Voice procedure exercises



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VOICE PROCEDURE EXERCISES

08/03/14
These voice procedure exercises are designed to provide EMCOMM members with the information needed to handle a high volume of traffic as fast and accurately as possible. These are the most important exercises to perform.

Most of the time, even during emergencies, things will move at a relatively leisurely pace. The local repeater(s) will be up and every station will be full quieting. Most of time! However...
What happens when everything is so busy, even two frequencies would not handle the traffic? Or the repeater(s) are down or don't have the coverage needed? Or the signal paths are weak and/or noisy (especially HF). This is a worse case situation. These worse case situations occur often enough to justify training for them.
Procedure words (prowords) will go a long way to ensure that the traffic gets through even in worst case situations. The following exercises will familiarize operators with the operating procedures that are the accepted procedures in the ARRL and even MARS and CAP.
The proword(s) of interest in an exercise are defined and demonstrated. They are CAPITALIZED in BOLD and UNDERLINED so that they stand out from the other prowords which are used to demonstrate realism. All prowords and tactical call signs are CAPITALIZED so they stand out as well. Tactical call signs are used to instill realism and provide practice in using them in conjunction with the Amateur call signs.
Other procedures are ones that need to be followed by each operator when they have to fill a certain position (EMCOMM Lead, Net Control, etc...) or have certain responsibilities.
NOTE: The station called is always the first identified and the calling station is second. The individual amateur stations need to identify only themselves with their amateur call sign.
We will start with the phonetic pronunciation of the letters and figures (numbers). They are all distinct so that there will be no misunderstanding of what is being said. We will use the International Phonetic Alphabet that is taught by the ARRL and MARS. This alphabet is used by all federal and some state and local agencies. There are others used by other state and local agencies and they serve the same purpose.
PHONETIC ALPAHEBET (Alpha) PRONUNCIATION
LETTER WORD PRONUNCIATION
A ALPHA AL-FAH

B BRAVO BRAH-VOH

C CHARLIE CHAR-LEE

D DELTA DELL-TAH

E ECHO ECK-0H

F FOXTROT FOKS-TROT

G GOLF GOLF

H HOTEL HO-TELL

I INDIA IN-DEE-AH

J JULIET JEW-LEE-ETT

K KILO KEY-LOH

L LIMA LEE-MAH

M MIKE MIKE

N NOVEMBER NO-VEM-BER

O OSCAR OSS-KER

P PAPA PAP-PAH

Q QUEBEC KAY-BECK

R ROMEO ROW-ME-OH

S SIERRA SEE-AIR-RAH

T TANGO TANG-GO

U UNIFORM YOU-NEE-FORM

V VICTOR VIK-TOR

W WHISKEY WISS-KEY

X X-RAY ECKS-RAY

Y YANKEE YANG-KEY

Z ZULU ZOO-LOO


FIGURE (Number) PRONUNCIATION
0 ZEE-ROW

1 WUN


2 TOO

3 THA-REE

4 FO-WER

5 FIFE


6 SIX

7 SE-VEN


8 AIT

9 NIN-ER


There will be times where the traffic that we are asked to send may be from a standard form. Most probably ICS forms. Many of these forms will have numbered blocks with required information in them. This can actually make things easier for the operators. And example is the ICS 209 (Incident Status Summary) where they are sent at least twice a day from an ICP to and EOC and/or other required locations. Some times there are very few changes in the report. Maybe, on a fire, there will more acreage burned or more containment. Those blocks will have updates to them. Perhaps this occurred on a different shift than the last report and therefore will be signed by someone else with a different position title. If the previous report was taken by voice and entered on a computer and saved then that message can be retrieved. Once that is done then all that needs to be changed is those entries that require it. And then save this message under a different title so it can be found again. This takes a lot less time that resending and copying the whole message all over again.
For the text of messages, in some cases using, just the paragraph, line and word numbers can locate a word or phrase that the receiving station may have missed.
But with practice utilizing both the phonetic alphabet and prowords will allow operators to copy traffic very well.

