneous 25

Signatures 26

Definitions and references 26

The process ahead - timeline 27

Concluding remarks 28

Appendix A: Proposed EIN stakeholders 29

Appendix B: Participants 31

Appendix C: Workshop program 34

Tuesday 21stof October 34

Wednesday 22ndof October 35

Thursday 23rdof October 36

Appendix D: Evaluation form and responses 38

Appendix E: MoU draft per October 2014 41

References 48



Executive summary


The purpose of the workshop was to raise awareness on environmental data management and discuss a way forward towards national level coordination of environmental data and data management.

The workshop participants all represented important owners and managers of environmental data in Tanzania. The dialogue and presentations at the workshop pointed to the importance of establishing standards and procedures for sharing environmental information in Tanzania. Currently the lack of afore mentioned has negative implications on the following:



  • coordinated efforts towards cross sector inventories of environmental assets;

  • environmental impact assessments of various sizes;

  • the establishment and continuous maintenance of emergency response systems;

  • and other efforts related to collection, storing and dissemination of environmental information.


The workshop advice was that the establishment of an Environmental Information Network (EIN) headed by NEMC and supported by the stakeholders represents a rational way forward. A Memorandum of Understanding for an EIN was discussed. NEMC has a position to take the lead in bringing this process forward.

The report sums up the workshop. The author, Ragnvald Larsen, also gives advice for the process towards an environmental information network in Tanzania for the purpose of promoting a knowledge based management of the environment.

The workshop and associated processes are funded by the Norwegian government through the Oil for Development Program coordinated by NORAD – the Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation.

Introduction


The 21st to the 23rd of October 2014 a workshop on data sharing was held at the Giraffe Ocean View Hotel in Dar es Salaam. It was organized NEMC Tanzania in collaboration with the Norwegian Environment Agency. A representative from the Environmental Protection Agency in Ghana also contributed to the workshop.

The purpose of the workshop was to raise awareness on environmental data management and discuss a way forward towards national level coordination of environmental data and data management.

The role of the Norwegian Environment Agency in this workshop was to contribute to this process through the facilitation of discussions, presentations and dialogue with the participants. The participants were representatives from owners and users of environmental data in Tanzania. The Norwegian Oil for Development project funded the workshop.

This report is been written by Ragnvald Larsen to make information about the process available for the workshop participants, prospective stakeholders, researchers and for our own future reference on the process. It represents the views of the author. References to participant points of view will also be included.



In the following chapters, the report will give an overview of the following chapters:

  • The necessities of coordinating environmental information (page 11) explaining why this is important and why it is funded by the Oil for Development program.

  • Data sharing in Tanzania (page 13) is a short recap of the status for data sharing in Tanzania. It points to the work on establishing a National Spatial Data Infrastructure and how the workshop and follow up by NEMC can be part of this bigger picture.

  • Environmental Information Network explained (page 16) by showing how this is a pan-African initiative where UNEP has been tasked with facilitating and supporting the initiative.

  • Designing a MoU for EIN in Tanzania (page 19) is a chapter with feedback from the participants as well as comments from the author of this report. The description is based on a MoU developed in Ghana.

Workshop review


This chapter gives an overview of the workshop, the outcomes and a short peek at the evaluation of the workshop.

Program


The program was for two and a half days. This is a general overview of the program per day:

  1. Reference implementations of environmental data management systems in Norway presented. The history of the process to develop a Spatial Data Infrastructure in Tanzania reviewed. Following an overview of an Environmental Information Network, (see Environmental Information Network explained on page 16). The participants presented their own views and understanding of (environmental) data management in Tanzania. The consensus at the end of the first day was that collection, storage and dissemination of environmental data in Tanzania is an area with many challenges.

  2. On day two we discussed if and how the initiative to national Environmental Information Networks (EIN) by the African Ministerial Committee for the Environment (UNEP, 2013) could be a solution to the challenges described on day one. Examples from Uganda and Ghana presented by Roger Lewis Leh (EPA, Ghana). Samaki consultants1 told about their work with a coastal Sensitivity atlas (IPIECA, 2012) in Tanzania (Samaki consultants, 2011). The day concluded with group work on a Memorandum of Understanding for a Tanzanian EIN.

  3. The last day, Thursday, we discussed MoU the further and a way forward under the leadership of NEMC was suggested by the participants. An outline of a clearinghouse for internally or externally distributed information under a MoU for the Environmental Information Network presented.

The full program is available in Appendix C: Workshop program on page 34.



Dr. Makota discusses the progress of the workshop.

Outputs


Rather than going into detail on the discussions at the workshop I will list some of the more important discussions at the workshop:

  • The status of environmental data management was discussed in depth. The conclusion was that current practices for collection, standardisation, storage and dissemination does not promote good decision processes.

  • Samaki consultants represented by Mohammed Nur Mohammed gave an account of the complexity of designing the Tanzania Coastal Sensitivity Atlas (Samaki consultants, 2011).

  • An Environmental Information Network (EIN) should be established under the leadership of NEMC.

  • Stakeholders for an EIN was a theme which god much focus. Who are the relevant stakeholders for an environmental information network? Should non-governmental institutions should be potential partners to an EIN. One of the participants suggested that all data owner should have an option to be partners. Other again were solidly suggesting that it should be necessary.

An account of discussions and presentations at the workshop is found in the following chapters:

  • The necessities of coordinating environmental information on (page 11)

  • Data sharing in Tanzania (page 13)

  • Environmental Information Network explained (page 16)

  • Designing a MoU for EIN in Tanzania (page 19)



Mohammed Nur Mohammed from Samaki consultants presents. Mathew Richmond also with Samaki consultants comments.

Evaluation of the workshop


The author considers this workshop a good start for the process towards better management of environmental information.

Most of the invited institutions were present. It is still considered that broader list of stakeholders would be a preference. This will have to be considered for future processes.

The environment regulations in Tanzania places a big responsibility on the shoulders of NEMC. Coordinating the work ahead is a big task. The Norwegian Environment Agency will, as part of the Oil for Development Program contribute with advice and facilitation where required.

We distributed am evaluation format the workshop. The feedbacks were generally good. Main findings were:



  • Good stakeholder participation, but missing relevant stakeholders was noted

  • Workshop was considered relevant

  • Facilitation and presentations were considered good


The funding partner will take note of the above feedback. The full evaluation feedback is available in Appendix D: Evaluation form and responses on page 38.



Presentations in progress. The audience is listening.



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