Teacher Education Program (tep) Field Handbook



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Information for 2nd Qtr. Field Placement - Cooperating Teachers

Autumn 2014
Thank you so much for your willingness to give your time and energy to help prepare new teachers!
We really hope that having a teaching candidate in your room will be a benefit to the many demands on you, so please put your student to work in whatever capacity you see fit! They are anxious to start working with students and will have MANY questions for you. Please schedule weekly meetings with your Teaching Candidate (TC) to make sure that you cover everything. Here’s what you can expect from your TC this quarter:
This is the first school/field experience for our TEP students. They have had one quarter of coursework. They’ve had very little lesson planning practice and are not prepared to teach whole class or content-rich lessons. Later in the quarter they will be required to plan and teach one lesson to an individual and/or small group, to be observed by the UW Coach. The TC will work with you to plan lessons that complement what you’re working on in the classroom.
Please help establish the TC as a co-teacher. They shouldn’t be sitting in the back observing all day long, but should interact with the students and assist you whenever possible.

In addition:





  • The TCs will have quite a few projects for their UW classes, so they will need both time and access to students on a regular basis to complete this work. We understand how demanding the curriculum and schedule is, so please do what works for you and your students. Most of their assignments are due September 22.

  • For the formal observation: It is the responsibility of the TC to schedule a time that is convenient (and helpful) to you. After the lesson the University Coach will conference with the students for up to an hour. You are welcome (but not expected) to attend and provide feedback. The TC must provide a written lesson plan for each lesson s/he teaches, whether s/he is being observed or not. Plans must be submitted to you in advance for your feedback prior to teaching.

  • In December, TC and CT will each reflect on TC growth, using an End of Quarter Formative Assessment, to determine readiness to move on and assume more responsibility.

For your reference:



Elementary TEP Honoraria 2014-15

All honoraria are on a per student/per quarter basis


Quarter Cooperating Teacher Site Coordinator
Autumn Qtr. 2 $50 $25
Winter Qtr. 3 $175 $50
Spring Qtr. 4 $300 $50

Site Liaison/Coordinator Monthly Meetings
Autumn 2014
During the autumn we ask that each building site coordinator bring the teacher candidates together for a monthly meeting. These meetings are a place where they can both reflect and share about their experiences in your building, as well as get valuable building-specific information and questions answered. The information below will serve as suggestions for how to conduct the autumn meetings. You may also have ideas you wish to share with other site coordinators and the UW.
Starting the meeting:

Some site coordinators have found it helpful to start with a reflective question such as:

“As you work to understand each student as a learner, can you identify some important information about an individual that has helped you be more successful in helping them learn?” Other site coordinators start their meetings with a “Wows and Wonders” kind of reflection. “Wow, I am so impressed by the subtle ways my CT turns negative behaviors around. I wonder how I will be able to do that when I am the lead teacher!”
Possible meeting topics:

October/November/December



  • planning and conducting parent conferences

  • classroom management plans in the building

  • specific content curriculum adoptions

  • human resources available in the building and at the district level


At your December meeting, you may wish to ask the TCs to brainstorm a list of topics that they would like to start discussing in January.
Staying in touch with the CTs in your building:

Please stay in regular communication with the Cooperating Teachers with personal check-ins or via email weekly to ensure that appropriate progress is being made. Notify the coach if there is any concern expressed by the CT.


Thank you again for your time and energy in collaborating with the UW to develop

the next generation of teachers.

3rd Quarter Field Requirementsby role
ELTEP, Winter Quarter
Each Teaching Candidate (TC) in the Teacher Education Program (TEP) will work Wednesday through Friday in his/her assigned building with the Cooperating Teacher from last quarter. When not at the school site, the TC will be attending campus courses and continuing their Action for Inquiry project. TCs will begin by working with small groups. As the quarter progresses, TCs will take on increasing co-teaching responsibility to demonstrate readiness for full-time co-teaching.
TEP Student Responsibilities

  1. Work on a regular basis with small groups. As the quarter progresses, assume increasing responsibility for management of the whole class.

  2. Plan and confer at a regularly scheduled time each week with the Cooperating Teacher. Discuss expectations for campus/field assignments with your CT in order to effectively complete them.

  3. Continue to strengthen your lesson planning skills and demonstrate knowledge of the Common Core Standards. Submit all lesson plans to the CT at least one day prior to teaching, or as requested by your CT. Written plans are required for all lessons you teach.

  4. Arrange for your University Coach to observe you three times this quarter. Prior to each observation, prepare a lesson plan and submit it to your Coach in advance for feedback.

  5. Attend weekly meetings with the cohort in your building, as arranged by the Site Coordinator.

  6. Keep a record of parent/guardian contacts using the Parent/Guardian contact form provided by your University Coach.

  7. Keep current lesson plans and reflections in a notebook available at all times for your University Coach and CT.

  8. Complete all campus/field assignments and attend all Field Based Seminars. Continue to accumulate a working collection of documents, student work and other artifacts that demonstrate your positive impact on student learning and professional growth. Follow school district policy in using student work.

