Weatherization Manual Policies and Procedures Supporting Documents for United States Department of Energy (doe) United States Department of Health and Human Services (hhs) Bonneville Power Administration



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SECTION 9.5 SMOKE Detectors, CARBON MONOXIDE (co) DETECTORS, AND FIRE EXTINGUISHERS

  • A. Policy


    1. Smoke Detectors: Installation of smoke detectors is allowed where detectors are not present or are inoperable. Replacement of operable smoke detectors is not an allowable cost. When installed, smoke detectors shall be installed in accordance with manufacturer’s requirements.

      1. Detector standards

    1. Detectors installed by the local agency shall have a minimum ten-year operating life, and shall be clearly marked as "UL approved."

      1. Detector power options

    1. Detector shall be powered by one of the following methods:

    1. Hardwired: Hardwired detectors are allowable only when the installation is approved in advance by Commerce. Hardwired detectors shall have a lithium battery backup.

    2. Battery-operated: Battery-operated detectors shall have a lithium battery. They shall make an audible alarm when the battery is at the end of its life cycle.

    1. Exceptions:

    1. Existing hardwired smoke detectors that are not working may be replaced with a new hardwired smoke alarm.

    2. Smoke alarms with a visual alarm for hearing impaired individuals shall be installed in addition to a standard smoke alarm.

      1. Labeling devices

    1. All installed detectors shall be labeled in a permanent fashion with a visible date of installation while detector is mounted on the wall.

      1. Manufacturer's instructions

    1. The manufacturer's instructions including the owner‘s manual, warranty, and the expected lifetime of the unit information shall be left with the occupant of the dwelling unit.

      1. Education of dwelling unit occupants

    1. Local agency shall provide the occupant(s) of the dwelling unit with verbal and written information regarding the operation of the smoke detector(s), the importance of testing, and battery replacement.

      1. Installation location(s) for smoke detectors

    1. Smoke detectors shall be installed on walls or ceilings per manufacturer's requirements.

      1. Testing

    1. Local agency shall test each detector for proper operation after installation.

    1. Carbon Monoxide (CO) Detectors: Local agencies shall install a minimum of one carbon monoxide (CO) detector in every dwelling unit where detectors are not present or are inoperable. Replacement of operable CO detectors is not an allowable cost. CO detectors shall be installed in accordance with manufacturer’s requirements.

      1. Detector standards: Detectors shall have:

    1. A 5-year warranty for residential models or 1-year warranty for commercial low-level models.

    2. An electrochemical sensor.

    3. A digital display that indicates CO levels in Parts Per Million (ppm).

    4. The capability to accurately detect and display low levels of carbon monoxide to 15 ppm.

    5. A label to verify testing and listing to the UL 2034 Standard.

    1. Exception: CO Detectors need not be UL listed if a low level detector is desired. To comply with this exception, these commercial low-level detectors must meet or exceed all of the following:

            1. (1) through (4) above.

            2. ACGIH and NIOSH Standards.

      1. Detector power options

    1. Hardwired detectors: Hardwired detectors are allowable. Hardwired detectors shall have a 9-volt, lithium battery backup.

    2. Battery-operated detectors: Battery-operated detectors shall have a lithium battery. They shall make an audible alarm when the battery is at the end of its life cycle.

    3. Plug-in detectors: Plug-in detectors shall have a tamper-resistant connection to a continuously energized 120-v AC power source. They shall not be on a switched plug or on a GFCI protected circuit. Plug-in detectors shall have a battery backup.

      1. Labeling devices

    1. All installed detectors shall be labeled in a permanent fashion with the date of installation or replace-by-date as per manufacture’s specification is visible while detector is mounted on the wall.

      1. Manufacturer's instructions

    1. The manufacturer's instructions including the owner’s manual, warranty, and the expected lifetime of the unit information shall be left with the occupant of the dwelling unit.

