University of bradford school of Engineering and Informatics



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UNIVERSITY OF BRADFORD
School of Engineering and Informatics
School of Media, Design and Technology
Programme title: BSc (Hons) Computer Animation and Visual Effects


Awarding and teaching institution:


University of Bradford

Final and interim awards:

BSc (Honours) [Framework for Higher Education Qualifications level 6]
Diploma of Higher Education [Framework for Higher Education Qualifications level 5]
Certificate of Higher Education [Framework for Higher Education Qualifications level 4]


Programme title:

Computer Animation and Visual Effects


Programme approved by:

n/a


Duration:

3 years full time; 4 years full-time including a year of study abroad and/or a work placement; 4 years part time intensive; 6 years part time.


UCAS code:

G443 – 3 Year; I700 – 4 Year BSc/CAVFX


Subject benchmark statement:

Computing; Art and Design; Communication, Media, Film and Cultural Studies


Date produced:

May 2002

Last updated :

October 2013

Introduction


Even in difficult economic times, creative industries are growing in the UK and internationally. As animation technology is capable of producing ever more spectacular output, the operators using the technology must be equipped with the skills and ideas to get the most from it. Graduates who can demonstrate strong creative and technical aptitude and a critical understanding of the workings of the industry are very much in demand. Studying hard on a degree here will equip you for a rewarding career.

The School of Media, Design and Technology is part of Bradford University’s School of Engineering and Informatics (SEI), and it offers cutting edge undergraduate and postgraduate degree programmes in the fields of computer animation and computer games development. These are delivered against a background of internationally recognised research in computer animation, virtual reality, distributed virtual environments, visualization, imaging, multimedia, digital video, human computer interaction, artificial intelligence and more. Our programmes are unique in that they are offered in collaboration with the National Media Museum (NMeM), giving you access to an additional wealth of resources and expertise.

The School is a partner of Creative Skillset, the sector skills council for the creative industries, which is an acknowledgement of its clear links to industry and indicates the relevance of its programmes for employment in the media sector. Our other partners include the BBC, the NMeM and Bradford UNESCO City of Film. Employability is one of our key values, and many of our graduates go on to exciting jobs in the animation and visual effects, games, interactive and wider new media industries, regularly winning national and international awards for their work. While our programmes provide you with specific sets of practical production skills, they also enhance your overall employability through their extensive use of team-working and problem-solving approaches to learning.

Programme Aims


The programme is intended to:

Equip students who wish to develop expertise in the creative, aesthetic and technical aspects of computer-generated animation and visual effects, supported by a range of relevant audio-visual media disciplines.

On this programme you will develop your creative skills through study of the basics of 3D and 2D computer animation, observational drawing, image production and manipulation, television and audio production, putting all these elements into practice through project modules. While the main emphasis is on content creation (helping you to produce a strong portfolio of work on graduation), the programme also provides you with an appreciation of the social, aesthetic, and business contexts within which media artefacts are produced and circulated.

The School aims to provide Honours degree programmes which enable you to develop an integrated range of knowledge, understanding and skills in the field of computer animation through critical engagement with principles, applications, content design and production practice. In addition, the programmes aim actively to encourage you to develop a portfolio of appropriate transferable skills and attributes. For the Computer Animation and Visual Effects programme, these aims are achieved by:



  • delivering a programme of study with some opportunities for shared learning with other programmes offered by the School, with increasing specialization as you move towards graduation. The final year of the programme focuses mainly on project production, allowing you to integrate the skills and knowledge developed in the first two years of the programme;

  • providing a supportive, structured environment in which you are encouraged to develop independent learning skills;

  • developing subject knowledge and understanding, developing discipline skills and personal transferable skills, enabling graduates to pursue programmes of further study, or to move directly into responsible employment.

Programme Learning Outcomes


When you have completed the programme you will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the development and scope of forms of production and distribution, a flexible familiarity with the generic attributes of applications software, awareness of the conventions within which media artefacts are produced and read, and a well-developed set of creative, problem solving, and team working skills.

  2. Comprehend and critique the social, political, cultural, technical, and business conditions of computer game production and reception in national and international contexts

  3. Demonstrate knowledge of and competence in major software applications packages, with particular reference to 2D and 3D computer animation and compositing; knowledge and understanding of the use of computer animation and visual effects for film and video post-production.

