Thesis guide graduate College Spring 2015 table of contents



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THESIS GUIDE


Graduate College


Spring 2015

black wordmark with carrington

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction 1


Form 2

Order 2


Manuscript Option 2

Title Page 3

Copyright Page 3

Abstract 4

Acceptance/Signature Page 6

Acknowledgements/Dedication 7

Table of Contents 7
Formatting the Text 8

Paper 8


Print Size and Font 8

Margins 8

Page Numbering 9

Paragraphs 10

Spacing 10

Abbreviations 10

Headings 11

Citation of Literature 12

Figures, Tables, Illustrations, and Appendices 13
Style Guides 19
Thesis Review and Submission 21

Research Involving Humans or Animals 21

Graduate College Review 22

Final Copies 24

Binding 26

Z Grade Form 26

Application for Graduation 26

Comprehensive Exam Report 27


Student Checklist 28
Preliminary Thesis Pages - Examples 30

INTRODUCTION
A thesis is to be prepared according to the specifications and standards of the Graduate College (this Thesis Guide) and those approved by the faculty of your program of study (style guide or journal formatting). Follow this Thesis Guide for all formatting details that are specified; where formatting details are not specified by this Thesis Guide, follow your department’s designated style guide or journal format. This Thesis Guide is organized and formatted (in most respects) as a thesis should be, to serve as a model.

A checklist is provided on pages 28-29 to assist you with verifying that guidelines have been followed. You MUST complete this checklist and submit it to the Graduate College with your thesis. After the checklist are nine pages modeling the content, arrangement, and format for the beginning of a thesis. It is highly recommended that students open another copy of this Word document, delete all the pages prior to the model title page, and start your thesis with the remaining document. This will eliminate many of the formatting issues that you would otherwise have to do yourself.



FORM
Order

The thesis will contain the following components in the order given:

1. Title Page

2. Copyright Notice (if desired)

3. Abstract

4. Acceptance/Signature Page

5. Acknowledgements (if any, and Dedication, if desired)

6. Table of Contents

7. List of Tables (if any)

8. List of Figures (if any)

9. Body of Thesis

10. Literature Cited/References

11. Appendices (if any)
Manuscript Option

An alternative to the standard sequence of sections in the body of the thesis, for students who intend to submit parts of their thesis to two or more professional journals, is the “manuscript option.” To use this option, see the appropriate supplement to the Thesis Guide on the Graduate College website (http://graduate.missouristate.edu).



Title Page

The title will often be referenced alone and thus should command the reader’s attention and be descriptive of the research. Keep the title to a few important words; a maximum of ten words is often a good goal. The title and author entries are centered within the margins of the title page. The title, in all upper case and bolded lettering, is double spaced and presented in an inverted pyramid style if longer than 48 characters. Verify correct spelling of the title. Many spell-check programs do not automatically check words that are in all upper case. Note that the name of the degree is requested, not the option/emphasis area within the degree. If you are unsure of your program, check the list of programs on our website (http://graduate.missouristate.edu/GradProgramList.htm). To ensure proper vertical spacing on this page, adjust the blocks of information so that the third block starts 50% down the page and the last block starts 75% down the page. This page is counted as “i” but pagination is not shown. The required format is shown on I at the back of this Thesis Guide.



Copyright Page

A thesis is eligible for copyright protection. However, the extent of ownership of the research and data embodied in a thesis is subject to considerable variation and a copyright page is not required. Source of funding (e.g., federal grants, contracts) that supported the project may be one factor influencing ownership. Mutual agreement on ownership should come from discussions with your thesis advisor. It is most desirable that discussions concerning ownership occur early in the research process.

One means to obtain copyright protection, if you wish to do so, is to insert a “Copyright Page” following the title page of the thesis. Nothing else should be on this page except for the page number which would be “ii.” The following information is placed at the bottom of the page. The only acceptable format choices that can be used are:

Copyright 2012 by [Insert your full legal name]

or

© 2012, [Insert your full legal name]


Since issues dealing with copyright are legal and subject to changes in federal law, additional information can be obtained from the Library of Congress, Registrar of Copyrighting, Washington, D.C. 20559. Phone: (202) 707-9100 for forms; (202) 707-5959 for general information. Registration of copyright is optional but will establish a public record of your thesis. For more information on copyright and registration, please see the following on-line document: “Copyright Law and Graduate Research” at http://www.il.proquest.com/hp/Support/DServices/copyright/index.html
Abstract

The abstract is to be limited to one page and should be confined to one paragraph. The body of the abstract should be single spaced. The required format is shown on page iii (example Thesis pages begin on p. 30, which is un-numbered as it would be in an actual thesis). Verify correct spelling of the title. Many spell-check programs do not check words that are all upper case.

Writing an informative and effective abstract takes extensive scrutiny of the research and numerous written drafts. Not only must you include key elements, but you also must select the most salient findings to communicate. Remember, however, that an effective abstract gives information about the quality of the research, as well as the investigator.

