Weatherization Manual Policies and Procedures Supporting Documents for United States Department of Energy (doe) United States Department of Health and Human Services (hhs) Bonneville Power Administration



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  • CHAPTER 5 PROVIDING WEATHERIZATION SERVICES


  • Section 5.5 Heating and Cooling

  • Policy 5.5.1 Air Conditioning and Heating Systems

  • Policy 5.5.2 Combustion Heating Systems

  • Policy 5.5.3 Electric Heating Systems

  • Policy 5.5.4 Solid Fuel Burning Appliance Systems

  • Policy 5.5.5 Space Heaters

  • Policy 5.5.6 Ductless Heat Pumps (DHP)

  • Policy 5.5.7 Fuel Switching

  • Policy 5.5.8 Thermostats

  • Policy 5.5.9 Renewable Energy Systems

  • Effective Date: July 2016 Page 1 of 3

  • Weatherization Policy

  • See also:

  • 10 CFR 440.21(b)(c)

  • 10 CFR 440 Appendix A

  • Replaces: Policy 5.5.1 (PM 16-01 – February 8, 2016) WAP Health & Safety Plan

  • Policy 5.5.1 AIR CONDITIONING AND HEATING SYSTEMS

    1. Ensuring Adequate Heating Systems: Local agencies must ensure that upon completion of weatherization services all dwelling units have a safe, operable, permanently installed, and adequate heating system.

    2. Repairing Systems: Local agencies may repair air conditioning and heating systems.

    3. Replacing Systems or Installing New: Local agencies may replace or install home air conditioning or heating systems if at least one of the following conditions is met:

      1. Existing system is beyond repair.

      2. Existing system can be repaired but only at greater cost than replacement.

      3. Absence of an air conditioning system in the home of an at risk occupant where climate conditions warrant.

      4. Absence of a permanent adequate heating system.

      5. When an evaluation of cost-effectiveness determines the Savings to Investment Ratio (SIR) is 1.0 or greater.

      6. Health and safety.

    4. Inspecting and Testing of Heating Systems:

      1. Primary Systems: Local agencies must inspect and test the system(s) in each dwelling unit for safe operation prior to delivering weatherization services. The Local Agency must document in the client file the condition of heating system prior to weatherization.

    1. Wx Policy 5.5.1 Air Conditioning and Heating Systems Page 2 of 3

      1. Secondary Systems: Local agencies must inspect secondary systems for safety, and document in the client file any hazards identified. Local agencies must notify the client in writing, including recommendations for future use or non-use. Maintenance, modification, or replacement of secondary systems is ordinarily the responsibility of the building owner. Removing, disconnecting, or correcting the secondary system hazards is only allowable if necessary for health and safety or if the SIR is 1 or greater.

    1. Sizing Systems:

      1. Local agencies or their subcontractors must perform either Manual J or deemed equivalent (with Commerce prior written approval) heat load calculations. TREAT is deemed equivalent to Manual J. Local agencies must document sizing calculations in the client file.

      2. To properly size equipment and install new systems, local agencies or subcontractors must use the completed post-weatherization project in the sizing calculations.

      3. When sizing a new forced air furnace, local agencies or subcontractors must not exceed 140% of the heat load calculations.

    1. Exception: Natural gas- or oil-fired space heating equipment whose total rated space heating output in any one dwelling unit is 40,000 Btu/h or less is exempt from the sizing limit.

    1. Replacing Systems in Rental Units, other than low-income owned, also requires the following:

      1. Local agencies must inform the owner of their legal responsibilities and liabilities under RCW 59.18.060.

      2. Local agencies must work with the owner to make a contribution of at least 50 percent, since a new system is a capital improvement to the property.

        1. Owner may make either a cash or in-kind contribution. Contributions other than cash must benefit the client directly or the weatherization program.

        2. If owners refuse to participate, local agency options include the following:

          1. Defer project.

          2. Alternative financing.

    1. Wx Policy 5.5.1 Air Conditioning and Heating Systems Page 3 of 3

          1. Negotiate extended rent freeze beyond normal property owner/agency agreement.

          2. File a covenant in lieu of the normal property owner/agency agreement assuring continued occupancy by low-income tenants for at least five years.