      1. Education of dwelling unit occupants:

    1. Local agencies shall provide the occupant(s) of the dwelling unit with verbal and written information regarding the following:

        1. Dangers of CO.

        2. How to operate and reset the CO detector.

        3. How to read the CO detector.

        4. How to respond to CO levels above 10 ppm.

        5. How to change the batteries.

      1. Installation location(s) for CO detectors

    1. In dwelling units with combustion appliances or attached garages a minimum of one operable carbon monoxide detector shall be installed in the vicinity of each sleeping area and on each level with a combustion appliance.

    2. Detectors must not be located contrary to manufacturer’s specifications. Where practical, detectors shall be mounted:

        1. In a visible location.

        2. On walls between five (5) and six (6) feet from the floor.

        3. No closer than five (5) feet from combustion appliances, chimneys, flues, or inside corners.

      1. Installation in sleeping rooms

    1. A CO detector shall be installed inside any closable sleeping room that contains a combustion appliance.

      1. Testing

    1. Local agency shall test each detector for proper operation after installation as per test procedures in the owner’s manual provided by the manufacturer.

    1. Fire Extinguishers: Providing Fire Extinguishers is allowed only when solid fuel is present.

    1. Allowable Costs

    2. Smoke detector, carbon monoxide detector, and fire extinguisher installation is an allowable health and safety cost under DOE, HHS, BPA, and MM funds. This measure falls within the total health and safety measures and repairs limits. These measures do not need to be included in the SIR calculation for all fund sources or in the DOE per home expenditure average. See Chapter 6, Allowable Costs, for allowable expenditures

    3. Specific fund source limitations or allowances are as follows:

    4. BPA: Units must be electrically heated in BPA service territory.


    5. B. Procedure


    1. Programmatic

      1. Client files must include documentation of the following:

        1. Carbon monoxide detector installation.

        2. Detector location(s).

        3. Detector model type.

        4. Delivery of consumer conservation education.

      2. Local agencies must keep a copy of carbon monoxide detector model specifications for all models installed in agency files.

      3. See Chapter 6, Allowable Costs.



    1. Effective Date: July 2017 Page 1 of 5

    2. Weatherization Policy

    3. See also:

    4. Policy 5.1.3, Deferral Standards

    5. Exhibit 5.5A, Weatherization Deferral Form example

    6. RCW 59.18.060

    7. Exhibit 5.S1, Mold Assessment and Release Form example

    8. A Brief Guide to Mold, Moisture and Your Home

    9. http://www.epa.gov/mold/moldresources.html

    10. A Brief Guide to Mold in the Workplace

    11. Policy 5.4.2, Attic Insulation

    12. Policy 5.4.4, Floor Insulation

    13. Section 9.1, Local Agency and/or Subcontractor Health and Safety

    14. Policy 9.3, Indoor Air Quality - Mechanical Ventilation

    15. www.AHAM.org

    16. Variance #7 – SWS Sections 2.0402.1a-e and 2.0402.2b

    17. Replaces: Policy 9.6 – July 2016 Variance #16 – SWS Sections 5.3002.4b and 5.3002.13b

    18. Policy 9.6 BIOLOGICALS AND UNSANITARY CONDITIONS, INCLUDING MOLD AND MOISTURE

    19. Remediation or repair of conditions leading to, or promoting, biologicals and unsanitary conditions, including mold and moisture related problems is allowed within the guidelines as detailed in this section.

    1. Biological concerns and unsanitary conditions (odors, mustiness, bacteria, viruses, raw sewage, rotting wood, etc.): Remediation of conditions that may lead to or promote biological concerns and unsanitary conditions is allowed. Remediation does not include septic system repair or replacement. Addressing bacteria and viruses is not an allowable cost. Deferral may be necessary in cases where a known agent is present in a home that may create a serious risk to occupants or weatherization workers. See Policy 5.1.3, Deferral Standards. For rentals, sanitary conditions are the landlord’s responsibility. Local agency must inform the owner of their legal responsibilities and liabilities under RCW 59.18.060.

