The school board of miami-dade county, florida



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SOURCE: “Creating a Pie Chart” adapted from Math is Fun at http://www.mathsisfun.com/data/pie-charts.html; “Hispanic Population of the United States, 2013 and 2060” adapted from TIME for Kids.

Creating a Pie Chart

How do you create a pie chart that shows the size of the data or information you collected? Follow the steps below.




  1. Imagine you asked your classmates which kind of movie they like best. Here are the results:

Table: Favorite Type of Movie

Comedy

Action

Romance

Drama

SciFi

TOTAL

4

5

6

1

4

20



  1. Next, divide each value by the total and multiply by 100 to get a percent:

Comedy

Action

Romance

Drama

SciFi

TOTAL

4

5

6

1

4

20

4/20 = 20%

5/20 = 25%

6/20 = 30%

1/20 = 5%

4/20 = 20%

100%



  1. Now you need to figure out how many degrees for each "pie slice" (correctly called a sector). A full circle has 360 degrees, so we do this calculation:

Comedy

Action

Romance

Drama

SciFi

TOTAL

4

5

6

1

4

20

4/20 = 20%

5/20 = 25%

6/20 = 30%

1/20 = 5%

4/20 = 20%

100%

4/20 × 360°
72°

5/20 × 360°
90°

6/20 × 360°
108°

1/20 × 360°
18°

4/20 × 360°
72°

360°

Creating a Pie Chart (continued)

  1. Now you are ready to start drawing! First, draw a circle. Next, use your protractor to measure the degrees of each sector. Here is the first sector ...

pie chart drawing



  1. The final pie chart looks like this.

pie chart example
Source: Math is Fun, http://www.mathsisfun.com/data/pie-charts.html

Hispanic Population of the United States, 2013 and 2060 (Estimated)
Hispanics are among the fastest growing minority group in the United States. Only Asians are growing faster as a group. The pie chart below show how the Hispanic population is expected to increase between 2013 and 2060. Use the pie charts to complete the questions.
image of chart: to save this image to your hard drive, right-click on the image and select save picture as...

image of chart: to save this image to your hard drive, right-click on the image and select save picture as...

The numbers on the pie charts are in percentages (%).




Questions:


  1. By how many percentage points is the Hispanic population expected to increase between 2013 and 2060?

_______________________________________________________________





  1. True or False: It is expected that in 2060, about one third (1/3) of the U.S. population will be Hispanic.

_______________________________________________________________





  1. What information do you think the U.S. Census Bureau uses to predict population growth?

_______________________________________________________________


_______________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________


  1. Many Hispanics speak both English and Spanish. What are some advantages of knowing two languages?

_______________________________________________________________


_______________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________
Sources: Activity adapted from TIME for Kids; Pie graphs created at Kids’ Zone, http://nces.ed.gov/nceskids/graphing/classic/bar_pie_data.asp?ChartType=pie Internet Resources
Related Web Sites

Celebrate Hispanic Heritage

http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/hispanic/index.htm

Scholastic's home page for Hispanic Heritage resources, which includes information on famous Hispanics/Latinos, games, Teacher’s Guide and a Research Starter providing recommended research topics.


Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month

http://www.cr.nps.gov/nr/feature/hispanic/

The National Register of Historic Places presents lesson plans and much more.


Fact Monster

http://www.factmonster.com/hispanic-heritage-month/

Learn about famous Hispanic Americans or test your knowledge of Hispanic/Latino/Spanish history. Take a Brain Quest quiz on Spanish culture, Latin American geography or famous Hispanic Americans.


Hispanic Heritage Month.org

http://www.hispanicheritagemonth.org/Home_Page.html

Website dedicated to celebrating Hispanic Heritage. Provides fun facts, a proclamation by the president, useful links, and a calendar of events.


Library of Congress/Hispanic Heritage Month

http://hispanicheritagemonth.gov/

Hosted by the Library of Congress, this site provides a myriad of resources (articles, videos, webcasts, audio files) to help celebrate Hispanic and Latino heritage.
NEA/National Hispanic Heritage Month Activities

http://www.nea.org/tools/lessons/hispanic-heritage-month.html

Celebrate National Hispanic Heritage month with these lessons, activities, videos, and more.