Begin with the purpose, specific objective, or hypothesis of the study. Why did you undertake the study? Space does not permit you to include an abundance of supporting rationale which would only obscure the sharp focus necessary in an abstract. Use one or two sentences that focus the research on a specific problem or situation. Proceed by describing the primary methods or approach used to achieve the objective. Emphasize materials and procedures needed to understand the outcome of the work. Include factors such as sample size, replications, conditions, and specialized techniques that make the results credible. At this point, the major writing challenge begins—the work of summarizing results. What is it you need others to know? It is unacceptable to state: “The results will be discussed.” Summarize the research results by pointing out the most salient findings. To the extent possible, use specific data rather than generalizations. Connect these results to their source in terms of experimental design or procedure and indicate statistical significance, as appropriate.

Culminate the abstract by stating conclusions or potential ramifications of the findings. Do the data support your original hypothesis or answer original questions? If possible, extrapolate the information obtained in the study to a broader generalization, but take care not to suggest claims beyond the data collected. The interpretation made in the conclusions should link to the opening statement of objective or purpose of the study. You have now stated what you did, what you found, and what it means.

Below the abstract, include a line which contains at least 5 keywords. These terms will be used to assist with cataloguing your thesis, so they should be descriptive. This allows readers with an interest in your topic to locate your document. Please verify that these keywords are spelled correctly and are the most appropriate to highlight your work. The block of text for signatures should start at mid-page for each line (directly above the page number).


Acceptance/Signature Page

Signatures on this page show acceptance of the thesis by the Graduate Faculty Thesis Committee and the Graduate College. Graduate faculty approval indicates that the thesis is an accurate presentation of research conducted by the student in the style and form appropriate in the area of study, and it is well written following proper thesis formatting and worthy of publication as a Missouri State University thesis.

The format for this page must follow that seen on page iv. Verify correct spelling of the title. Many spell-check programs do not check words that are all upper case. Verify that it is the same exact title that is on the title and abstract pages. All names/titles must be typed below the appropriate signature line on one line. The block of text for signatures should start at mid-page for each line (directly above the page number).


Acknowledgements/Dedication

If desired, a page can be inserted for the purpose of acknowledging the assistance and support of others. A “dedication” can be included, but serves a separate purpose. If used, it should be a separate paragraph with no subheading, generally starting with “I dedicate this thesis to…”. It may be separated from the rest of the acknowledgement by a blank line. Single spacing of these paragraphs is acceptable if necessary to keep this all on one page.


Table of Contents

The format of the Table of Contents should follow that shown in this document and modeled on page vi. (Note that the examples of headings on page vi are merely examples, not required chapter names.) Do not include in the Table of Contents those preliminary pages that use roman numerals for page numbers; start with the first chapter of the body of the thesis. Please verify that the page numbers line up along the right margin. For instructions on how to do this, see the appropriate supplement to the Thesis Guide on the Graduate College website (http://graduate.missouristate.edu). The heading names in the Table of Contents must match the heading names in the body of the thesis. Primary headings in the Table of Contents should not be indented, secondary headings should be indented ½” once (if used), and tertiary headings should be indented ½” twice (if used). Even if used in the text, tertiary (or subsequent) headings do not need to be included in the Table of Contents, but this must be consistent throughout the document.


FORMATTING THE TEXT
Paper

The thesis is printed on standard 8.5 X 11 inch paper with the final copies on 100% cotton-fiber bond white paper (Max wt = 24lbs). This paper contains lower amounts of acid fiber, is less subject to yellowing with age, and generally blocks print from the following page showing through. Any other paper such as Xerox, recycled, or erasable bond is not acceptable for the final product, but can be used for the “review copy” (see Graduate College Review on page 22).



Print Size and Font

For the body of the text, use 12 pt type and Times New Roman font. This font type should also be used in tables, figures, and page numbers. Italics may be used as required for scientific names or species, book or journal titles, and other situations indicated in the style manual approved by the faculty in your program. Scientific writing will require specific symbols for units of measure or other situations fitting the discipline. All text must be in black ink.


Margins

Print thesis text on one side per page (see page 25 for exceptions to this policy for thesis documents which exceed 300 pages in length). The left margin must be set at 1.5 inches to allow for binding of the document. Top, right, and bottom margins must be 1 inch. These are NOT the default settings of Microsoft Word, so you will need to adjust them for every “section” of your document. These margins apply to all portions of the thesis, including appendices, illustrations, tables, and graphs.


Do not leave empty space at the bottom of a page, except when at the end of a major heading (chapter). If a table or figure does not fit on that page and is put on the next page, fill in this blank space with the next available text down to the bottom margin or top footnote, even if this text is on a new subject.
Page Numbering

Page numbers should be centered and ½ inch from the bottom of each page. Note that the default for footers in Word appears to be two lines: Your page number is inserted on the upper line so you don’t see the lower (empty) one. When you set your footer to be ½”, you also need to delete this empty line below the number in order to get the page number in the proper position.