    2. Mold:

    1. Documentation of mold condition(s): Local agency shall record mold conditions found prior to weatherization in the client file. See Exhibit 5.S1, Mold Assessment and Release Form example. Documentation shall include the location and an estimate of the area in square feet as well as photographs and a narrative description of all observed mold conditions found on surfaces in the unit. Where severe mold and moisture issues cannot be addressed, deferral is required. See Policy 5.1.3, Deferral Standards.

    1. Variance #16: DOE granted a variance from SWS Sections 5.3002.4b and 5.3002.13b Mold and Asbestos Testing allowing: WA does not allow mold testing. WA allows, but does not require asbestos testing.

    2. Wx Policy 9.6 Biologicals and Unsanitary Conditions, Including Mold and Moisture Page 2 of 5

    1. Client pre-work notification: If weatherization work will be done, the local agency shall provide to the occupant and owner of the dwelling unit a written description of the proposed work that is to be performed, which includes notification that the work to be performed is expected to alleviate the mold and moisture creating conditions. The occupant and owner shall sign a statement acknowledging receipt of the information. A copy of the signed statement and the pre-weatherization mold report shall be retained in the client file. See Exhibit 5.S1, Mold Assessment and Release Form example.

    1. Exception: Multi-family dwellings five (5) units and greater do not require tenant signature on the Mold Assessment and Release form unless mold conditions are identified in the unit. Although Local Agencies must perform a Pollution Source Survey and Mold Assessment for each unit and document occurrences, separate forms for each unit are not required. The owner’s representative may sign off for the unit-by-unit Mold Assessment and Release and Pollution Source Survey.

    1. Additional client notification materials: In dwelling units where mold conditions have been identified, the Local Agency shall give to the dwelling's occupant(s) a copy of the EPA booklet "A Brief Guide to Mold, Moisture, and Your Home" available at (http://www.epa.gov/mold/moldresources.html) before the start of any work. Local agency shall document in the client file that this booklet was received by the occupant(s). This verification will include a signed statement from the occupant(s) that they received the EPA booklet.

    2. Worker training: Local agency shall provide training in the mold inspection and documentation protocols established by the Department of Energy for all staff charged with assessing projects for weatherization. Procedures for worker protection are found in U.S. Department of Labor Occupational Safety and Health (OSHA)
      “A Brief Guide to Mold in the Workplace.”
      See also Section 9.1, Local Agency and/or Subcontractor Health and Safety.

    1. Moisture Related Problems: Limited water damage repairs that can be addressed by weatherization workers and correction of moisture and mold creating conditions are allowed when necessary in order to weatherize the home and to ensure the long term stability and durability of the measures.

    1. Local agency shall identify and document in the client file problems in the dwelling unit resulting from high moisture levels. The cause or source of the high moisture levels shall be alleviated prior to the completion of weatherization services. Where remediation cannot be accomplished with available funds, weatherization services shall be deferred until the cause or source of the problem(s) has been alleviated. See Policy 5.1.3, Deferral Standards. See also Exhibit 5.5A, Weatherization Deferral Form example.

      1. Plumbing: Prior to completion of weatherization services the local agency or Property Owner shall repair any plumbing leak found to be wetting insulation and/or floor, wall, or ceiling components of the dwelling.

    1. Wx Policy 9.6 Biologicals and Unsanitary Conditions, Including Mold and Moisture Page 3 of 5

      1. Roof: Local agency shall inspect the roof, flashing details, and penetrations for indications of leaks prior to insulating. Attics or ceiling cavities may be insulated when, in the judgment of the local agency, the roof in its current or repaired condition following a weatherization repair is expected to last, without leaking, a minimum of five (5) years. Attics covered by roofs that do not meet this standard shall not be insulated. Refer to Policy 5.4.2, Attic Insulation.

      2. Inside surfaces of roof framing/sheathing: Local agency shall inspect the inside surfaces of the roof framing and sheathing for indicators such as mold, rot, water damage, condensation, etc., that pose heat loss, indoor air quality, health, safety and/or durability problems. If these problems exist, the cause of the problem shall be corrected before completion of weatherization.