  4. Develop knowledge and practical understanding of the use of interactive media products.

  5. Apply the awareness of the concepts surrounding sustainability to the varied disciplines of animation production.

  6. Demonstrate competence in content specification, design, production, marketing and evaluation in the context of 2D, 3D, linear and non-linear media, with particular emphasis on computer animation and visual effects.

  7. Critically compare and contrast production packages and processes across a range of media forms.

  8. Demonstrate the ability to coherently combine and integrate a number of different data and media types, and to make informed judgements in the context of rapidly developing and converging media industries.

  9. Analyse and interpret aural, visual, and audio-visual material.

  10. Exercises significant judgement of the design and development processes in interactive multimedia, have a thorough appreciation of the software and hardware technologies of interactive multimedia systems.

  11. Exercise the ability to apply, in practice, current principles and techniques for computer animation and visual effects and be able to evaluate critically the relative efficiency of different approaches to computer animation and visual effects problem solving.

  12. Command practical skills in data management & presentation, interpretation of information, IT and communication skills, and demonstrate experience of creative and systematic problem solving through reflective and enquiring learning. This includes teamwork and leadership, effective project management and personal management.

  13. Evaluate the social and environmental impact of your actions, and use of technology, both as an individual and as part of a media or computing related organisation.

On completion of this award at Certificate of Higher Education Level, you will be able to:



  1. Demonstrate a core underpinning knowledge related to computer animation and visual effects;

  2. Describe and apply the fundamental principles and techniques of computer animation and visual effects;

  3. Describe a range of widely used computing applications in the field including features of and limitations on their use;

  4. Demonstrate an understanding of, and ability to apply, fundamental concepts, principles and theories underpinning computer animation and visual effects to straightforward situations with defined requirements;

  5. Collect, organise and present different data types using appropriate techniques in specific areas;

  6. Demonstrate and apply basic knowledge of the principles of research design, and data collection and skills, to support design;

  7. Work effectively as individuals and in groups. Use personal skills to communicate effectively in a range of situations;

  8. Communicate accurately and reliably with a range of audiences using basic theories and concepts of the subjects of study.

On completion of this award at Diploma of Higher Education Level, you will be able to:



  1. Apply knowledge and skills in computer animation and visual effects to the analysis of complex applications and production issues;

  2. Apply knowledge of investigative and research principles to demonstrate an understanding of how to evaluate designs, processes and products;

  3. Apply knowledge of relevant software to problems and systems;

  4. Apply knowledge of techniques and theory of image manipulation and processing to the assessment and management of specific creative challenges;

  5. Demonstrate the use of practical computing skills in the production of computer graphics, animation, models, and interactive applications drawing on a range of professional skills in the development of these objects;

  6. Use personal and technical skills to communicate effectively within computing environments with other professionals.

Although the University does not recruit directly to Ordinary degrees this route is available to students. A Bachelor’s degree (Ordinary) is awarded to students who have demonstrated:



  • a systematic understanding key aspects of their field of study, including acquisition of coherent and detailed knowledge informed by aspects of computer animation and visual effects.

  • an ability to deploy accurately established techniques of analysis and enquiry within computer animation and visual effects.

  • conceptual understanding that enables the student:

    • to devise and sustain arguments, and/or to solve problems, using ideas and techniques.

    • to describe and comment upon particular aspects of current research, or equivalent scholarship, or practice in computer animation and visual effects.

  • an appreciation of the uncertainty, ambiguity and limits of knowledge.

  • the ability to manage their own learning, and to make use of primary sources.

Typically, holders of the qualification will be able to:

  • apply the methods and techniques that they have learned to review, consolidate, extend and apply their knowledge and understanding.

  • communicate information, ideas, problems and solutions to both specialist and non specialist audiences.

And holders will have:

  • the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring:

    • the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility

    • the learning ability needed to undertake appropriate further training of a professional or equivalent nature.

Curriculum


The map of your studies is detailed further below showing core (C) and optional (O) modules. Each year, or stage, of an Honours programme comprises 2 semesters with 60 credits being studied in each semester.