PROWORDS
EXERCISE ON PROWORDS - THIS IS, OUT, OVER AND CLOSE
The prowords THIS IS, OUT, OVER and CLOSE are used very often and are probably the most common, and are used by every possible professional or amateur communications organization. They are the prowords to use to keep the one way conversations from getting confused and information from getting lost.
THIS IS means that this transmission is from the station whose call sign immediately follows. OVER is the proword used when one operator is finished with his transmission and wants the other operator know that it's their turn. OUT lets everyone on frequency know that an operator is finished with, and is terminating the contact. CLOSE is used when the station is going off of the air.
Example:
NORTH RELAY: SANTA LUSIA EOC, THIS IS NORTH RELAY. OVER.
SANTA LUSIA EOC: THIS IS SANTA LUSIA EOC. OVER.
NORTH RELAY: What is your public safety communications situation

status. OVER.


SANTA LUSIA EOC: All public safety communications are down. OVER.
NORTH RELAY: ROGER. N6???. OUT.
SANTA LUSIA EOC: WA6!!!. OUT.

NORTH RELAY: CALIFORNIA, THIS IS NORTH RELAY. OVER.


CALIFORNIA: THIS IS CALIFORNIA. Go ahead NORTH RELAY. OVER.
NORTH RELAY: SANTA LUSIA EOC reports that all public safety communications are down.

OVER.
CALIFORNIA: ROGER. I will notify the State Operation Center. OVER.
NORTH RELAY: ROGER. My replacement has called and ready to take over my operations. His

call sign is W5$$$. I wish to CLOSE my station. OVER.


CALIFORNIA: Roger RELAY change. AFFIRMATIVE, you may CLOSE.

Thanks for your help. OVER.


NORTH RELAY: ROGER. THIS IS N6???. Station CLOSED. OUT.
CALIFORNIA: W6EMA. OUT.
Notice that every thing flows smoothly. There is no doubt who is talking, whose turn it is or that the contact is finished. It is also obvious that a station has gone off of the air.

EXERCISE ON PROWORDS - AFFIRMATIVE, NEGATIVE AND ROGER
The proword AFFIRMATIVE is used to say yes. NEGATIVE means no. They are distinctive sounding and their meaning is clear. The proword ROGER does not mean "yes" nor does it signify agreement.

It means I have received the last transmission and it is understood.


Example:
UNIT 1: UNIT too, THIS IS UNIT wun. OVER.
UNIT 2: THIS IS UNIT too. OVER.
UNIT 1: Are you ready to copy traffic. OVER.
UNIT 2: NEGATIVE. I have power problems. WAIT. OVER.
UNIT 1: ROGER. KC6???. OUT.
UNIT 2: K4!!!. OUT.
UNIT 2: UNIT wun, THIS IS UNIT too. OVER.
UNIT 1: THIS IS UNIT wun. Are you ready for my traffic

now. OVER.


UNIT 2: AFFIRMATIVE. OVER.
UNIT 1: ROGER. Traffic follows.

EXERCISE ON PROWORD - DRILL
One of the most difficult, as well as the most important, prowords to remember to use is DRILL. If not used during an exercise, actual panic could result. Our frequencies are monitored by many amateurs

and the media who, if unaware of an exercise, may take the received information as real emergency traffic and notify official agencies and even the public. This has happened. DRILL is used on the first and last line of the text portion of a piece of traffic. Both ‘DRILL’s are included in the group or word or check count (if used) along with the text.


The proword EXERCISE (or the word DRILL) should also be used to announce to anyone listening that the activities on the radio are, in fact, an exercise or drill and not the real thing. Remember that only one of the two stations may be heard by any one listener.
Example:
SANTA LUSIA MCP: This is an EXERCISE.
SANTA LUSIA MCP: CALIFORNIA, THIS IS SANTA LUSIA MCP. OVER.
CALIFORNIA: THIS IS CALIFORNIA. OVER.
SANTA LUSIA MCP: I have traffic for the ICP. OVER.
CALIFORNIA: Call your station. This is a DRILL. OVER.
SANTA LUSIA MCP: ROGER. N4??. OUT.
CALIFORNIA: W6EMA. OUT.

SANTA LUSIA MCP: FLOOD ICP, THIS IS SANTA LUSIA MCP. OVER.


FLOOD ICP: THIS IS FLOOD ICP. OVER.
SANTA LUSIA MCP: I have traffic for OPS. OVER.
FLOOD ICP: Send your traffic. OVER.
SANTA LUSIA MCP: ROGER, traffic follows.
BREAK.
DRILL.