The title page is counted as “i” although the pagination is not shown. Additional pages prior to the body of the thesis should be numbered with small Roman numerals (ii, iii, etc.). The body of the thesis through the appendix should be numbered with Arabic numerals (1, 2, 3, etc.). Page numbers should be centered in portrait layout even though tables and figures may be shown in landscape formats. For instructions on moving the page number on landscape pages, see the appropriate supplement to the Thesis Guide on the Graduate College website (http://graduate.missouristate.edu).


Paragraphs

Indent all paragraphs ½ inch. Do not put extra spacing between paragraphs. In addition, paragraphs should be formatted so that there is zero added space above/below them. Justify on the left side only. Consult the style manual approved by the faculty in your program to determine appropriate actions on widow and orphan issues.


Spacing

Double space the body of the text, including between paragraphs. Some versions of Word will default to adding additional spacing between paragraphs, and the “before” and “after” spacing in the paragraph settings need to be set to 0 pt.

Single spacing is required for the abstract, footnotes, quotations of five lines or more separated from the paragraph, table headings, figure captions, and items within in a bulleted/numbered list (double space between items). In addition, single spacing is acceptable for subheadings in the Table of Contents and in the Acknowledgement Page if this enables these sections to be one page. Finally, references should also be single spaced within the reference and double spaced between references.
Abbreviations

Each abbreviation and acronym should be introduced in parenthesis immediately after the first use of the complete word or phrase. The only exception is that this can be omitted for very uniformly accepted and understood abbreviations, such as USA, FBI, DNA, and for common units of measure (e.g., g for grams, cm for centimeters).


Headings

Headings are essential for dividing the body of the thesis, and a standard format is required by the Graduate College. This format may be an exception to the style manual approved by the faculty in your program, but you are to follow the Thesis Guide. Headings should be descriptive, focus attention on distinctive sections, and thus enable a quick targeting of salient information addressed in the thesis. Depending on the nature of the subject, more than one level of heading may be appropriate. It is vital that there is a consistency in placement and other aspects of formatting headings that divide the text.

Start main (primary) headings on a new page. These primary headings should be centered, bold, upper case, and separated from the text that follows by an extra space (blank line). Secondary headings should follow a blank line (double-spacing), be placed at the left margin, bold, and capitalize only the first letter of words. Tertiary headings will be placed as the first word(s) of the paragraph of that section, indented, bolded, first letter of words capitalized, and followed by a period. Fourth level headings should be indented, underlined, with the first letter of words capitalized, followed by a period; fifth level heading should be indented, italicized with the first letter of words capitalized, followed by a period. The first sentence of the paragraph will then follow on the same line for 3rd-5th level headings. The format of primary, secondary, and tertiary headings is modeled in this Thesis Guide. Make sure your Table of Contents matches these heading types.
It is not acceptable to have just one subheading under a larger heading. For example, if you are to use secondary headings under a primary heading, there must be two or more headings. This would be analogous to an outline that has an “A” but no “B.” In other words, you must break up a larger heading into at least two smaller headings.

Citation of Literature

Every reference cited in the text should be listed in the Literature Cited (Reference) section that follows the main body of the thesis. Likewise, references listed in the Literature Cited section will have been cited in the text or they should not be listed. This one-to-one correspondence between citations and listing of references is essential.



Citations. The manner of literature citations made in the text, as well as the format of the Literature Cited (Reference) section of the thesis, varies with discipline. The most important consideration in citation of references is consistency. Most often, the citations in the text are done using the author and date system. Two applications of this system are: (a) “A recent survey of perceptions of graduate students indicated the primary barrier to obtain an advanced degree is writing the thesis (Smith and Jones, 2008)”; and (b) “Smith and Jones (2008) concluded from a survey of graduate student perceptions that writing the thesis is the primary barrier to obtaining a degree.” However, since even formatting by the name and date system is not done in the same manner in each discipline, please follow explicitly the style manual agreed upon with your advisor. The Graduate College does not dictate this choice, but you must be consistent in details such as:

  • Use of “and” vs. “&”

  • Use of “et al.” when a reference has multiple authors

  • Punctuation within citations, and between citations that are in the same parentheses




  • When multiple references are cited together, use the proper sequence (chronological and alphabetical)




  • Use lower case (a,b,c…) when you have multiple references by the same author in the same year. For example: (Bird, 2008a) and (Bird, 2008b). The same letters must be present in the reference list too.


Listing References. Each reference cited in the text must be listed in the Literature Cited (Reference) section. The style and sequence or order of arranging elements within a reference will follow the style manual your advisor has indicated. Similarly, the order of listing references should conform to that style manual. While an alphabetical listing is the most common method, some disciplines have their own unique approach. As with citing the references in the thesis text, the format used to list the references must be consistent; each reference listed must be in the same format.
Tables, Figures, Illustrations, and Appendices

These elements of a thesis are intended to be concise, focused forms of communication. A reader should be able to gain the salient information without reliance on extensive reading of the text. Titles (captions), headings, labels, graph axes, symbols, abbreviations, and other elements of figures, tables, and illustrations must be self-explanatory. A figure, table, or illustration can either occupy a separate page of the thesis or be integrated within a page of text, but this must be consistent throughout the entire thesis. If included on pages with text, there must be a blank line (double-spacing) before and after the table/figure to clearly set it apart from the text. The text must cite a figure or table when those data are noted. For example: “Graduate enrollment at Missouri State University reached its highest level in 2002 (Table 1).” Relative to where a figure/table is first mentioned in the text, the figure/table must be put lower on that page or on the next available page. Alternatively, some formats put all the figures/tables at the end of that section (such as Results) or at the end of the thesis (after references). If this method is used, present all tables (in the order mentioned in the text), and then present all figures.