It is also possible to study on this programme on a part time basis over 6 years, with 60 credits per semester being taken.

Ordinary degrees comprise 100 credits at each stage of the programme.

Stage 1 [FHEQ Level 4]


By the end of this stage, you will have acquired a broad knowledge base of fundamental technical, practical and theoretical concepts and will be able to apply them to your work. Major subjects include the foundation skills associated with 3D modelling and animation, observational drawing as well as the development of professional skills.

Modules are equally divided into technical focus and theoretical focus, with an additional emphasis on core elements such as visual literacy skills and knowledge of the background and history of computer animation.



Module Code

Module Title

Type

Credits

Level

Study period

EM0139D

Introduction to 3D Computer Animation

C

20

4

1

EM0149L

Observational Drawing

C

20

4

1+2

EM0106D

Visual Literacy and Imaging

C

20

4

1

EM0151L

Creative Industries - Foundations

C

20

4

1+2

EM0128D

Conventions of Animation

C

20

4

2

EM0140D

3D Character Modelling and Animation

C

20

4

2

Students who have achieved at least 120 credit points at Level 4 may exit the programme and are eligible for the award of Certificate of Higher Education.

Stage 2 [FHEQ Level 5]


By the end of this stage, you will be able to analyse and evaluate information on the subject of animation and the global animation industry and will be able to relate this information to your own work. Major subjects include the continuation of skill-building in core practical and technical areas, taking skills further into Script programming and group development projects, as well as in computer generated visual effects.

Modules continue to build on the core skills of 3D graphics and programming, as well as underpinning this development practice with an industry focus. Optional modules such as motion capture or facial modelling and animation are also available to build particular skill sets based on future carrier paths. Students are given the opportunity to choose their own option, if this is not taken however Motion Capture is the default option for stage 2.




Module Code

Module Title

Hons

Ord


Credits

Level

Sem

EM0264D

Advanced Character Animation

C

C

20

5

1

EM0216D

Script Programming and Technical Animation

C

C

20

5

1

EM0280D

Animation Appreciation and Analysis

C

C

20

5

1

EM0274D

CGI Lighting, Rendering & Look Development

C

C

20

5

2

EM0242D

Computer Generated Visual Effects

C

C

20

5

2

EM0353D

Option: Effects Animation and Dynamics for VFX

O

-

20

6

2

EM0253D

Option: Facial Modelling/Animation

O

-

20

5

2

EM0366D

Option: Motion Capture

O

-

20

6

2

EM0122D

Option: Conventions of Videography

O

-

20

4

2

Students who have achieved at least 120 credit points at Level 5 may exit the programme and are eligible for the award of Diploma of Higher Education.

Stage 3 [FHEQ Level 6]


By the end of this stage, students will be able to critically review, consolidate and extend a considerable specialist knowledge in animation and visual effects, and demonstrate the successful application of this to their own research-based and self directed projects.

Major emphasis is placed on industry facing projects and project management where students are able to create a portfolio of individual and group work with a personal specialisation. Students are given the opportunity to choose their own options, if this is not taken however Individual Specialisation and Effects Animation and Dynamics for VFX are the default options for stage 3.



Module Code

Module Title

Hons

Ordinary


Credits

Level

Sem

EM0333K

Design For Industry

C

C

20+20

6

1+2

EM0324D

Individual Project 1

C

C

20

6

1

EM0337D

Option: Specialisation

O

O

20

6

1

CM0341Q

Option: Final Year Project (Undergraduate Ambassadors Scheme)

O

-

20+20

6

1+2

EM0328D

Individual Project 2

C

C

20

6

2

EM0353D

Option: Effects Animation and Dynamics for VFX

O

O

20

6

2

EM0253D

Option: Facial Modelling/Animation

O

O

20

5

2

EM0366D

Option: Motion Capture

O

O

20

6

2

The curriculum may change, subject to the University's programme approval, monitoring and review procedures.

Part Time Intensive

Programme arrangements for the part time intensive programme, which is taught over 4 years:

Year 1


By the end of this stage, you will have acquired a broad knowledge base of fundamental technical, practical and theoretical concepts and will be able to apply them to your work. Major subjects include the foundation skills associated with 3D modelling and animation, observational drawing as well as the development of professional skills.