          3. Negotiate a combination of the above to allow weatherization funds to cover more than 50 percent of the cost of the system replacement.

    1. Requiring Permits: Local agencies or their subcontractors must obtain required permits prior to the replacement of a system.

    2. Switching Fuels: The general practice of fuel switching when replacing heating systems is not permitted. See Section 5.5.7, Fuel Switching, for acceptable conditions.

    3. Educating Clients: Local agencies will educate clients about the importance of regular maintenance.

    1. Clients with forced-air systems will be educated on the importance of replacing or cleaning air filters monthly during the heating or cooling season.



    2. Effective Date: July 2017 Page 1 of 2

    3. Weatherization Policy

    4. See also:

    5. Policy 9.4, Combustion Safety Testing

    6. 10 CFR 440.21(b)(c)

    7. 10 CFR 440 Appendix A

    8. WAP Health & Safety Plan

    9. Replaces: Policy 5.5.2 – July 2016 Variance #17-SWS 5.3003.3a, c-g

    10. Policy 5.5.2 Combustion Heating Systems

    1. Testing for Safety: The Local Agency must test all combustion systems for safety pre- and post-weatherization work. Also see Policy 9.4, Combustion Safety Testing.

    2. Testing for Heat Rise: The Local Agency must test all forced air heating systems for heat rise. If the heat rise is outside the manufacturer’s acceptable range the system fails. If the heating unit fails the heat rise test, The Local Agency must have the appropriate repairs made or defer the project until the problem is corrected.

    1. Exception: If manufacturer’s acceptable heat rise range is unavailable, the default acceptable heat rise range is greater than 40° and less than 70° Fahrenheit.

    2. Variance #17: DOE granted a variance from SWS Section 5.3003.3 Evaluating Air Flow allowing: WA Standard which requires a client interview, confirmation of flow at each register, measurement of heat rise, pressure pan, and room pressures. Unless duct systems are missing or destroyed and require repair or replace, WA will air seal but not resize ducts.

    1. Servicing Gas and Oil Heating Systems: Gas and Oil fired heating systems must be serviced to:

    1. Correct hazards identified during combustion safety inspection and testing.

    2. Improve combustion or distribution efficiency.

    3. Provide the minimum service for a gas or oil heating system where no hazards have been identified:

      1. Clean air handler of furnace or unit heater.

      2. Check and change furnace filter if necessary.

    1. Wx Policy 5.5.2 Combustion Heating Systems Page 2 of 2

    1. Replacing for Efficiency: Replacement of a gas or oil fired heating system is allowable to improve efficiency when justified using a Savings to Investment Ratio (SIR) greater than 1.0 as calculated by the computerized audit tool TREAT. Local agencies must:

    1. Determine the existing heating system efficiency for use in the existing conditions pre-Weatherization TREAT model, by testing the steady state efficiency with a combustion analyzer, from the manufacturer’s information use the Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency (AFUE) rating, or by the type and age of the unit.

    2. Determine the replacement cost using Commerce established procurement guidelines.

    3. Generate the SIR in the improvement package post-Weatherization TREAT model for replacement furnace with 90% AFUE.

    1. Exception: If the improvement package with a 90% furnace cannot achieve a SIR>1, then an improvement package with a 80% furnace and a SIR>1 is allowable. Document justification in client file.

    1. Maximizing Efficiency of New Replacement Systems: All new oil or gas heating systems installed must have a minimum AFUE rating of 90% unless:

      1. A 90% efficient unit is cost prohibitive (cannot be cost justified by an SIR of 1.0 or greater). Any replacement furnace must be at least 80% efficient and cost justified by an SIR of 1.0 or greater

      2. Leveraged funds may be used to reduce weatherization fund source investments in order to bring the SIR to 1.0 or greater.



    1. Effective Date: July 2016 Page 1 of 1

    2. Weatherization Policy

    3. See also:

    4. Replaces: Policy 5.5.3 –July 2015 Variance #17-SWS 5.3003.3a, c-g

    5. POLICY 5.5.3 ELECTRIC HEATING SYSTEMS

    1. Inspection of electric heating systems: The minimum requirement for electrically heated dwelling units is:

      1. Visual inspection of the electrical system.

      2. Visual inspection of heating system clearances to combustibles.

      3. Visual inspection of air handler (if present).

      4. Verification that the system is permanently installed and securely attached to the floor, wall, or ceiling.

    1. Heat Rise: The Local Agency shall test all forced air heating systems for heat rise. If the heat rise is outside the manufacturer’s acceptable range the system fails. If the heating unit fails the heat rise test, The Local Agency shall have the appropriate repairs made or defer the project until the problem is corrected.