As stated previously, there should not be blank space at the bottom of a page (except if it is the end of a “chapter,” since each major heading must start on a new page). This frequently means a table/figure that is put on the page following its first mention will not be immediately after the paragraph where it is named. There may be text on the next topic added to fill the page to the bottom.

Tables. Tabular data, whether numerical or words, are appropriate for a table format. Tables might include a variety of types of data (measurement, calculation, and description), statistical analysis, lists, or succinct descriptions. To be a “tables”, it must display the information in two or more columns and two or more rows (column and row headers do not count as “data”). One column of information should be formatted as a list. Several general guidelines apply; an example is provided after the following instructions (Table 1). Thesis tables should look like the example below (NOTE: dotted lines on example do not show when printed).


  • The table number and accompanying title/caption is placed above the body of the table. Follow your selected style manual as to whether these elements are centered or left justified without indentation, and whether each word starts with a capital letter.




  • Table captions should be focused, descriptive, and short. However, it may need to be 2-3 lines so that the table and caption are self-explanatory. Captions should be single spaced.




  • Use a solid line above and below the body of the table, thus delimiting table.




  • Follow main column headings by a line that separates them from the data.




  • Use horizontal lines within the headings section to encompass several common elements.




  • Vertical lines and gridlines are not acceptable in a table. Instead, use extra space to separate rows. Generally, rows of data should be double spaced, but this can be reduced to 1.5 spacing if double-spacing prevents the table from fitting on one page.




  • Depending on the number of columns and amount of text in each, the table can extend from margin to margin, or can be narrower. If the latter, it can be left-justified or centered, but this decision must be consistent for all tables narrower than the page margins.




  • Spacing within a row of the table can be single-spaced if lots of text, but additional spacing is required between rows of the table (2x or 1.5x).




  • Excessively large and complex tables that require multiple pages are discouraged, but if necessary, secondary pages should state “Table X continued” and repeat the headings (and footnotes, if any).




  • Table footers are used to explain symbols, give notes on a statistical analysis, define abbreviations, amplify certain aspects of the table, or recognize sources.




  • Theses including tables should provide a List of Tables (table number, title, and page) section following the Table of Contents. It is not necessary to include the entire table caption here, just what might be considered the table “title” (often the first few words of the caption).



Figures. These include a variety of illustrative materials such as graphs, charts, schematics and diagrams, line drawings, maps, photographs, and photomicrographs. The following guidelines apply:

  • Figure captions should be placed immediately below the figure. This includes the figure number (e.g., Figure 1) followed by a concise, descriptive statement. The figure caption should only be placed on the prior page if space prohibits placement directly below the figure. The figure caption can line-up with the left edge of the figure or the left margin: if less than one line and the figure is centered, another option is to center the captions too. It is generally easier to type the figure caption as part of the thesis text rather than as part of the figure itself. The example figure below shows this formatting (Figure 1).




  • Figures should be large enough and be easily interpreted.




  • Use the same font style for the axes labels, axes numbers, figure legend/labeling, etc. as you use for the thesis text.




  • Number figures sequentially through the manuscript.




  • Color can be used in graphs, maps, photos, etc. If color is used, please be aware that there is an additional cost (to the student) for each bound copy.




  • Glossy prints, photomicrographs, or other figures not produced on the regular thesis paper should be mounted (specific method optional) in such a matter as to ensure permanency.




  • Theses including figures should provide a list of Figures (figure number, title, and page) following the Table of Contents. It is not necessary to include the entire figure caption here, just what might be considered the figure “title” (often the first few words of the caption).

Table 1. Graduate Enrollment at Missouri State University. Data are divided by gender and shown by year. Post-baccalaureate students are included.







Fall Semester Headcount 1

Year

Male

Female

Total

2000

1052

1952

3004

2001

1080

2025

3105

2002

1095

2175

3270

2003

1108

2051

3159

2004

1088

1757

2845

2005

1057

1714

2771

2006

1160

1824

2984

2007

1213

1880

3093


1 Includes full-time and part-time students.
Illustrations. Black ink must be used for hand-lettering or ink work. Photographs not already in digital formats or other illustrations may be scanned and inserted or mounted (either with spray glue or by dry-mounting process) on thesis paper and must be within the margins stipulated. These are all considered “figures”.

Fall Semester Headcount

Figure 1. Graduate Enrollment at Missouri State University. Data are divided by gender and shown by year. Post-baccalaureate students are included.



Numerals. Numbers in the text or table that are less than 1.00 should be consistently formatted—either all including a zero prior to the decimal point or none (e.g., all 0.123 or all .123).