PBS/Hispanic Heritage Month

http://www.pbs.org/special/hispanic-heritage-month/

Videos covering Hispanic history, music, current issues, and interviews with notable Hispanics.


Scholastic/24 Great Ideas for Hispanic Heritage Month

http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/article/24-great-ideas-hispanic-heritage-month

Celebrate Hispanic culture - and diversity in general - by studying the Mayan alphabet, dancing to the merengue, adopting an international sister City, and more!



Scholastic/Bring Hispanic Heritage Month to Life: A Collection of Resources

http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/collection/bring-hispanic-heritage-month-life-collection-resources

Celebrate the cultures and traditions of Hispanic Americans. Study the contributions of Hispanic artists and writer and learn more about holidays and celebrations. Contains several activities and unit plans.


Smithsonian Education

http://www.smithsonianeducation.org/educators/resource_library/hispanic_resources.html

Each year, the Smithsonian honors Hispanic Heritage Month with a calendar full of activities. This site contains lessons and interactive exhibitions celebrating Hispanic people and history. Additionally, for Hispanic Heritage Month, Smithsonian Folkways offers free music and videos from Latin American and from Hispanic communities in the U.S. A student activity is included.


The Society of Hispanic Historical and Ancestral Research (SHHAR)

http://shhar.net/

SHHAR (pronounced "share") is a non-profit, volunteer organization with the specific goal of helping Hispanics research their family history. Includes links to many other sites for additional help in genealogical research.


United States Census Bureau

http://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/newsroom/facts-for-features/2014/cb14ff-22_hispanic.pdf

Part of the Census Bureau’s Facts for Features series providing facts and statistics on the Hispanic population in the United States.


What Does My Heritage Mean to Me?

http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/hispanic/heritage.htm

In this Scholastic resource, a handful of Americans explain what Hispanic heritage means to them. Lesson plans included.


Elementary Character Education Activities to Support Hispanic Heritage Month

Elementary Character Education Activities to Support

Hispanic Heritage Month
Core Value: Respect (September) and Responsibility (October)

Miami-Dade County Public Schools (M-DCPS) is committed to helping all students develop the values and strength of character needed for them to become caring, responsible citizens at home, school, and in the community. To support this goal, character education has been an instructional requirement, grades K-12, since 1995.


The foundation of the District’s character education requirement is the nine core values adopted by The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida in 1995. The District’s nine core values are: citizenship, cooperation, fairness, honesty, integrity, kindness, pursuit of excellence, respect, and responsibility. Each month a different core value has been designated for emphasis in all classrooms throughout the District.

In September, students need to understand the importance of respect. Respect should include showing regard for the worth and dignity of everyone. Students should learn to respect individual differences and views of others. Respect should include showing regard for oneself, one’s school, and the rules and expectations for behavior in the school and the community.

In October, students need to understand the importance of responsibility. Responsibility highlights the importance of being accountable for one’s actions and making responsible decisions.

In addition to the enclosed lessons for Hispanic Heritage Month, teachers may further emphasize the core values of respect and responsibility through the following lesson ideas.

Respect:

  • In September and October, we observe Hispanic Heritage Month. Discuss the importance of respecting and celebrating the many cultures that exist within our community.

Ask: What does it mean to treat other people with respect? Ask the class to brainstorm a list of do’s and don’ts for treating people with respect. Compare the student lists to the following Six Rules of Respect:




  1. Treat other people the way you want to be treated.

  2. Be polite and courteous.

  3. Listen to what other people have to say.

  4. Do not insult people, or make fun of them, or call them names.

  5. Do not bully or pick on people.

  6. Do not judge people before you get to know them.

  • Discuss how good manners and following classroom rules generate respect. Brainstorm with students and list the characteristics and behaviors related to being respectful. Try the following exercise. Ask students to pass a pencil, book, or other item to a fellow class member. Then, ask the students to return the item to the same person in a respectful manner. Notice how the two actions differed. Ask students to discuss how the two steps were different. Was one exchange more courteous than the other? Did students say please and thank you? Ask students to discuss how it feels to be treated courteously and with respect.