The levee has broken and there is much damage.

More information to follow.

DRILL.
BREAK. OVER.
FLOOD ICP: I copy your traffic. OVER.
SANTA LUSIA MCP: ROGER. N4??. This is an EXERCISE. OUT.
FLOOD ICP: This is an EXERCISE. N6!!!. OUT.

SANTA LUSIA MCP: CALIFORNIA, THIS IS SANTA LUSIA MCP. OVER.


CALIFORNIA: THIS IS CALIFORNIA. OVER.

SANTA LUSIA MCP: I have completed my traffic. OVER.


CALIFORNIA: ROGER. This is a EXERCISE. OVER.
SANTA LUSIA MCP: This is an EXERCISE. N4??. OUT.
CALIFORNIA: W6EMA. OUT.

EXERCISE ON PROWORD - BREAK
BREAK is used just before and after the text of a piece of traffic or message. After saying BREAK, let up on the microphone key and listen for a few seconds. Give the receiving operator time to ask for fills of anything that may have been missed or

misunderstood.

Example: (Message text example)
From: IC
To: EOC
BREAK.
The dam has broken. A wall of water fo-wer zee-row feet high is heading to town at fife zee-row

miles per hour. You have wun fife minutes to evacuate.


BREAK.
Insure that everyone is evacuated to a line that is at least six zee-row feet above the river and away

from all buildings.


BREAK.

The first BREAK gives the receiving station time to get address corrections if required, from the sending station. The second BREAK is for corrections within the text.


When the text is long, the word BREAK is used every 25 groups to give the receiving station opportunity to get required corrections from the sending station before the first error can lead to others.

EXERCISE ON PROWORD - WAIT
The proword WAIT is used when an extra time is needed for something; the operator needs time to perform some other task, is trying to listen to some other conversation or just needs time to think. It is a request for the other station to just plain wait.
Example:
SOUTH RELAY: What is your location. OVER.
SANTA LUSIA MCP: On the north shore of the lake. OVER.
SOUTH RELAY: ROGER. CALIFORNIA has information for you. WAIT. K6???. OUT
SANTA LUSIA MCP: N6!!!. OUT.
SOUTH RELAY: CALIFORNIA THIS IS SOUTH RELAY. OVER.
CALIFORNIA: Go ahead SOUTH RELAY. OVER.
SOUTH RELAY: The SANTA LUSIA MCP's location is.......Sorry I forgot. WAIT. K6???. OUT.
SOUTH RELAY: SANTA LUSIA EOC, THIS IS SOUTH RELAY> SAY AGAIN your location.

OVER.


NOTE: SANTA LUSIA EOC was told to WAIT by SOUTH RELAY so when SOUTH RELAY

needed to speak to him again, the normal calling procedures did not have to be used. SANTA LUSIA EOC was and should be waiting for the call.



EXERCISE ON PROWORDS - CORRECT, CORRECTION AND WRONG
These are prowords which are used by either operator. They are used when the operator realizes that an error has just been made and it requires correction.
CORRECTION is used to correct an error. If the error is followed by a few other words then the operator is to go back to the error, correct it, then continue on even though the next few words are repeated. CORRECT is used to inform another operator that they have the information correct. WRONG is used when an operator notices that what another operator says is not correct.
Example:
DIVISION C: Go ahead with your traffic. OVER.
ICP: ROGER, traffic follows.
BREAK.
Your request for equipment has been filled. The se-ven tankers are on the
CORRECTION.
The wun se-ven strike teams are on the way. ETA tha-ree zee-roo minutes.
BREAK.
DIVISION C: Is that se-ven, strike teams in tha-ree zee-roo minutes. OVER.
ICP: WRONG. I SAY AGAIN, figures wun seven strile teams.OVER.
DIVISION C: ROGER. Wun se-ven. OVER.
ICP: CORRECT. WA5!!!. OUT.
DIVISION C: W6!!!. OUT.