Appendices. Appendices are for including documentation or details that are not part of the formal thesis, but you want them bound with the thesis for someone to access later. For example, appendices may include information that would not be sent to a professional journal to be part of a publication. These should be listed in your Table of Contents and each must be mentioned at least once in the body of the thesis (often in parentheses) as you would cite each reference. If you have more than one appendix, the order of your appendices at the back must match the order in which they are mentioned.

If you have just one appendix, format the heading “APPENDIX” at the top of the page and in the Table of Contents as a primary heading. If you have more than one appendix, make “APPENDICES” your primary heading and treat each appendix as a secondary heading (Appendix A, Appendix B, etc.). To avoid confusion, tables and/or figures in these appendices should not be called “tables and figures” or be included in the Lists of Tables/Figures: Start captions with “Appendix B. …” If you want to put multiple pieces (text, tables, figures) within one appendix (i.e., tertiary divisions), these can be called Appendix B-1, Appendix B-2, etc.




STYLE GUIDES
A number of formatting elements are not addressed in the previous section because of the wide variation in practices from one discipline to another. No single style guide or manual is satisfactory for providing guidance in the preparation of theses from across all disciplines. The choice of a style guide or manual to assist you will be guided by the nature of the thesis and the professional standards of your academic discipline. Consult with your thesis advisor concerning use of a style manual for form and style that have not been addressed in this Thesis Guide. Advisors may often request that you adopt the style of a specific journal. The style manual (or journal format) selected must be specified in the Student Checklist.

Below are some helpful resources available to you when formatting your paper to your specific style.



Style Guides - Meyer Library

http://guides.library.missouristate.edu/citationandstyleguides

The Style Guides contain information on APA, Chicago, MLA, Turabian, AP, AMA, CSE, and many others. Most are outside links. The Citation and Style Guides page also shows the location of the manuals in Meyer Library.

MSU Writing Center

http://writingcenter.missouristate.edu/
Writing consultants can aid in every part of the writing process, including brainstorming, researching, drafting, revising, and organizing a paper. Consultants also assist writers with grammar, punctuation, and the citation methods of the Modern Language Association, the American Psychological Association, the American Medical Association, and the Associated Press, among others.

Citation formatting online resource:

www.citationmachine.netTHESIS REVIEW AND SUBMISSION


Research Involving Humans or Animals
Missouri State University requires "All research involving human subjects in any way, regardless of the source of support funds, must be reviewed by the Protection of Human Subjects Institutional Review Board (IRB) before it is undertaken." The University policy is in accordance with the federal government regulations 45 CFR 46 Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects.  Applicants are required to complete training before engaging in projects involving human participants. In addition, the Privacy Rule of the Human Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) took effect on April 14, 2003 and it contains additional requirements for anyone conducting human participant research that involves protected health information (PHI).  Complete information on these requirements and the required on-line training can be found on the Office of Sponsored Research website, http://www.srp.missouristate.edu/. No thesis will be accepted by the Graduate College in which these requirements are not completed. Approval by the IRB must be indicated in the thesis. This can be done by either including a copy of the approval letter in the appendix, or by a statement in the Methods section where participants are described similar to the following: “Prior approval for this project was obtained from the Missouri State University IRB (April 1, 2001; approval #2001-36).”
The U.S. Public Health Service (PHS) Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals requires institutions to establish and maintain proper measures to ensure the appropriate care and use of all animals involved in research, research training, and biological testing activities conducted or supported by the PHS. In accordance with this policy, the University requires that all projects proposing to use live vertebrate animals have been reviewed and approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) prior to the start of the project. No thesis will be accepted by the Graduate College in which these requirements are not completed. Approval by the IACUC must be indicated in the thesis. This can be done by either including a copy of the approval letter in the appendix, or by a statement in the Methods section where animal care/treatment is described similar to the following: “Prior approval for this project was obtained from the Missouri State University IACUC (April 1, 2001; approval #2001-36).”
Research involving recombinant DNA techniques and other biohazards (e.g., infectious or venomous agents) must be reviewed by the Institutional Biosafety Committee (IBC). The IBC will: review the proposed research and consult with researchers on biosafety procedures; train faculty, staff, and students involved in biohazardous research to obtain compliance with appropriate rules; conduct surveillance of laboratories using these techniques/agents; and investigate accidents involving biohazardous agents.
Graduate College Review

Prior to submitting the “review copy” of your thesis to the Graduate College, it is highly recommended that you submit your thesis to SafeAssignment. This service is free to you, and will help you check that you have referenced appropriately and avoid plagiarism. For instructions on uploading your thesis to SafeAssignment, see the appropriate supplement to the Thesis Guide on the Graduate College website (http://graduate.missouristate.edu).

One (1) hard copy of the thesis and a digital copy, which has been approved by your committee, must be submitted to the Graduate Office for review approximately two weeks before the end of the semester (see current Graduate Calendar for specific deadlines). The digital copy must be in one Word document. For instructions on combining preliminary pages and body of thesis into one document, see the appropriate supplement to the Thesis Guide on the Graduate College website (http://graduate.missouristate.edu).