  • Write down the name of someone in your life right now who you respect very much. Name two things that person does that cause you to respect him or her. Do you share either of those traits with that person? Write about a time recently when you felt you didn't treat someone with respect. Describe the situation. Why did it happen? Was it the right thing to do? What were the consequences? How did it make the other person feel? Would you behave differently if you were given another chance? How, and why or why not? What did you learn from the experience?




  • Create a bulletin board entitled “Respectful Students of the Month” or ”Uncle Sam Wants YOU to be Respectful.” Tell students that during the month of September, their pictures will be placed on the bulletin board as they demonstrate acts of respect. Post a picture of students “caught in the act” of being respectful. Each day, ask students to select other class members to be posted on the bulletin board.




  • Local, national and world events reported in the newspapers or on television often illustrate actions taken by community members or local groups seeking respect. Discuss local or national events and the actions citizens have taken. Have students look through newspapers and magazines for evidence of community members seeking respect. Create space on a bulletin board or a large poster where students can post these stories.




  • In September, we also commemorate Constitution Day (September 17th) and Celebrate Freedom Week (the Declaration of Independence; last week in September). Ask students to think about the men who helped write these documents and the respect they earned for helping to create our new nation (i.e., Founding Fathers). Have students write an essay about one Founding Father explaining what challenges this person met and why they chose this person as an individual that is worthy of respect. Invite students to share essays with other class members.




  • Review the Pledge of Allegiance and the Star Spangled Banner. Have students study and discuss the meaning of the words and importance of reciting or singing them with respect; i.e., standing at attention, placement of right hand over one’s heart.




  • Identify and study national symbols and documents and their meaning; e.g., the Declaration of Independence, the United States Constitution, American flag, Star Spangled Banner, the bald eagle, the Statue of Liberty, the Liberty Bell. Review and discuss how these symbols illustrate respect for our country. Ask students to research and write about the various symbols of national pride and why they deserve our respect. Present these reports to other class members.


Responsibility:

  • Discuss the following guidelines for “How to be a Responsible Person.”

  • Be reliable and dependable. When you agree to do something, do it.

  • Take care of your own business. Don't make others do what you are supposed to do.

  • Take responsibility for your actions. Don't make excuses or blame others. 

  • Use your head; think before you act; imagine the consequences.

Have students think of as many examples of each of the above actions as they can, and write them on the board. Can they think of any other responsible behaviors that should be added to the list? Have a class discussion about these behaviors. Have the children make posters of these behaviors to put up around the school.




  • Ask: How responsible are you? For each of the responsible behaviors listed above rate yourself on a scale of one to five (1=poor, and 5=terrific). For each of these behaviors give an example of how you are either responsible or not, and what you could do to improve.




  • Can you think of a time you did something really irresponsible? Describe it in detail. Why did it happen? How did you feel about it at the time? Did it affect anybody else? Did it cause any problems for you? How do you feel about it now? What did you learn from it? Or, perhaps you would prefer to write about something you did that was very responsible




  • Review classroom rules. Discuss the importance of following rules, acting responsibly, and the consequences if rules are not followed. Ask students to create a list of things they are responsible for at school. Discuss these responsibilities and explain possible consequences of not completing these tasks; e.g., not completing homework assignments or forgetting to perform a classroom job (sharpening pencils, emptying the wastepaper basket, etc.).




  • Ask students to make a list of chores to be done at home. Invite students to list all family members and the chores they are responsible for; e.g., working outside the home, cooking, cleaning the house, paying bills, doing laundry, taking out the trash, feeding pets. Discuss the consequences of not completing tasks. What would happen if a parent did not pay the bills or if someone did not take the trash out?