      3. Drainage, gutters, down spouts, extensions, flashings, sump pumps, landscape, and related items: If necessary to prevent rainwater from entering the crawlspace or basement, missing or faulty gutter or downspout components shall be repaired or installed.

    1. Major drainage issues are beyond the scope of the Weatherization Assistance Program. Homes with conditions that require more than incidental repair must be deferred.

    2. Variance #7: DOE granted a variance from SWS Sections 2.0402.1a-e and 2.0402.2b Moisture and Drainage allowing: WA does NOT require grading, water proofing or foundation wall exterior drain, crawlspace grading, or sump pump install.

      1. Below grade vents and penetrations in foundation walls: When crawlspace vents and other penetrations are found to be installed below grade they shall be inspected to determine whether water from outside is entering the crawlspace through the vents or penetrations. Local agency shall eliminate the path of water into crawlspace through the vents or penetrations.

      2. Ground cover: All crawlspaces shall have ground cover installed as outlined in Policy 5.4.4, Floor Insulation, #3 Ground Cover.

      3. Sump pumps: A sump pump may be repaired or replaced to prevent water from accumulating under a dwelling.

      4. Mechanical crawlspace ventilation: In crawlspaces with seasonal standing water an exhaust fan may be installed.

      5. Source specific ventilation: See Policy 9.3, Indoor Air Quality - Mechanical Ventilation. A working exhaust fan shall be present in:

    1. Kitchens with gas combustion appliances.

    1. Wx Policy 9.6 Biologicals and Unsanitary Conditions, Including Mold and Moisture Page 4 of 5

    1. Any bathroom with a working shower or bathtub.

    1. Exceptions:

            1. Bath exhaust may not be required where occupancy and usage patterns indicate infrequent use and there is no evidence of moisture problems. The reason for not installing a fan must be documented in the client file.

            2. Bath exhaust may not be required when whole building ventilation is functioning as designed.

      1. Whole building ventilation: A whole building ventilation system may be installed to alleviate high moisture conditions. See Policy 9.3, Indoor Air Quality - Mechanical Ventilation.

      2. Client controlled conditions: Local agency shall inform the client of any observed client controlled conditions contributing to high moisture levels in the dwelling. Local agency shall document in the client file those recommendations that would help lower moisture levels.

      3. Dehumidifiers: A dehumidifier may be replaced, repaired or installed to prevent water damage to a dwelling unit having persistent and unresolved high moisture levels.

    1. Post-weatherization dehumidifier installation: Local agencies made aware of a moisture problem developing as a result of, or still remaining after, installation of weatherization measures may return to a closed weatherization job. Local agency may install a dehumidifier, if it is determined to be the most effective and cost-efficient method for reducing moisture buildup.

    1. Dehumidifier: The installation of a dehumidifier is allowable, provided it is determined to be the most effective and cost-efficient method of reducing moisture problems or high moisture buildup in a home. Dehumidifiers shall be installed only after other measures with less of an energy penalty have been found ineffective at reducing moisture problems.

      1. EnergyStar rated and AHAM certified: The dehumidifier installed shall be Energy Star rated and certified by the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) Specification DH‑1 (www.AHAM.org).

    1. Wx Policy 9.6 Biologicals and Unsanitary Conditions, Including Mold and Moisture Page 5 of 5

      1. Sizing: Local agency shall size dehumidifiers for installation according to the general guidelines below. Dehumidifier shall be controlled by a humidistat to automatically maintain the desired humidity level. Dehumidifier capacity shall be determined by the rated capacity test contained in AHAM Specification DH‑1.

    1. Floor Area of House

    2. (sq. ft.)