In addition, if following a professional journal’s format for details not specified in this Thesis Guide, submit a recent article published in that journal. The “review” copy is a thesis in final form, not a working draft; however this copy does not need to be on bond paper. The Acceptance/Signature page must include original signatures of all members of the thesis committee. Also, the student must include a signed Student Checklist found in this Thesis Guide (see below). Once the thesis is reviewed by the Graduate College, you will be asked to pick up the copy and will receive a memo outlining changes (if any) that need to be made. You will have approximately two weeks following graduation (a specific date will be noted on the memo from the Graduate College) to make any requested corrections and submit final copies. No other changes/editing are allowed at that point, so all changes desired by the student and thesis committee must be completed before submitting the review copy to the Graduate College.



Final Copies

Once appropriate changes have been made, a digital copy, to be maintained by the Missouri State University Libraries, and at least three (3) unbound final copies of the thesis must be submitted to the Graduate College. The format of the digital copy must be in an archival PDF (PDF/A-1a). For instructions converting a Word or normal PDF document to this special format, see the appropriate supplement to the Thesis Guide on the Graduate College website (http://graduate.missouristate.edu). Please note that some documents may require conversion using PDF/A-1b. Documents converted as PDF/A-1b are compatible and can be submitted as a digital copy.

Please submit the final copies in 8 ½ x 11” box; do not use metal clips to hold the theses together as they will leave indentations in the paper. The minimum requirement is for a laser-printed original with all committee signatures and two suitable copies, all on 100% cotton-fiber bond white paper. Two copies are retained by the Library (one as an archival copy; the other as a circulation copy). The third copy is retained by the department (which may give it to the advisor or student). Additional copies for advisors, family, friends, etc., may be submitted for binding, and these will be available for the student to pick up from the department after they are returned from the bindery (usually 4-6 months).

Once you have turned in your hard copies and a binding fee to the Graduate College, you will need to enter information into the thesis database and upload the archival PDF file of your thesis. For instructions on how to do this, see the appropriate supplement to the Thesis Guide on the Graduate College website (http://graduate.missouristate.edu).

Thesis documents that exceed 300 pages in length must be printed as two-sided documents unless the depth of the document is less than 2 inches. This will depend on the weight of the cotton paper that you choose. In order to maintain a 1.5 inch inner margin in this case, the formatting must be adjusted. In Microsoft Word 2003, this is accomplished by going to “Page Setup” under “File” and clicking on the “Margins” tab. In this tab is a selection for Pages – Multiple Pages (found in middle of the box). In order to prepare the document for two-sided printing, select “Mirror Margins” from the dropdown box. In Microsoft Word 2007, this is accomplished by going to the “Page Layout” tab, and clicking on the “Margins” option. In this option, select “Mirrored” in order to prepare your document for two-sided printing.

For students interested in “publishing” their thesis, one option is to do so electronically through ProQuest/UMI, a for-profit company that has been archiving dissertations and theses for over 70 years (2.7 million dissertations/theses from over 700 institutions). For more information, see the ProQuest/UMI webpage for authors (http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/authors.shtml ). The cost for including a thesis in the ProQuest/UMI searchable database is $55, and is $150 for open-access publishing. These costs are borne by the student. Note that publication as “open-access” may prohibit publishing in some professional journals, so students planning on submitting their theses to a journal should check with the journals in their field before choosing this ProQuest/UMI option.




Binding

Currently, the binding fee is $9.60 per copy, but this is subject to change according to the cost schedule of the company doing the binding. A check for the cost of binding, made payable to Missouri State University is to be presented to the Graduate College when the final theses are submitted. Binding of a thesis takes approximately one semester. Once the bound theses are received, the department will be notified that the bound copies are ready to be picked up in the Library. The department will then contact you to make arrangements for pick-up of any extra copies which you elected to have bound.


Z Grade Form

A “Z” is a deferred grade limited to a specific group of 700-900 level courses. This grade may be assigned when work on a thesis or research project has not been completed within the semester of enrollment. A Thesis “Z” Grade Removal form will be given to a student when the review copy of the thesis is picked up. This form must be signed by the thesis advisor and must accompany the final copies of a thesis submitted to the Graduate College.


Application for Graduation

Each student must apply to graduate. The deadline for this application is the first week of the semester he/she plans to graduate. Applications for graduation may be completed at the Graduate College office (CAR 306), or submitted online at http://graduate.missouristate.edu.


Comprehensive Exam Report
Students should verify with their advisors that the form reporting the results of their comprehensive exam (written and/or oral) has been submitted to the Graduate College.

STUDENT CHECKLIST
Submission of thesis

_____ 1. A digital copy (CD) of the thesis review copy is submitted along with the hard copy according the instructions of the Graduate College.

_____ 2. Specify the style manual (or professional journal) used as a supplement to this Thesis Guide for details such as citation/reference formatting [REQUIRED] _______________

_____ 3. If a journal is used as your style guide, a recent sample article from this journal is attached. A journal’s style guide is NOT sufficient for this requirement.