  • Ask students to create a bulletin board, posters, or banners depicting ways they should act responsibly this month and during the remainder of the school year. Post these throughout the classroom and school. Simultaneously, begin a “Responsible Student of the Week” bulletin board. Each week, invite students to nominate classmates that have demonstrated responsible behavior. Post a picture of these students and have students write a short paragraph explaining why these students deserve this honor. These essays may also be posted by the student’s pictures.




  • Invite a guest speaker to visit classrooms to discuss their career responsibilities with students. Discuss how we depend on others to act responsibly. Ask the guest speaker to describe the consequences that would occur if he/she did not act responsibly in their position. Ask students to think about a career they would like to have in the future. Ask them to write about the responsibilities involved in holding this position.




  • Plan a group/class service project. Give each student a specific task to accomplish or responsibility to meet. After the task is completed, discuss the role of each individual in “doing his/her part” to accomplish the entire group’s project.




  • Watch for news or television programs that illustrate responsible actions by individuals or groups. Discuss the positive effects these actions have on our community and on our lives.




  • Begin a school or classroom election campaign. Invite students to run for various elected positions; e.g. class president, vice-president, secretary. Ask each student to prepare a speech explaining why he/she would be the most responsible candidate for the position. Students may also write essays describing the qualities they feel would be necessary for successfully filling these roles.


Other On-going Activities to Promote Character Education


  • Invite all students and teachers to an assembly/pep-rally in the school cafeteria, auditorium, or P.E. courts to kick-off character education school-wide. Ask a spirited teacher, parent, principal or guest speaker to motivate students and address character education goals and core values for the coming school year.




  • Create a character education steering group made up of administrators, teachers, parents and students that meets regularly to plan activities and events celebrating each monthly value.




  • Start a character education book club. Ask the media specialist, language arts or social studies teacher for book recommendations related to the core value of the month. Students should read books related to a particular topic, subject, or author; e.g., books written by a person striving toward a goal. Students may share, discuss and/or report their findings back to the class. Keep a class or personal log of the books read.




  • Make character education a regular part of the school day and curriculum. Incorporate student homework related to each designated monthly value. A school newsletter may incorporate information on character education and offer daily suggestions for how to demonstrate each month’s value. Morning announcements may also provide an opportunity to support each month’s designated value.

Source: Adapted from activities developed by goodcharacter.com, http://www.goodcharacter.com/EStopics.html



Anti-Discrimination Policy

Federal and State Laws

The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida adheres to a policy of nondiscrimination in employment and educational programs/activities and strives affirmatively to provide equal opportunity for all as required by:



Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 - prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, or national origin.

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as amended - prohibits discrimination in employment on the basis of race, color, religion, gender, or national origin.

Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 - prohibits discrimination on the basis of gender.

Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 (ADEA) as amended - prohibits discrimination on the basis of age with respect to individuals who are at least 40.

The Equal Pay Act of 1963 as amended - prohibits gender discrimination in payment of wages to women and men performing substantially equal work in the same establishment.

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 - prohibits discrimination against the disabled.

Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) - prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities in employment, public service, public accommodations and telecommunications.

The Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (FMLA) - requires covered employers to provide up to 12 weeks of unpaid, job-protected leave to "eligible" employees for certain family and medical reasons.

The Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978 - prohibits discrimination in employment on the basis of pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions.

Florida Educational Equity Act (FEEA) - prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, gender, national origin, marital status, or handicap against a student or employee.

Florida Civil Rights Act of 1992 - secures for all individuals within the state freedom from discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, handicap, or marital status.

Title II of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA) - Prohibits discrimination against employees or applicants because of genetic information.

Veterans are provided re-employment rights in accordance with P.L. 93-508 (Federal Law) and Section 295.07 (Florida Statutes), which stipulate categorical preferences for employment.

In Addition: School Board Policies 1362, 3362, 4362, and 5517 - Prohibit harassment and/or discrimination against students, employees, or applicants on the basis of sex, race, color, ethnic or national origin, religion, marital status, disability, genetic information, age, political beliefs, sexual orientation, gender, gender identification, social and family background, linguistic preference, pregnancy, and any other legally prohibited basis.  Retaliation for engaging in a protected activity is also prohibited. Rev. (05-12)
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