    1. Dehumidifier Capacity

    2. (Pints/24 hours)

    1. Up to 1,000

    1. 25

    1. 1,000‑2,000

    1. 30

    1. 2,000‑3,000

    1. 35



      1. Low temperature location: When the dehumidifier is to be located in a basement or other area where the normal operating temperatures are expected to be below
        65 degrees Fahrenheit, the local agency shall install a dehumidifier rated to operate in “low temperature” conditions.

      2. Electrical safety: Local agency shall observe all manufacturer warnings regarding electrical safety. Local agency shall not allow drain hoses, water drainage, or disposal near electrical circuits, cords, or devices.

      3. Hose to drain required: Local agency shall install a hose to drain the dehumidifier's water bucket. Hose shall be mechanically attached to the water bucket outlet and terminate at a drain or sump. Hose installed shall not create a tripping hazard.


    1. SECTION 9.7 ELECTRICAL

    2. A. Policy


    1. Electrical, other than Knob-and-Tube Wiring

      1. Minor electrical repairs are allowed where health or safety of the occupant is at risk.

      2. Upgrades and repairs are allowed when necessary to perform specific weatherization measures.

    1. Electrical, Knob-and-Tube Wiring

      1. Minor upgrades and repairs necessary for weatherization measures and where the health or safety of the occupant is at risk are allowed.

      2. Local agency must provide sufficient over-current protection prior to insulating over knob-and-tube wiring.


    1. B. Procedure


    1. Programmatic

      1. Client files must include the following documentation:

        1. Knob-and-Tube inspection report performed by a licensed electrician.

        2. Minor electrical repair justification.

        3. Paid invoices for all work done by a licensed electrician.



    1. Effective Date: July 2017 Page 1 of 4

    2. Weatherization Policy

    3. See also:

    4. Final Rule, 40 CFR Part 745, Subpart E, Residential Property Renovation, Pre-Renovation Lead Information Rule

    5. Policy 5.1.3, Deferral Standards

    6. EPA - Renovate Right: Important Lead Hazard Information for Families, Child Care Providers, and Schools

    7. EPA - Small Entity Compliance Guide to Renovate Right

    8. Exhibit 9.8A, Pre-Renovation Form

    9. Exhibit 9.8B, Test Kit Documentation Form

    10. Exhibit 9.8C, Renovation Recordkeeping Checklist

    11. WPN 08-6, Interim LSW Guidance with Attachments

    12. Replaces: Policy 9.8 - July 2016 WPN 09-6, LSW Additional Materials and Information

    13. POLICY 9.8 Lead Based Paint

    1. Lead Compliance: All weatherization agencies must comply with the requirements of both Lead Safe Weatherization (LSWx) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Lead; Renovation, Repair and Painting Program (RRP) Final Rule, 40 CFR Part 745, Subpart E, Residential Property Renovation, Pre-Renovation Lead Information Rule or applicable state Washington Administrative Code (WAC).

    2. Lead Safe Weatherization Protocols apply to dwelling units:

    1. Constructed before 1978; presumed lead based paint.

    1. Exception: Dwelling unit tested and determined to be free of lead based paint.

    1. Tested positive for lead.

    1. Following Protocols: Local agencies must follow both LSWx and RRP protocols. Lead Safe Weatherization includes compliance with the current EPA Renovation, Repair and Paint Rule.

    1. Credentials: All work in target housing (pre-1978 homes or test positive for lead) must have:

    1. A Certified Renovator assigned to the project.

    2. LSWx trained workers, crews, contractors, subcontractors, and monitors if they are disturbing paint.

    1. Exception: Workers who are in their first nine months of employment are exempt from the worker certification requirement, but they must be working with a certified lead safe weatherization worker any time they are performing lead safe weatherization work.

    1. Audit: All homes must receive a comprehensive, on-site, home energy audit prior to receiving weatherization services. Include the cost of this audit in the average cost per home.