    1. Exception: If manufacturer’s acceptable heat rise range is unavailable, the default acceptable heat rise range is greater than 40° and less than 70° Fahrenheit.

    2. Variance #17: DOE granted a variance from SWS Section 5.3003.3 Evaluating Air Flow allowing: WA Standard which requires a client interview, confirmation of flow at each register, measurement of heat rise, pressure pan, and room pressures. Unless duct systems are missing or destroyed and require repair or replace, WA will air seal but not resize ducts.

    1. Electric heating system service: Electric heating systems shall be serviced to:

    1. Correct hazards identified during initial inspection.

    2. Complete system checks and repairs detailed in the work order form.

    3. Improve distribution efficiency.

    4. Provide the minimum service where no hazards are identified

    1. Fan blades and cabinet of the air handler cleaned free of all visible dirt.

    2. Check and change furnace filter if necessary.


    1. Policy 5.5.4 SOLID FUEL BURNING APPLIANCE SYSTEMS

    2. A. Policy


    1. Local agencies may repair and replace solid fuel burning appliance systems. Maintenance, repair, and replacement of primary indoor heating units is allowed where occupant health and safety is a concern. Maintenance and repair of secondary heating units is allowed. For more information on secondary systems, See Section 5.5.1, Air Conditioning and Heating Systems.

      1. A supplemental audit for solid fuel burning appliance systems must be completed prior to repair or replacement. See Exhibit 5.1.3A, Solid Fuel Burning Appliance Systems Supplemental Audit Form.

      2. Replacement is allowed if an evaluation (supplemental audit) performed by either the local agency or a heating system subcontractor determines either of the following, even when another heating system is in the home:

        1. The life expectancy of a unit or system is less than one year.

        2. It is more cost-effective to replace the unit or system than it is to perform necessary repairs.

    2. If a local agency chooses to include repair and replacement of solid fuel burning appliance systems in its weatherization program, the following must be in place:

      1. Necessary permits must be obtained prior to heating system replacement.

      2. All applicable restrictions and code regulations must be met.

      3. Local agencies must have appropriate liability insurance.

      4. Local agencies must have a trained technician perform all installations, maintenance, and inspection. All work must receive approval from subsequent inspections.

    3. Wood and pellet stoves: The Local Agency shall have a trained technician perform a safety inspection on all operable solid fuel burning stoves. Repair technician shall list recommended corrections, and corrections made, for safe operation. This information shall be provided to the occupant and a copy kept in the client file.

      1. Information on clean burning practices

    1. The Local Agency shall provide all clients with solid fuel burning information pamphlet on clean and efficient burning techniques.

      1. Fire Extinguishers

    1. Providing fire extinguishers is an allowed health and safety cost only when a solid fuel burning appliance is present. When a fire extinguisher is provided, the manufacturer's instructions including the owner‘s manual, warranty, and the expected lifetime of the unit information shall be left with the occupant of the dwelling unit.

    1. Local agencies must provide consumer conservation education on safe operation, proper maintenance, and clean & efficient burning techniques.

    2. Required Standards

      1. Solid Fuel Burning Devices Standards (Chapter 173-433 WAC)

      2. Certification and labeling by the National Fire Protection Association under NFPA 211, Standard for Chimneys, Fireplaces, Vents, and Solid Fuel-Burning Appliances. The local fire marshal or building inspector will have the most current information on the standard.

      3. Certification by the Underwriters Laboratory for systems with electrical parts.

      4. Environmental Protection Agency emission standards or local standards if they are stricter.

      5. The following also apply for mobile homes:

        1. Systems that are certified and labeled for mobile homes.



        1. Permits from the state Department of Labor and Industries.

    1. Additional Requirements for Solid Fuel Burning Appliance Systems

    1. Solid fuel burning appliance systems shall be provided with combustion air ducted directly to the appliance. Combustion air shall be provided as recommended by the manufacturer’s specifications.

