The sentence still exists without the modifier! Openers are always followed by a comma



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Let’s look at openers today. Openers are a type of free modifier.

Here’s the thing to remember with ALL types of free modifiers. The writer tacks them onto (or into) a sentence. The sentence still exists without the modifier!

Openers are always followed by a comma. Where to put the comma? After the opener / before the complete sentence begins!

Examples:
Original Sentence: She glared at her boyfriend.

Because she was angry, she glared at her boyfriend.

Eyes squinting, she glared angrily at her boyfriend.

Furious, she glared at her boyfriend.

Unhappy and upset, she glared at her boyfriend.

While he was looking at another girl, she glared at her boyfriend.

Sitting in the passenger seat, she glared at her boyfriend.


  • Each of the examples show how we can take 2 boring sentences with boring “be” verbs, and jazz them up.

Example: She was angry. She glared at her boyfriend.

Her eyes were squinting as she glared angrily at her boyfriend.

She was furious; she glared at her boyfriend.

She was unhappy and upset. She glared at her boyfriend.

She glared at her boyfriend because he was looking at another girl.

She glared at her boyfriend as she was sitting in the passenger seat.




Name ____________________________________ Per ______

Opener , sentence.

Example: When I was little, I used to collect baseball cards.

Example: ____________________________________, the player performed much better.



Example: _________________________________, I like to relax with a good book.

Example: _________________________________, the sled dog slowed down.


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