    1. Wx Policy 9.8 Lead Based Paint Page 2 of 4

    1. Containment: Per LSWx, lead containment is ALWAYS required in target housing (pre-1978 homes or test positive for lead):

    1. Level 1 containment is required for less than or equal to de-minimus level work.

    2. Level 2 containment is required for more than de-minimus level work.

    1. Cleaning: After all lead work, cleaning is required.

    1. Exception: Work on de-minimus level is allowed without clean verification

    2. Exception to the Exception: The de-minimus level exemption shall NOT apply to any of the following work:

    1. Window replacement,

    2. Demolition of painted surface areas, or

    3. Using any of the prohibited work practices, including but not limited to:

            1. Open-flame burning or torching;

            2. Machines to remove paint through high-speed operation without HEPA exhaust control;

            3. Operating a heat gun at temperatures at or above 1100 degrees Fahrenheit.

    1. Lead Documentation: Local agency must document in the client file all of the following that apply:

    1. Presumed Lead: Exhibit 9.8B, Test Kit Documentation Form, or equivalent is required when lead based paint is presumed to exist in the dwelling unit.

    2. Testing Lead: Exhibit 9.8B, Test Kit Documentation Form or XRF testing documentation is required for any lead testing. Documentation must include: the test results performed to identify lead based paint hazards, location, who performed the test, name of renovator.

    3. LSWx Work Performed: Exhibit 9.8C, Renovation Recordkeeping Checklist, or equivalent is required when any work disturbing painted surfaces is performed on a dwelling unit which presumed or test positive for lead. Documentation must include the information listed on the Checklist, at a minimum.

    4. Photos: Photo documentation that LSWx was properly implemented (e.g. photos of the site, lead safe containment set-up, etc.) Photos are required if presumed or test positive for lead. (See WPN 08-6).

    1. Lead Levels: As a result of the work, the OSHA/DOSH airborne lead level will not exceed 30 micrograms per cubic meter.

    1. Training and Worker certification: All individuals (Auditors, QCI, Wx Workers, Crew, Contractors, Subcontractors, and Certified Renovators) and firms performing weatherization work and disturbing paint in target housing (pre 1978 and test positive for lead) must have the following training and worker certification:

    1. Wx Policy 9.8 Lead Based Paint Page 3 of 4

    1. Lead Safe Weatherization and Work Practices (LSWx “benchmark”) training based on the Montana State University (MSU) curriculum and receive a certificate of completion from the federal or state agency, or state approved training entity; and

    2. Renovation, Repair, and Painting (RRP) training and must be a current Certified Renovator.

    1. Exception: Lead Risk Assessor certification will suffice for the RRP certified renovator requirement.

    2. The Work Practices component shall be hands-on training, and include all of the 11 required RRP hands-on activities, plus an additional four (4) hours of hands-on training in work practices that includes setting up a window J-bag and performing a window change-out; performing a thermostat change-out; setting up a trough for an exterior wall drill and practicing drilling using water mist, shaving cream and a shrouded drill hooked up to a HEPA vac; drilling through sheetrock using mist, shaving cream and a vac held near the hole saw; setting up a zip wall; and performing a HEPA vac filter change-out.

    1. Documenting Records of Certification: Local agency shall keep records of certification at the local agency's office for all workers performing lead safe work. Subcontractors shall provide the local agency with records of certification of workers who are performing lead safe weatherization work.

    1. Lead Safe Wx Costs:

    1. The cost of LSWx (labor, material, and related costs) is a health and safety cost (H&S), insofar as it exceeds the cost of allowable energy conservation measures (WxM). Charge the cost effective LSWx amount to WxM where you still achieve an SIR>1, then charge the remainder to H&S.

    2. Equipment purchases used specifically for testing for lead or other health risks are a health and safety cost.

    1. Defer Homes beyond the Scope of Wx: Deferral is required when the extent and condition of lead based paint in the house would potentially create further health and safety hazards. See Policy 5.1.3, Deferral Standards.

    1. Client Notification: A lead hazard information pamphlet and written notification of the scope, location, and expected starting and completion dates of proposed work will be provided to owners and tenants of homes and multi-family housing built prior to 1978. See Exhibit 9.8A, Pre-Renovation Form. If a determination is made in accordance with applicable EPA rules that lead based paint is not present in the areas affected by the proposed work, a copy of the determination must be included with the notice.