Title page

_____ 4. Title is in upper-case letters, bolded, doubled-spaced, and centered.

_____ 5. All other entries on the page are centered appropriately.

_____ 6. The format and spacing follows that of the example in the back of the Thesis Guide.

_____ 7. The title on the title page matches the title in other preliminary pages.
Copyright page (if any)

_____ 8. Format follows that of the examples on page 6 (or p. ii) of the Thesis Guide.


Abstract page

_____ 9. Title is in upper-case letters, bolded, double-spaced, and left justified.

_____ 10. All required departmental and degree information is included in the upper left corner.

_____ 11. The abstract is single-spaced and left-justified.

_____ 12. A list of at least five (5) keywords is included.

_____ 13. The Chairperson of your thesis committee has signed at the appropriate location.

_____ 14. The format and spacing follows that of the example in the back of the Thesis Guide.
Acceptance/Signature page

_____ 15. All committee members have signed at the appropriate location.

_____ 16. The format and spacing follows that of the example in the back of the Thesis Guide.
Acknowledgements page (if any)

_____ 17. This includes acknowledgements and/or dedications, in paragraph form, double-spaced unless it exceeds one page.


Table of Contents page

_____ 18. The format follows that described/demonstrated in the Thesis Guide on page vi.

_____ 19. The first item on the Table of Contents starts on page 1.

_____ 20. Each level of subheading included here is indented an additional ½”.


List of Tables page (if any)

_____ 21. This includes all tables in the thesis, excluding those in the Appendix.


List of Figures page (if any)

_____ 22. This includes all figures, plates, or illustrations, excluding those in the Appendix.


Research Compliance (if any)
_____ 23. If human participants were used, proper approval is indicated in the thesis.

_____ 24. If non-human vertebrates were used, proper approval is indicated in the thesis.

_____ 25. If bio-hazardous materials were used, proper approval is indicated in the thesis.
Body of the Thesis

_____ 26. All primary headings within the document are centered, bolded, upper case, and followed by a blank line.

_____ 27. All secondary headings within the document are placed on the left margin,
bolded, with the first letter of words capitalized and preceded by a blank line.

_____ 28. Tertiary headings w/in the document are placed as the first word(s) of that section, indented, bolded, with the first letter of words capitalized, and followed by a period.

_____ 29. Fourth level headings w/in the document are placed as the first word(s) of that section, indented, underlined, with the first letter of words capitalized, and followed by a period.

_____ 30. Fifth level headings w/in the document are placed as the first word(s) of that section, indented, italicized with the first letter of words capitalized, and followed by a period.

_____ 31. Each figure caption is located below the figure displayed (see Thesis Guide for an example).

_____ 32. Each title caption is located above the table displayed.

_____ 33. The format of each table follows that of the example in the Thesis Guide.

_____ 34. Abbreviations are clearly identified the first time that they are used.

_____ 35. All citations in the text are done in a consistent manner.
Reference page

_____ 36. All references consistently follow the style manual approved by your program. Also, they are single-spaced within the reference with a double-space between them.

_____ 37. All references cited in the document are located in the reference list and only those cited in the document are included in the reference list.
Appendix(ces) page(s) (if any)

_____ 38. Headings/subheadings follow instructions in the Thesis Guide.

_____ 39. Contents fit within margins of thesis.
Formatting of the document

_____ 40. 8.5x11 inch paper and all text is in black ink.

_____ 41. Times New Roman font and 12 point type is used.

_____ 42. Margins are set at 1.5 inches for the left margin and 1 inch for all other margins.

_____ 43. All text, figures, and tables are located within the margins.

_____ 44. Pages prior to the body of the thesis are numbered with small Roman numerals (with the exception of the title page which has no page number shown) which are centered and are ½ inch from the bottom of each page.

_____ 45. The body of the thesis through the appendices is numbered with Arabic numerals which are centered and are ½ inch from the bottom of each page.

_____ 46. All paragraphs are indented ½ inch, without any extra space between paragraphs.

_____ 47. Text within the body of the thesis is double-spaced with the exception of footnotes, quotations of longer than five lines, table/figure captions, within items of a list, and within references.

_____ 48. Documents over 300 pages are printed two-sided.


I have read the Thesis Guide and reviewed my thesis, and it complies with all of the listed requirements.
_________________________________________ _____________

Signature Date
TITLE OF THESIS (DOUBLE SPACED, ALL UPPER CASE, BOLD,

AND CENTERED)

A (Insert Masters or Doctoral) Thesis

Presented to

The Graduate College of

Missouri State University

In Partial Fulfillment

Of the Requirements for the Degree

(Insert complete title of degree and program, e.g., Master of Science, Biology)


By

(Insert name, e.g., Jane Ann Doe)



(Insert month/year of graduation, e.g., December 2013)
[NOTE: THIS PAGE IS NOT REQUIRED. IF USED, DELETE THIS NOTE AND REPLACE WITH BLANK SPACE TO KEEP THE TEXT BELOW IN IT CURRENT POSITION.]