    2. Exceptions:

    3. Combustion air may be supplied to the room in which the solid fuel appliance system is located in lieu of direct ducting, in an existing home, provided that:

      1. The appliance system is not designed for directly connected outside air or;

      2. The existing construction prohibits the introduction of outside combustion air directly to the appliance system.

      3. The combustion air source shall be located as close to the solid fuel burning appliance system as possible, shall be provided with a back draft damper, and shall be no less than six inches in diameter.

    1. Allowable Costs

    2. Repair and replacement of solid fuel burning appliance systems are allowable costs under DOE, HHS, and MM funds. These measures fall within the total health and safety measures and repairs limits (See Chapter 9, Health & Safety.). These measures do not need to be included in the SIR calculation for all fund sources or in the DOE per home expenditure average. See Chapter 6, Allowable Costs, for allowable expenditures. Providing fire extinguishers is an allowed health and safety cost only when a solid fuel burning appliance is present.


    3. B. Procedure


    1. Programmatic

      1. Client files must include the following documentation:

        1. Supplemental audit (Exhibit 5.1.3A, Solid Fuel Burning Appliance Systems Supplemental Audit Form.)

        2. Clear record of who analyzed or worked on the heating system, when, and work performed.

        3. Inspection approval.

        4. Paid invoices for all work contracted out or performed by an outside heating technician.

        5. All necessary measure-specific justification.

        6. Delivery of consumer conservation education.

      2. Local agency files must include the following documentation:

        1. Necessary permits.

        2. Liability insurance.

      3. See Chapter 6, Allowable Costs.

      4. See Chapter 9, Health & Safety.

    2. Required Installation Standards and Materials Specifications

    1. See Field Guide, Retrofitting Washington


    2. Policy 5.5.5 SPACE HEATERS

    3. A. Policy


    1. Local agencies may repair and replace space heaters under one of the following conditions:

      1. Energy efficiency if the total cost is justified using an evaluation of cost-effectiveness where the Savings to Investment Ratio (SIR) is 1.0 or greater.

      2. Client health and safety.

    2. Local agencies must follow these general requirements for repair and replacement:

      1. Incidental repairs

    1. Make incidental repairs to space heaters as necessary to address health and safety issues.

      1. Provisions for working smoke detectors

    1. Inspect to ensure that a working smoke detector is installed on the same floor as the space heater. The cost of smoke detectors may be charged to Health and Safety Costs.

      1. Other safety hazards

    1. Check to ensure that no obvious building code violations or other safety hazards related to the space heater are evident, for example electric wiring and heater vent pipe.

      1. Permits and inspections

    1. Secure building permits where required and have qualified inspections made before any heater is put into operation. The cost of permits may be charged to Program Costs.

      1. Consumer conservation education

    1. Provide consumer conservation education on safety hazards and the proper operation of equipment, including the operation, testing, and battery replacement of smoke detectors.

    1. Local agencies must follow the specific requirements listed below for space heater and fuel types.

      1. Space heater type

        1. Stand Alone Electric

          1. Stand Alone Electric space heaters are generally portable and do not include the following:

            1. Baseboard units

            2. Zoned heating system components

            3. Other permanently installed electric heating units

          2. Repair, replacement, or installation is not allowed. Removal is recommended. Inform client of hazards and collect a signed waiver if client refuses removal.

          3. Check circuitry to ensure adequate power supply for existing space heaters.

        2. Unvented combustion space heaters

          1. Not allowed as primary heat source.

          2. Removal is required, except as secondary heat where the unit conforms to ANSI Z21.11.2. Units that do not meet ANSI Z21.11.2 must be removed prior to weatherization but may remain until a replacement heating system is in place.

          3. Inform client of dangers of unvented space heaters. CO, moisture, and NO2, can be dangerous even if CO alarm does not sound.

        3. Vented combustion space heaters

          1. Should be treated as furnaces. See Section 5.5.1, Air Conditioning and Heating Systems

          2. Oil-fired space heaters (always vented), vented kerosene space heaters, and vented gas space heaters should be treated as if they are furnaces.