Modules are equally divided into technical focus and theoretical focus, with an additional emphasis on core elements such as the background and history of computer animation.



Module Code

Module Title

Type

Credits

Level

Study period

EM0139D

Introduction to 3D Computer Animation

C

20

4

1

EM0149L

Observational Drawing

C

20

4

1+2

EM0151L

Creative Industries - Foundations

C

20

4

1+2

EM0128D

Conventions of Animation

C

20

4

2





Year 2


By the end of this stage, you will be able to analyse and evaluate information on the subject of animation and the global animation industry and will be able to relate this information to your own work.

Modules continue to build on the core skills of 3D graphics and programming, as well as underpinning this development practice with an industry focus.



Module Code

Module Title

Type

Credits

Level

Study period

EM0106D

Visual Literacy and Imaging

C

20

4

1

EM0140D

3D Character Modelling and Animation

C

20

4

2

EM0280D

Animation Appreciation and Analysis

C

20

5

1

EM0274D

CGI Lighting, Rendering & Look Development

C

20

5

2

Year 3


Major subjects include the continuation of skill-building in core practical and technical areas, taking skills further into Script programming and group development projects, as well as in computer generated visual effects. Optional modules such as motion capture or facial modelling and animation are also available to build particular skill sets based on future carrier paths.


Module Code

Module Title

Type

Credits

Level

Study period

EM0264D

Advanced Character Animation

C

20

5

1

EM0216D

Script Programming and Technical Animation

C

20

5

1

EM0242D

Computer Generated Visual Effects

C

20

5

2

EM0353D

Option: Effects Animation and Dynamics for VFX

O

20

6

2

EM0253D

Option: Facial Modelling/Animation

O

20

5

2

EM0366D

Option: Motion Capture

O

20

6

2

EM0122D

Option: Conventions of Videography

O

20

4

1

Year 4


By the end of this stage, you will be able to critically review, consolidate and extend a considerable specialist knowledge in animation and visual effects, and demonstrate the successful application of this to your own research-based and self directed projects.

Major emphasis is placed on industry facing projects and project management where students are able to create a portfolio of individual and group work with a personal specialisation.




Module Code

Module Title

Type

Credits

Level

Study period

EM0333K

Design For Industry

C

20+20

6

1+2

EM0337D

Specialisation

C

20

6

1

EM0353D

Option: Effects Animation and Dynamics for VFX

O

20

3

2

EM0253D

Option: Facial Modelling/Animation

O

20

5

2

EM0366D

Option: Motion Capture

O

20

6

2

Summer period

Module Code

Module Title

Type

Credits

Level

Study period

EM0324D

Individual Project 1

C

20

6

Sum

EM0328D

Individual Project 2

C

20

6

Sum

Students who have achieved at least 120 credit points at Level 4 may exit the programme and are eligible for the award of Certificate of Higher Education.

Students who have achieved at least 120 credit points at Level 5 may exit the programme and are eligible for the award of Diploma of Higher Education.

The curriculum may change, subject to the University's programme approval, monitoring and review procedures.

Study abroad and work placement opportunities

You have the option to undertake an industrial placement, or of studying or working abroad for a year between stages 2 and 3; this option is strongly encouraged. The School has an industrial training co-ordinator who has contacts with a large number of outside organisations and who assists in helping you find a placement. The University’s International Office provides a wide range of opportunities and support for students to gain international experience. Both options provide the opportunity to gain valuable experience, and are viewed favourably by prospective employers.


Teaching and Assessment Strategies


You will experience a wide range of teaching and learning environments. Concepts, principles and theories are generally explored in formal lectures, discussed and debated in associated tutorials and seminars, and demonstrated in laboratory classes. Practical skills are developed in studio, laboratory, and workshop sessions, taking advantage of the University’s, and its partners’, extensive software and hardware provision. Professional, personal, and presentational skills are developed through discussion and small-scale project work which involves problem solving and design exercises. These are often tackled through collaborative learning in small groups supported by members of academic staff. Larger–scale project work is used to bring various aspects of your programme together. A particular strength of this programme is the contribution made to the teaching programme by successful practising animation professionals.