EXERCISE ON PROWORDS - SAY AGAIN, ALL AFTER AND ALL BEFORE
These prowords are used when there have been problems with copying traffic due to poor conditions or misunderstanding what has been said. The example below will use the words together as they would normally be used in traffic handling. The sender as well as the receiver can use these prowords to insure accurate communications.
The proword SAY AGAIN is used when the receiver needs the sender to repeat all or part of a message. SAY AGAIN is also used when the sender wants to stress a word or phrase. ALL AFTER is

used to indicate that the operator requires a repeat of all the traffic after the last understood phrase/word. ALL BEFORE is used when the operator requires a repeat of a part of a piece of traffic just prior to the understood phrase/word.


Example:
RIVERTON: Go ahead with your traffic. OVER.
RED CROSS: ROGER, traffic follows.
BREAK.
The evacuation must be completed by wun se-ven zee-row zee-rowL. I will need an

Accurate count of evacuees as soon as possible after that time.


BREAK.
The route of the evacuation must be as follows. Your location south on Rocky Road to

the Gainsville Road intersection.


BREAK

Go west on Gainsville Road to Gainsville and the the high school gym in the center of

town. Start the evacuation immediately.
I SAY AGAIN, Start the evacuation immediately.

BREAK.
RIVERTON: SAY AGAIN, ALL AFTER "on" and ALL BEFORE "gym". OVER.


RED CROSS: AFFIRMATIVE, I SAY AGAIN ALL AFTER "on" and ALL BEFORE "gym". Gainsville

Road to Gainsville and the high school.


BREAK.
RIVERTON: ROGER. OVER.

EXERCISE ON PROWORD - SPELL
The proword SPELL is used to insure accuracy when an unusual or difficult word is used within a piece of traffic. The sender generally will use it automatically. The receiver can also request SPELL as they require. In both cases all words are spelled phonetically. First, you say the word, then say I SPELL,

then spell it phonetically, and lastly say the word again.


Example:
HAZMAT: TO IC.
BREAK.
It appears the spill was generated by the crash of a tractor trailer rig. The tractor is a

Kenworth, I SPELL, kilo-echo-november-whiskey-oscar-romeo-tango-hotel, Kenworth.

License FIGURE wun charlie too ate niner zee-row fife fower, California. The contents of

the trailer is wun zee-row tons of borax.


BREAK.
IC: SPELL last word. OVER.
HAZMAT: Last word is borax, I SPELL, bravo-oscar-romeo-alpha-x-ray, borax. OVER.
IC: Roger. OVER.
EXERCISE ON PROWORDS - FIGURES AND INITIALS
These prowords are used when the copy on a station is poor or when the information being sent is very important and there can be no possibility of an error. When any letter is contained within a FIGURES or INITIALS group they must be given phonetically.
The proword FIGURES precedes a number, a group of numbers, or a mixed group of numbers and letters which begins with a number. Remember, say each number separately not as a group.
Likewise, the proword INITIALS precedes a letter, a group of letters, or a mixed group of letters and numbers which begins with a letter. Remember, say each letter separately not as a group.
Example:
1. (single number)
I have FIGURES niner fire trucks en route.
2. (group of numbers) - There are FIGURES tharee zearo personnel.


  1. (mixed group beginning with a number) - The license number is FIGURES fiyuv-siks-sevven Alpha

Bravo Charlie, California.

The proword INITIALS precedes a letter, a group of letters, or a mixed group of letters and numbers which begins with a letter. Phonetics again!!


Example:
1. (single letter)- Go to the INITIALS Alpha Street bridge now.


2. (group of letters)- Log time in INITIALS Charlie Uniform Tango.


  1. (mixed group beginning with a letter)- The license number is INITIALS Alpha Bravo Charlie niner-

ate-sevven, California.

EXERCISE ON PROWORDS - RELAY, DIRECT, CALL SIGN AND UNKNOWN STATION
The proword RELAY is used when one station cannot hear another station and a go-between who can hear both is needed. DIRECT means a station can copy another station directly, no relay is required. CALL SIGN would be used by a station in the initial contact with another station preceding the second stations call sign. UNKNOWN STATION is used in place of a call sign that can not be understood.
Example:
CALIFORNIA: UNKNOWN STATION, UNKNOWN STATION, REPEAT your CALL SIGN. OVER.
UNIT 1: THIS IS UNIT ?, UNIT ?. OVER.
CALIFORNIA: UNKNOWN STATION, WAIT. OUT.
CALIFORNIA: I need a RELAY for the UNKNOWN STATION. OVER.
UNIT 2: CALIFORNIA, THIS IS UNIT 2. I can copy the UNKNOWN STATION as CALL SIGN

UNIT 1. Do you want me to RELAY. OVER.