    1. Local agencies may perform tune-ups and clean heater units, vents, and ducts.

          1. See the following information on fuel types for the repair and replacement of vented gas and kerosene space heaters.

      1. Fuel type

        1. Gas

          1. Unvented gas space heaters are prohibited.

          2. Repair of vented gas heaters is allowed, provided that the following concerns are addressed and documented in the client file:

            1. Cost benefits of repair vs. replacement.

            2. Methods to deal with health and safety concerns for the occupants.

            3. Identification of, and compliance with, applicable codes.

            4. Consumer conservation education on the proper use and maintenance of the equipment.

          3. Replacement of a gas space heater is only allowed when the existing unit is in poor mechanical condition or poses health and safety risks for other reasons.

            1. Gas space heaters may not be installed in bedrooms or bathrooms or comparable areas of shelters and group homes.

            2. Replacement should be with another gas heater.

        2. Kerosene

          1. Unvented kerosene space heaters are prohibited.

          2. Repair of vented kerosene space heaters is allowed, provided that the following concerns are addressed and documented in the client file:

            1. Cost benefits of repair vs. replacement.

            2. Methods to deal with health and safety concerns for the occupants.

            3. Identification of, and compliance with, applicable codes.

            4. Consumer conservation education on the proper use and maintenance of the equipment.

          3. Repairs to existing vented kerosene heaters may be considered when they are the only source of heat and no reasonable alternative exists.

    1. Allowable Costs

    2. Repair and replacement of space heaters are allowable costs under DOE, HHS, BPA, and MM funds. Unless health and safety related, repair and replacement must be included in the SIR calculation for all fund sources and in the DOE per home expenditure average. See Chapter 6, Allowable Costs, for allowable expenditures.

    3. Specific fund source limitations or allowances are as follows:

    4. BPA: Units must be electrically heated in BPA service territory.
    5. B. Procedure


    1. Programmatic

      1. Client files must include the following documentation:

        1. Verification the measure has an SIR of 1.0 or greater if it is based on energy efficiency.

        2. Justification if health and safety-related.

        3. All necessary measure-specific justification.

        4. Smoke detector installation as applicable.

        5. Copies of mechanical permits where required and results of inspections.

        6. Delivery of consumer conservation education.

      2. See Chapter 6, Allowable Costs.

      3. See Chapter 9, Health and Safety.

    2. Required Installation Standards & Materials Specifications

    1. Not applicable.

    1. Best Practices

    1. Not applicable.



    2. POLICY 5.5.6 DUCTLESS HEAT PUMPS (DHP)

    3. A. Policy

    1. New DHP Equipment Requirements

      1. Materials – Equipment shall be a split system Ductless Heat Pump (DHP) with an inverter-driven, variable speed compressor, a variable speed outdoor fan, and a multi-speed or variable speed indoor blower unit. Equipment shall be manufactured by a company listed in the Air Conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) Unitary Directory. The Weatherization Program promotes sustainability. The Local Agencies (LA) performing this work are encouraged to utilize “green” materials and products wherever possible and make every effort to recycle waste material.

    1. Ratings – Heat pump equipment shall meet the performance, safety, and rating requirements as given in the latest revision of AHRI Standard 240. Units shall be listed by Underwriters’ Laboratories or equivalent and shall display the AHRI symbol of certification. The DHP equipment shall be listed by model number on the most current Bonneville Power Administration’s Qualified Products List. Last accessed from https://www.bpa.gov/EE/Sectors/Residential/Pages/Ductless-Heat-Pumps.aspx. The heat pump equipment shall be rated with a Heating Seasonal Performance Factor (HSPF) of 10.0 or greater if utilizing a single head or a HSPF of 9.0 or greater if utilizing multiple heads.

    2. Heat Pump Sizing – The heat pump system shall be sized in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications and applicable codes to ensure adequate heat. If the system provides adequate heat at the winter design temperature, a separate back-up system (supplemental heat) is not required. Otherwise, the system shall be designed to include zonal electric resistance heat (either in unit or as separate zone heaters) up to the total capacity required by the house. Sizing of the DHP shall take into consideration the planned thermal improvements to the building through the weatherization program.

    3. Warranty – Heat pump equipment shall be warranted by the manufacturer against defects in material and workmanship for a minimum of two years from the date of start-up of the equipment. In addition, the compressor shall be warranted by the manufacturer against defects in material and workmanship for a minimum of five years from the date of start-up. This warranty should not be considered to cover equipment failure caused by failure to perform normal maintenance, abuse or external causes beyond the control of the LA. A Statement of Warranty must accompany your invoice and must be provided to the building owner.