Each 20-credit module on the programme requires you to commit 200 hours of study. Some of these hours will be formally timetabled - lectures, laboratories, seminars, tutorials and workshops – and others will involve you in carrying out private study. The balance between these forms of study changes as you pass through the three years of the programme. There are a lot of “contact hours” (time spent with tutors) in the earlier stages of the programme; the final year is mostly project based, and at this stage you will be expected to manage your own learning, under the general guidance of your tutors.

Basic principles and concepts are addressed in the first year (Stage One) of your studies. In the second year (Stage Two) a more analytical approach is taken, and in the final year (Stage Three) you will have the opportunity to synthesise and critically review the knowledge, understanding, and skills you have gained throughout the programme. You will also have the opportunity to shape elements of your own learning experience, by selecting optional and elective modules, and defining your own project briefs.

Methods of assessment are similarly varied and your progress will be assessed using a mix of formal examinations, presentations and seminar papers, reports, laboratory tests, essays, coursework assignments, and projects. The appropriate method is chosen so that you may demonstrate the particular learning outcomes of each module.



Education for Sustainable Development (ESD)

Sustainable media and computing are highly relevant areas to the programme, so we include taught content around sustainable themes and the opportunity to explore and express these in project-based and written work.  Students have considerable flexibility in individual and group project directions, which would allow them to explore ESD themes further if they show interest. They are encouraged to become involved in the production of media for the University’s ‘Ecoversity’ initiative, either as part of project work or as extra-curricular projects.

There are numerous opportunities for group work throughout the years (especially level 5 and 6) in which students learn to resolve conflict and work collaboratively to achieve shared goals. 

Assessment Regulations


This Programme conforms to the standard University Assessment Regulations which are available at the following link: http://www.bradford.ac.uk/aqpo/ordinances-and-regulations/

Admission Requirements


The University welcomes applications from all potential students regardless of their previous academic experience; offers are made following detailed consideration of each individual application. Most important in the decision to offer a place is our assessment of a candidate’s potential to benefit from their studies and of their ability to succeed on this particular programme. Entrance requirements for each programme will vary but consideration of your application will be based on a combination of your formal academic qualifications and other relevant experience.

If you have prior certificated learning or professional experience which may be equivalent to parts of this programme, the University has procedures to evaluate this learning in order to provide you with exemptions from specified modules contained within the curriculum. Please talk to us if you do not fit the standard pattern of entry qualifications.

The University of Bradford has always welcomed applications from disabled students, and these will be considered on the same academic grounds as are applied to all applicants. If you have some form of disability you may wish to contact the programme leader before you apply.

Offers are made following detailed consideration of each application, and an individual interview with departmental teaching staff. Most important in the decision to offer a place is our assessment of a candidate’s potential to benefit from their studies and of their ability to succeed on this particular programme. Entrance requirements will vary but are set after consideration of each applicant’s academic background and achievements and all other relevant experience. A typical offer to someone seeking entry through the UCAS scheme would be 280 points. Applications are welcome from candidates with non-standard qualifications or who, lacking academic qualifications, have significant relevant experience.



Entry requirements: Typical offer (UCAS tariff points): 280

  • To include 160 points from 2 GCE A levels or equivalent. No specific subject requirements, although subjects related to course content will be an advantage. Or DMM in a relevant BTEC Diploma. International Baccalaureate (see UCAS tariff point requirements).

  • GCSE English and Maths minimum grade C

  • Minimum IELTS at 6.0 or the equivalent

You may be permitted to transfer to one of the School’s other BA/BSc programmes at the end of the first semester of Stage One and, exceptionally, to selected programmes at the end of semester two, Stage One.

Learning Resources


The JB Priestley Library on the city campus and our specialist library in the School of Management provide a wide range of printed and electronic resources to support your studies. We offer quiet study space if you want to work on your own, and group study areas for the times when you need to discuss work with fellow students. Subject librarians for each School provide training sessions and individual guidance in finding the information you need for your assignment, and will help you organise your references properly.

Student PC clusters can be found in all our libraries and elsewhere on the campus. Many of these are open 24/7. You can also use the University's wireless network to access the internet from your own laptop. Most of our online journals are available on the internet (both on and off campus), and you can also access your University email account, personal information and programme-related materials this way.