CALIFORNIA: AFFIRMATIVE UNIT 2, please RELAY. Call your station. OVER.
UNIT 2: ROGER. KB7???. OUT.
CALIFORNIA: W6!!!. OUT.
UNIT 2: UNIT 1, THIS IS UNIT 2. OVER.
UNIT 1: THIS IS UNIT 2. ROGER. I wish to check into the net. OVER.
UNIT 2: ROGER. WAIT. KB7!!!. OUT.
UNIT 1: N7!!!. OUT.
UNIT 2: CALIFORNIA, THIS IS UNIT 2. OVER.
CALIFORNIA: THIS IS CALIFORNIA. I now copy DIRECT. OVER.
UNIT 2: ROGER. KB7???. OUT.
CALIFORNIA: W6EMA. OUT.
CALIFORNIA: UNIT 1, I show you checked in at 1330 hours. OVER.
UNIT 1: ROGER. OVER.
CALIFORNIA: ROGER. W6EMA. OUT.
UNIT 1: N7!!!. OUT.

EXERCISE ON PROWORD - MORE TO FOLLOW
The proword MORE TO FOLLOW is used to let the receiving station know that there is another piece of traffic to follow the one just sent and to be prepared to receive it. The receiving station will know that there is going to be another piece of traffic just as soon as the one just finished is acknowledged and to be ready for it.
Example:
Unit 10: TO: EOC.
BREAK.
The river has just washed out the bridge. The town is cut off from the easterly evacuation

route.
BREAK


MORE TO FOLLOW. OVER.
ICP: ROGER. GO AHEAD with traffic.
Unit 10: ROGER. Traffic follows.
TO OES.
BREAK.
Pieces of the bridge have hit the railroad trestle and caused severe damage. It is too weak to

hold a train. Warn the rail line and insure no railway traffic uses the trestle.


BREAK.
EXERCISE ON PROWORD - WORDS TWICE
The proword WORDS TWICE is used when copy is very poor. At the request of one operator the other operator will give each word or phrase twice. This will help insure that the traffic can get through.
Example:
DIVISION C: NEGATIVE copy. NEGATIVE copy. SAY AGAIN. SAY AGAIN. WORDS TWICE.

WORDS TWICE. OVER. OVER.
ICP: AFFIRMATIVE. AFFIRMATIVE.
BREAK. BREAK.
Requested resources have been dispatched. Requested resources have been

dispatched.


BREAK. BREAK.
OVER. OVER.
DIVISION C: ROGER. ROGER. W3???. W3???. OUT. OUT.
ICP: N6!!!. N6!!!. OUT. OUT.

EXERCISE ON PROWORD - LETTER THE TEXT
LETTER THE TEXT is the proword used as the last resort when there is an error in a piece of traffic that for some reason can't be found. It is very useful on very long pieces of traffic. It is giving the first letter of every word in the text phonetically. Phonetics are used because they are always the same and much more easily understood under very poor conditions, therefore also much faster than repeating the actual words in the text.
The above will only tell you where the word or words are missing, not what the missing word(s) are. For the exact word(s) the prowords SAY AGAIN, ALL AFTER and ALL BEFORE are required.
Example:
ICP: Go ahead with your traffic. OVER.
DIVISION A: ROGER. Traffic follows.
BREAK.
The fire is spreading very fast now. We are cut off in three directions. We need air

support immediately to insure the escape route stays open. There are three serious

injuries that require evacuation.
BREAK.

ICP: Poor copy on you. I missed some of your traffic. I don't know where. LETTER THE



TEXT. OVER.
DIVISION A: ROGER. I LETTER THE TEXT.
BREAK.
Tango Fox-trot India Sierra Victor Fox-trot November Whiskey Alpha Charlie Oscar

India Tango Delta Whiskey November Alpha Sierra India Tango India Tango Echo

Romeo Sierra Oscar Tango Alpha Tango Sierra India Tango Romeo Alpha Echo

Alpha.
BREAK.


ICP: ROGER. SAY AGAIN, ALL AFTER "support", and ALL

BEFORE "there". OVER.







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