      1. Local agencies will provide the EPA pamphlet, “Renovate Right: Important Lead Hazard Information for Families, Child Care Providers, and Schools” or reproductions of it when copied and presented in full before renovation activities begin.

    1. Wx Policy 9.8 Lead Based Paint Page 4 of 4

      1. Notification will be provided in the native language of the client if EPA has made non-English versions of the pamphlet available. If a pamphlet in the client’s native language is not available, the English version shall be presented.

      2. Notification by certified mail must be provided no more than 60 days and no fewer than seven (7) days before renovation activities begin. The notification requirement applies even if only common areas, and not individual dwelling units, will have worked performed.

    1. Client Receipt Documentation: Local agency shall document in the client file that the occupant(s) received the EPA pamphlet. Local agencies must secure written acknowledgement that the owner has received notification. If the property is a rental, local agencies must obtain written acknowledgment from the tenant head of household. See the EPA Small Entity Compliance Guide to Renovate Right.

    1. If local agencies are unable to secure written acknowledgement from an adult occupant, the local agencies must comply with one of the following:

      1. Certify in writing that notification has been delivered to the dwelling and that the local agency has been unsuccessful in obtaining a written acknowledgment. See the Future Sample Pre-Renovation Form as found in the EPA pamphlet, “Renovate Right: Important Lead Hazard Information for Families, Child Care Providers, and Schools”.

      2. Obtain a certificate of mailing at least seven (7) days prior to the renovation.





    1. Effective Date: July 2016 Page 1 of 3

    2. Weatherization Policy

    3. See also:

    4. Competent Person-Asbestos (per WAC 296-62-07728)

    5. WA State Certified Asbestos Supervisor (per WAC 296-62-07703

    6. Exhibit 9.9, Asbestos Standard Operating Procedures (SOP)

    7. Policy 5.1.3, Deferral Standards

    8. www.epa.gov

    9. An Introduction to Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Asbestos

    10. Asbestos in the Home

    11. Replaces: Section 9.9 – July 2013 Variance #16 – SWS Sections 5.3002.4b and 5.3002.13b

    12. POlicy 9.9 ASBESTOS

    13. Disturbing Asbestos Containing Material (ACM) in the course of performing weatherization work is allowed by properly trained and certified workers.

    1. Competent Person – Asbestos Required: When ACM is present or assumed, and will be disturbed during the course of work, a local agency shall contract with a Certified Asbestos Firm or utilize properly trained and certified workers Competent Person - Asbestos (per WAC 296-62-07728). For examples see Exhibit 9.9, Asbestos Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) specific to the materials being disturbed. These SOP examples were prepared by a WA State Certified Asbestos Supervisor (per WAC 296-62-07703).

    2. Defer Work: Local agencies may defer specific measure(s) or the entire weatherization project due to ACM. See Policy 5.1.3 Deferral Standards.

    3. Asbestos Abatement Prohibited: Asbestos abatement is not approved as a health and safety weatherization cost.

    4. Client Notification: Local Agencies must provide asbestos safety information to every client. The following booklets are available at EPA’s website www.epa.gov: An Introduction to Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) and Asbestos and Asbestos in the Home. Local agency shall document in the client file that the occupant received the asbestos safety information.

    5. Diagnostic Testing Restricted: When friable ACM is present or assumed a blower door test shall not be performed.

    6. Asbestos Testing: Testing material(s) for ACM is allowable. All testing must be performed by a certified Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA) Building Inspector. If a local agency tests for ACM, test results must be provided to the client. Include in client file, test results and client signature of the receipt of test results.

    1. Variance #16: DOE granted a variance from SWS Sections 5.3002.4b and 5.3002.13b Mold and Asbestos Testing allowing: WA does not allow mold testing. WA allows, but does not require asbestos testing.