Staff are on hand during the daytime to help you if you get stuck, and there is a 24/7 IT helpline available.

The programme is supported by laboratories with up to date hardware and software with regular update and replacement cycles (the programme’s major software package, Autodesk’s Maya, is updated frequently). Additionally, students have access to broadcast TV, chromakey and photographic studios, motion capture facilities, digital video editing and production suites, sound studio facilities and a loans counter where audio visual equipment (e.g. still and video cameras, lights, microphones etc.) can be reserved and loaned free of charge. Some elements of the programme are delivered by staff at the NMeM, giving you access to their world-class resources.


Student Support and Guidance


All students are admitted to the School of Media, Design & Technology through a process of induction that includes detailed talks by the Dean and Head of School.

Afterwards, ongoing support for students is provided in the form of one-stop facilities located at the School of Engineering and Informatics Student Support Office (SSO) in Horton Building open throughout the day during term, and in the mornings and afternoons outside term.



Programme Team

Support for you personally and in your programme of study, will be provided both by the University and the Programme Team. You will be allocated a personal tutor who is someone with whom you will be able to talk about any academic or personal concerns. The School will ensure that there is someone available with whom you feel comfortable to help and support you. You will be provided with a comprehensive series of handbooks that you can consult on a range of learning issues and your programme tutors will be available to consult on subject specific queries.

Support for registered students also is provided 24/7 via the School of Media, Design and Technology intranet. This includes the SSO website at http://www.inf.brad.ac.uk/internal/sso/ (this requires a username and password when accessed externally) with information on:


  • Student Handbook

  • Programme Timetable

  • Examination timetable

  • Answers to Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

  • Coursework submission record

  • E-mail Archives

The School’s intranet and website also offers information to support students, including:

  • Student Staff Liaison Minutes

  • Programmes and modules

  • Programme Tutors contact information

Finally, the School’s intranet includes the Technical Support website at http://ts.inf.brad.ac.uk/ which supports students by offering detailed information on all the technical and services offered by the School, including:

  • Digital Arts Centre

  • Equipment Loans Service

  • IT suites

  • Video Editing

  • Hosting

All students on this programme will be allocated a personal tutor who provides support and guidance on matters relating to learning, teaching, and student’s academic progress, pastoral support and personal development planning (PDP). There are tutors in the School who deal with issues where other social factors (relating to gender or disability for example) may have an impact on a student’s academic performance. The Student Staff Liaison Committee gives the opportunity for students to give formal feedback to the Programme Tutor and/or School about curricular issues and the general running of the programme.

The School also uses the University’s Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) Blackboard to support students via their individual modules.

The University provides important facilities such as extended access to the J.B. Priestley Library and Computing facilities, a Learner Development Unit, counselling and welfare services and careers advice. The University’s Disabilities Office encourages prospective students to visit before applying to the University so that you can see for yourself what facilities and support are available. You can also discuss any concerns you may have about your individual needs, whether these relate to study, personal care or other issues.

The Hub, Student Support Centre

The Hub, Student Support Centre provides a central reception where students can receive information, advice and guidance on a whole range of topics about their life at University. The Hub is located in the Richmond Building adjacent to the Atrium. 

The teams located within The Hub:


  • Accommodation

  • Admissions

    • Education Liaison

    • Enquiries

  • Student Administration and Support

    • Bursaries and Financial Support

    • Finance and Credit Control Group

    • Payzone

    • Records and Tuition Fees

  • International Office

  • Customer Service Team

www.brad.ac.uk/hub
+44 1274 232233

Students’ Union

We value the feedback provided by students and collaborate with the Students’ Union, through a system of programme representatives and formal staff student liaison committees, so that any issues you wish to raise are addressed rapidly.

The Students’ Union and the University of Bradford work in partnership to provide confidential counselling and welfare services where you can get help with any aspect of your personal or academic life. Student Financial and Information Services (based in the Hub) will provide you with information about a diverse range of issues such as council tax, personal safety and tourist information. International Students can access a range of additional advice and support services through the Student’s Union.