Copyright 2013 by [Insert your full legal name]


TITLE (DOUBLED SPACED, ALL UPPER CASE, BOLD, LEFT JUSTIFIED)

(Insert academic department, e.g., History)

Missouri State University, (Insert month year, e.g., December 2013)

(Insert title of degree, e.g., Master of Arts)

(Insert your name, e.g., John Doe)
ABSTRACT

The formatting of this abstract should be one paragraph without indenting and single spaced. The length of the abstract is limited to this space so that everything fits on this one page. There must be at least two single-spaced blank lines between the abstract and the line with keywords.

Last line of abstract

KEYWORDS: (list at least five keywords or phrases here: use lowercase and separate with commas; note that if two lines are used, the second line is not indented)
This abstract is approved as to form and content
(Chairperson’s Signature will go here)

_______________________________

(Insert Chairperson’s Name Typed)

Chairperson, Advisory Committee

Missouri State University

TITLE OF THESIS (DOUBLE SPACED, ALL UPPER CASE, BOLD, AND CENTERED)
By

(Insert name, e.g., Roberta Rodrigues)


A (Insert Masters or Doctoral) Thesis

Submitted to the Graduate College

Of Missouri State University

In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements

For the Degree of (Insert title of degree and program, e.g., Master of Arts, English)

(Insert graduation date, e.g., December 2013)

Approved:
_______________________________________

(type committee Chairperson’s name here)


_______________________________________



(type committee member’s name here)

_______________________________________

(type committee member’s name here)

_______________________________________

Julie Masterson, PhD: Dean, Graduate College

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
If desired, a page can be inserted for the purpose of acknowledging the assistance and support of others. A dedication can be included as well, but serves a separate purpose. If used, it should be clearly delineated. Single spacing is acceptable if necessary to keep this all on one page.

I would like to thank the following people for their support during the course of my graduate studies.

A dedication can be included as well. It should be separated from the rest of the acknowledgement. The following is an example.
I dedicate this thesis to (insert person to be dedicated here).

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction 1

Literature Review 1

Animal Studies 4

Human Studies 8

Hypotheses 11
Methods 12

Experimental Design 12

Procedures 14

Statistics 17


Results 20

Experiment One 21

Experiment Two 30
Discussion 37

Data Limitations 40

Applications 46

Summary 55


References 62
Appendices 71

Appendix A. Human Subjects IRB Approval 71

Appendix B. Endocrine Data 72

LIST OF TABLES
Table 1. Graduate Enrollment at Missouri State University. 16

Table 2. Demographic analysis of thesis by department 23

Table 3. Number of theses with long-titled tables. Note that each table caption should be single-spaced if it is more than one line. 54

LIST OF FIGURES
Figure 1. Thesis questionnaire 17

Figure 2. Satisfaction scores 36

Figure 3. Number of theses with long-titled figures. Note that each figure caption should be single-spaced if it is more than one line 64

INTRODUCTION
This is where you begin your thesis. Be sure to indent all paragraphs ½ inch. Do not put extra spacing between paragraphs. In addition, paragraphs should be formatted so that there is zero added space above/below them. Justify on the left side only. Consult the style manual approved by the faculty in your program to determine appropriate actions on widow and orphan issues.
Spacing

Double space the body of the text (except the abstract). Single spacing may be required for footnotes or quotations of five lines or more, and may be used for table headings and figure captions. In addition, single spacing is acceptable for subheadings in the Table of Contents and in the Acknowledgement Page if this enables these sections to be one page. Finally, references may be single spaced within the reference and double spaced between references. Consult the style manual approved by the faculty in your program for appropriate reference format. Also, note that after the primary heading on this page, and before each secondary heading, there are blank lines. This is appropriate spacing format for these types of headings.


Headings

Headings are essential for dividing the body of the thesis, and a standard format is required by the Graduate College. This format may be an exception to the style manual approved by the faculty in your program, but you are to follow the Thesis Guide. Headings should be descriptive, focus attention on distinctive sections, and thus enable a quick targeting of salient information addressed in the thesis. Depending on the nature of the subject, more than one level of heading may be appropriate. It is vital that there is a consistency in placement and other aspects of formatting headings that divide the text.



Start main (primary) headings on a new page. These primary headings should be centered, bold, upper case, and separated from the text that follows by extra space (blank line). Secondary headings should follow a blank line (double-spacing), be placed at the left margin, bold, and capitalize only the first letter of words. Tertiary headings will be placed as the first word(s) of the paragraph of that section, indented, bolded, first letter of words capitalized, and followed by a period. Fourth level headings should be indented, underlined, with the first letter of words capitalized, followed by a period; fifth level heading should be indented, italicized with the first letter of words capitalized, followed by a period. The first sentence of the paragraph will then follow on the same line for 3rd-5th level headings. The format of primary, secondary, and tertiary headings is modeled in this Thesis Guide. Make sure your Table of Contents matches these heading types.

It is not acceptable to have just one subheading under a larger heading. For example, if you are to use secondary headings under a primary heading, there must be two or more headings. This would be analogous to an outline that has an “A” but no “B.”


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