    1. Local Agency Requirements

    1. Training – The LA shall be responsible for the technical competence and qualifications of his or her salespeople, installers, and service technicians. Technicians must attend the Northwest Ductless Program orientation and be listed on the Northwest Ductless website: https://goingductless.com/partners. At least one technician working on the job site must have received certified installation training from the manufacturer of the installed DHP equipment and be certified as a Type II technician as required by 40 CFR Part 82, Subpart F.

    2. Electrical - All electrical connections and repairs are to be performed by individuals who, working for a licensed electrical contractor, have received appropriate electrician certifications from the Washington State Department of Labor and Industries (L&I). Electrical repairs are to be conducted under the supervision of an electrical administrator. L&I provides both electrician and administrator certifications for various levels of electrical work. The LA is responsible for obtaining required certifications and licensing for self-performance of electrical repairs or for subcontracting electrical repairs to a properly licensed electrical contractor.

    3. Owner Instruction – The LA shall instruct the building owner in proper operation and maintenance of the DHP system. The LA shall provide the building owner with the manufacturer’s owner’s manual, demonstrate filter replacement/cleaning and demonstrate the operation of indoor thermostat controls and indicator lights. The LA shall explain to the building owner the different operating modes of the heat pump system (e.g. heating, cooling, defrost). All this information shall be provided in the owner’s manual given to the building owner. The LA shall instruct the building owner how to operate the DHP in coordination with the existing zonal systems in the home. Instructions shall include adjusting other zonal thermostats so the DHP is the primary heating system.

    4. Safe Work Practices – This work will usually not disturb lead based paint nor asbestos. All work that may disturb lead based paint must be performed in accordance with federal and state regulations, including the use of Lead Safe Weatherization practices (LSW) and in compliance with the EPA’s Renovation, Repair, and Painting Rule (RRP). The LA must document crew certification for compliance with LSW and RRP. In addition, the LA must keep abreast of changes in federal or state requirements regarding lead based paint and comply accordingly. Failure to utilize LSW/RRP, where required, may lead to immediate work stoppage, clearance testing, relocation of occupants, clean-up and/or legal claims. The LA is responsible for costs of activities that arise from a failure to follow the lead safe protocol.

    1. New Equipment Installation

    1. Pursue compliance with federal, state, and local building and environmental codes for the installation of this product. Follow manufacturer’s installation instructions and specifications. The following specifications are not intended to replace manufacturer’s specifications.

    1. Permits – The LA shall be responsible for all permits required by State and local ordinances for the installation of the heat pump system. The LA shall provide the building owner and the Local Agency with copies of all permits related to the work.

    2. Access – Equipment shall be located to allow easy service access and adequate working space for servicing any component without removal of piping or other permanently installed fixtures. Components that require frequent attention, such as filters, shall be located in easily accessible areas. Installations located in attics or crawlspaces are not allowed.

    3. Location of Indoor Unit – Indoor unit shall be located in the main living area, located for best air circulation. Unit shall be installed level and located high on the wall.

    4. Location and Support of Outdoor Units – Outdoor units shall be located to avoid restrictions in the outdoor airstream. Defrost melt shall not drain onto areas where ice formation may create a hazard (walkways etc.). Outdoor units must be installed level. Outdoor units will be installed with either of the following methods:

    1. Units may be anchored to risers which are secured with an adhesive and mechanical connection to an adequate, solid pad which provides proper drainage and prevents a buildup of water, snow or ice. A minimum clearance shall be provided as per manufacturer’s instructions and recommendations. In any installation there shall a minimum of 3” of free and clear area under the outdoor coil drainage area.

    2. Units may be mounted on the building exterior wall, secured and supported according to the manufacturer’s instructions following noise and vibration abatement requirements.

    1. Refrigerant Tubing – Factory tubing flares and fittings are NOT to be reused. Create new flares using appropriate R410a flaring tool and measurement gauge. Apply refrigerant oil to the end of each flare. Connect tubing with R410a nuts (supplied with indoor and outdoor units) using a torque wrench tightened to manufacturer’s specifications.