Employability and Career Development

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance their employability profile and capabilities through learning opportunities embedded within the curriculum.

Furthermore, the University is committed to supporting students to develop their commitment towards a career pathway(s) and to implementing a career plan. Professional career guidance and development support is available throughout your time as a student and as a graduate from Career Development Services. The support available from Career Development Services includes a wide range of information resources, one to one appointments, a weekly workshop programme, a mentoring programme, graduate recruitment and careers fairs, plus information and help to you find part time work, summer work placements, graduate internship programmes and graduate entry vacancies. In addition, some students as part of their programme of study may have the opportunity to complete a Career & Personal Development accredited module delivered by the Career Development Service.

All students are encouraged to access Career Development Services at an early stage during their studies and to use the extensive resources available on their web site www.careers.brad.ac.uk.

Career Development Services annually undertakes a survey of all graduates to find out their destination six months after graduation. The survey gathers data on the employment and further study routes graduates have entered and a range of other information including job roles, name and location of employers, salary details etc. The survey findings for each programme of study are presented on the programme information pages on the University website and via Career Development Services’ website www.careers.brad.ac.uk

Students are given the opportunity to form networks with industry personnel and to gain feedback on portfolios and skills via our attendance and participation in The Bradford Animation Festival and our attendance at national network events.

We also have given students the opportunity to take part in industry focus testing and one-off QA events, enabling them to add valuable industry experience to their profiles.

Learner Development Unit for Academic Skills Advice

For undergraduate students who are looking to improve their marks during their time at university, study skills and maths advice is available to all regardless of degree discipline or level of study. Students can access a programme of interactive workshops and clinics which is delivered throughout the year. This is in addition to our extremely popular face-to-face guidance from our advisers, who also offer a wide range of online and paper based materials for self-study.

http://www.bradford.ac.uk/academic-skills

Disability

Disabled students will find a supportive environment at Bradford where we are committed to ensuring that all aspects of student life are accessible to everyone.  The Disability Service can help by providing support, advice and equipment to help you get the most out of your time at Bradford. It is a place where you can discuss any concerns you may have about adjustments that you may need, whether these relate to study, personal care or other issues.    For more information contact the Disability Service by phoning: 01274 233739 or via email: disabilities@bradford.ac.uk


University policies and initiatives


Learning and Teaching

Our University approach to learning, teaching and assessment is encapsulated by an integrated set of themes and principles within our Curriculum Framework. All of our degree programmes have been designed to provide you with an inclusive and engaging learning environment which gives you the opportunity to thrive and develop in your area of study. Our research-informed programmes have a particular focus on developing your employability. We also place a strong emphasis on collaborative, real-world and enquiry-based learning, supported by appropriate learning technologies. Our assessment is designed not just to measure your achievement, but also to shape and guide your learning through preparing you for the increasing level of challenge as you progress through your degree. Together, these lead to you developing a distinctive set of graduate attributes which will prepare you for life beyond university.



Ecoversity:

Ecoversity is a strategic project of the University which aims to embed the principles of sustainable development into our decision-making, learning and teaching, research activities campus operations and lives of our staff and students. We do not claim to be a beacon for sustainable development but we aspire to become a leading University in this area. The facilities we create for teaching and learning, including teaching spaces, laboratories, IT labs and social spaces, will increasingly reflect our commitments to sustainable development. Staff and student participation in this initiative is crucial to its success and its inclusion in the programme specification is a clear signal that it is at the forefront of our thinking in programme development, delivery, monitoring and review. For more details see www.bradford.ac.uk/ecoversity

Further Information:


For further information, please check the University prospectus or contact Admissions.

The Admissions Office

The University of Bradford

Richmond Road

Bradford, BD7 1DP

UK


The Recruitment and Marketing Office

School of Engineering and Informatics

The University of Bradford

Horton Building

Richmond Road

Bradford, BD7 1DP

UK


+44 (0)1274 233054

http://www.brad.ac.uk/courses/



+44 (0)1274 235963

ugadmissions@scim.brad.ac.uk

http://scim.brad.ac.uk/courses/ug/


The contents of this programme specification may change, subject to the University's regulations and course approval, monitoring and review procedures.


© University of Bradford





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