    2. Wx Policy 9.9 Asbestos Page 2 of 3

    1. Building Surfaces:

      1. Removal of siding is allowed to perform energy conservation measures. All precautions must be taken not to damage siding. Asbestos siding should never be cut or drilled. Where possible, insulate through home interior.

      2. For incidental removal or disturbance of acoustical ceiling texture (ACT) sometimes referred to as “popcorn” the local agency Competent Person-Asbestos must follow a Standard Operating Procedure (SOP). For example, see Exhibit 9.9, Asbestos Standard Operating Procedures (SOP).

    2. Vermiculite:

      1. Once vermiculite is observed, do not disturb the vermiculite or any surfaces supporting or enclosing it. Examples: Do not enter attic. Do not cut hole for fan. If vermiculite is observed in wall (evident in crawlspaces or around outlets or junction boxes) do not cut into wall.

    1. Exception: In situations where protection of the client living area can be established, weatherization work may continue by workers with the proper training, certification, and a Standard Operating Procedure.

      1. Commerce does not recommend asbestos testing on vermiculite as it is not a homogenous material and the results are not conclusive.

      2. Removal (abatement) is not allowed.

      3. When vermiculite insulation is observed in walls or attic, do not perform blower door testing.

    1. Asbestos tape and covering materials on pipes, ducts, furnaces, and other small covered surfaces:

      1. Assume asbestos is present in covering materials.

      2. Encapsulation is allowed by a Competent Person-Asbestos. The local agency must follow a Standard Operating Procedure (SOP).

      3. Removal may be allowed by a Competent Person-Asbestos on a case by case basis.

      4. If asbestos tape is observed inside the duct, no diagnostic testing shall be performed prior to encapsulation.

    1. Wx Policy 9.9 Asbestos Page 3 of 3
    2. Procedure


    1. Programmatic

      1. Client files must include the following documentation:

        1. Signed and dated acknowledgments of receipt of asbestos safety information.

        2. ACM test results.

        3. Paid invoices for all contractor billing including tests done by an AHERA inspector.

      2. Contractor and crew certifications.



    1. Effective Date: July 1, 2016 Page 1 of 1

    2. Weatherization Policy

    3. See also:

    4. https://www.epa.gov/radon

    5. EPA – Consumer’s Guide to Radon Reduction: How to Fix your Home

    6. Replaces: Policy 9.10 – July 2012 EPA - A Citizen’s Guide to Radon

    7. POLICY 9.10 Radon

    1. Ground Cover: Whenever site conditions permit, local agencies must cover exposed dirt with a vapor barrier.

    2. Radon Testing: Local agencies are allowed to test for radon in locations with high radon potential.

    3. Client Notification: Regardless of the level of radon discovered in the home, local agencies must provide radon information to all clients. Local agency must document in the client file that the occupant(s) received the radon safety information.

      1. High Radon Levels: Local agencies must provide EPA’s “Consumer’s Guide to Radon Reduction: How to Fix Your Home” to any clients in homes with known high radon levels. Local agency must document in the client file that the occupant(s) received the EPA pamphlet.

    1. Defer Work: In homes with identified radon problem, work that would exacerbate this problem must be deferred.

    2. Radon Abatement Prohibited: Radon abatement is not an allowable activity under the Weatherization Program. However, those costs associated with taking precautions in a dwelling known to have radon problems are allowable weatherization expenditures. These costs are allowable if an energy audit indicates that weatherization techniques would help in radon remediation.

    3. Establish Radon-Related Strategies: Local agencies must establish sound radon-related strategies in doing weatherization work on homes and taking precautions in homes where there may be a radon concern.

    4. Radon Mitigation Notification: If radon levels are found to be present in the home, prior to beginning work installing a mitigation system, the local agency must provide Commerce with evidence this alteration meets all of the following:

      1. Allowed by the local authority having jurisdiction (ie: building department),

      2. Meets all applicable codes, and

      3. SIR of 1 or greater, other than allowable Health and Safety components.
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