    2. Refrigerant Charge – Technician shall follow manufacturer’s guidelines when charging a new system and make any needed adjustments for non-standard line set lengths using a programmable refrigerant charging scale.

    3. Electric Wiring – When attached to the exterior walls shall be in conduit to protect them from contact and exposure. All field wiring, line and low voltage, shall comply with the manufacturer’s recommendations, the National Electrical Code and all applicable local codes and ordinances. All interior wiring is to run along walls where possible and along the edge of the ceiling where it is necessary to run on the ceiling.

    4. Filters – Indoor unit shall come with air filters installed from the factory.

    5. Ductless – The heat pump will be fully ductless. Units using any type of field installed duct system are NOT eligible.

    1. Noise and Vibration Abatement

    1. Outdoor units should be located to avoid transmission of objectionable noise to adjacent properties, sleeping areas or other areas where noise control is critical. Outdoor units shall comply with all state and local noise control ordinances. The LA shall be responsible for any modifications necessary to reduce noise. Unit base shall not be connected to the foundation.

    1. Refrigerant Piping: This section applies to the copper refrigerant line sets

    1. Materials – Field-supplied refrigerant piping shall be clean, dehydrated, sealed and seamless copper tubing or the manufacturer’s pre-charged tubing. Fittings shall be wrought copper. Field supplied tubing shall be evacuated to 500 microns and purged and pressure tested as per manufacturer’s recommendation, soft solders shall not be permitted.

    2. Sizing – To maintain oil return to the compressor and avoid inefficiency and capacity loss, refrigeration piping or refrigeration line set shall be sized and installed in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions and recommendations. Piping between the two sections of split units shall not exceed the manufacturer’s maximum recommended length, horizontally or vertically, and shall be run parallel to building lines and in a straight and workmanlike manner to prevent oil traps.

    3. Support – Refrigerant piping shall be properly supported in accordance with manufacturer’s specifications, AHRI and IMC (International Mechanical Code).

    4. Penetrations – Refrigerant piping passing through openings in the unit cabinet or the building structure shall be installed to prevent wear or sound generation due to contact with the cabinet or building structure. All penetrations in the envelope of the building shall be properly sealed with an insulative sealant.

    5. Insulation – Refrigerant lines shall be insulated with a minimum of ½” thick continuous closed-cell foam rubber. Insulation must cover entire line set length. Where refrigeration line sets run on the exterior of the building they shall have a rigid line hide weatherproof covering.

    6. Leak Testing, Evacuation and Charging – Factory as well as field-fabricated joints shall be checked, and any leaks found shall be repaired. Evacuation and charging shall be done in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions and recommendations.

    1. Condensate System

    1. Condensate Drain – Line shall slope downhill to allow for gravity flow of condensate to terminate outside of the building.

    2. Piping Material – Condensate drain piping shall meet IMC and should be copper, plastic or other corrosion-resistant material.

    3. Drains – Condensate drain lines shall run to an open drain or location outside of the building foundation. Condensate shall not drain onto areas where ice formation may create a hazard (walkways etc.). Under no circumstances may condensate be drained into a crawl space or direct connected into a sewer line.

    4. Condensate Pump – Condensate pumps are not recommended unless there is no other alternative. If a condensation pump must be installed, follow the manufacturer’s installation requirements.12.6.7 Indoor Thermostats

    1. Indoor Thermostats

    1. Wireless Remote Control: A wireless remote control is standard equipment for adjusting the indoor comfort. Wireless remote controls are to be provided to the building owner.

    1. Existing Equipment

    1. Existing Heaters: The building is currently heated by existing heaters. The heater located in the same area as the heat pump is to be disabled and left in place. The corresponding thermostat is to be disabled and also left in place. The other heaters are to remain operational; this includes those within the bedrooms of the apartments and those in the common areas.

    1. Damages

    1. The LA will be held responsible for any and all damages created during the performance of the work.

    2. All debris resulting from the work will be removed and legally disposed of with every effort made toward recycling waste material.

    1. Disclaimer: If a conflict between this policy and the local building department’s equipment installation requirements, the local building official’s requirements take precedence. For complete information regarding installation requirements, features, benefits, operation, and maintenance, review the manufacturer’s installation manual of the product being installed.


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