  9. In order to advance to full-time student co-teaching, all TCs must earn a “3” in the following three categories of the formal observation form: planning, instruction and assessment. If a student is not meeting expectations at the end of the quarter, a conference of university and school personnel will be held to review performance and to determine the appropriate course of action.

  10. Complete the Quarterly Assessment and meet with your TC and Coach to identify “grows and glows.”


Cooperating Teacher Responsibilities

  1. Assist the TC in organizing a tentative co-teaching schedule for the quarter. Arrange for him/her to work on a regular basis with small and large groups.

  2. Meet with your TC at a regularly scheduled time each week. Share lesson planning strategies, management ideas, curriculum goals, assessment tools, and information about students.

  3. Review and provide feedback on all lesson plans in advance of the TC’s teaching. Assist the TC in developing his/her own style of teaching.

  4. Allow the TC increasing responsibility, progressing to co-planning and co-teaching for two full consecutive days.

  5. Evaluate your TC’s student progress through informal observations and at weekly conferences. (Please see the CT guide in this handbook for observation resources.) Provide encouragement and positive reinforcement as well as suggestions for improvement as needed.

  6. Take time to confer briefly with the University Coach when s/he is in the building. Plan to attend at least one formal observation and conference with the Coach and TC. If issues arise between visits from the Coach, make contact with him/her to discuss a resolution.

  7. Keep in contact with the Site Coordinator.

  8. Complete the 3rd Quarterly Assessment. Take part in the end of quarter conference with the Coach and TC to ensure consensus on the student’s readiness for full-time co-teaching.

Site Coordinator Responsibilities

  1. Arrange meetings with building cohort of TEP students to reflect and share ideas on topics such as management, strategies for beginning class, assessment, working with building specialists and parents, etc.

  2. Check on the progress of each TC in his/her placement. Provide an opportunity for CTs to contribute input regarding their TCs.

  3. When possible, informally observe the TEP students in your building to provide feedback and support. (Please see the CT guide in this handbook for observation resources.)

  4. Attend scheduled Site Coordinator meetings (on UW campus or a school site) and communicate any relevant information to the CTs.

University Coach Responsibilities


  1. Meet with the CTs and TCs early in the quarter to discuss responsibilities and expectations. Give students copies of the Parent/Guardian Contact form.

  2. Provide instruction and support in lesson planning. Review plans prior to each observation and give feedback.

  3. Maintain close communications with the CT, TCs and Site Coordinator. Try to have personal, written or telephone contact with the CT after each observation. Help solve field-based problems and notify the Elementary Program Coordinator when necessary.

  4. Formally observe at least three lessons and schedule a conference as soon as possible following each lesson. One formal observation should be made with the CT. Explain your scoring on the formal observation form and work with TCs to meet expectations in planning, instruction and assessment in order to begin full-time co-teaching.

  5. Provide suggestions for documents and artifacts that the TC may want to include in his/her working notebook.

  6. Arrange and lead the 3 way conference with the CT and TC at the end of the quarter to review the Quarterly Formative Assessment and reach consensus about the student’s readiness to begin full-time co-teaching.

Winter Quarter Suggested Timeline
for Teaching Candidate on Assuming Teaching Responsibility
**This is a guide. Each TC progresses at his/her own pace and the CT, TC and Coach will work together to determine the best schedule for everyone.

Date % TC Should Be the Lead Co-Teacher

Early-mid January

1-3 lessons per week, graduating to whole class. TC can start leading daily class routines.

Late January-Mid February

In addition to routines, TC can take one subject to teach on Thursdays and Fridays, other lessons as agreed upon.

Mid to late February

TC is lead co-teacher 50% of the day on Thurs and Fri.

Late February to Early March

TC is lead teacher 50-75% of the day on Thurs and Fri.

Early March

TC is lead teacher 50-100% of the day (or as agreed upon by CT, Coach and TC).

Minimum of Four Weeks in the Spring (not necessarily consecutive if testing, edTPA or breaks interfere)

TC is lead co-teacher for each full week. TC takes spring break with your school.

Mid-Late May

TCs on campus for 2 days (TBD) week to work on edTPA.


Late May until the last contracted day in June for your district

CT and TC continue to co-teach.

Because TCs are not there Monday and Tuesday, it is understood that Wednesday could be more of a TRANSITION / catch-up day, and the TC might not teach as many lessons. Also, an important caveat is to remember that the TCs have many UW assignments THAT REQUIRE IN-CLASS TIME TO COMPLETE (e.g. WORKING WITH A STUDENT OR TAKING A MATH SURVEY WITH A GROUP) and won’t always be able to take on full responsibility in any given week. Please keep an open dialogue about the workload and make adjustments to the schedule above as needed.



_________________________________________________________________________________________________

Suggestions for planning:

  • Communication between the TC and CT is critical for co-teaching. Make arrangements to have regular and ongoing co-planning conversations.

  • Start with outlines and move towards implementation.

  • CTs: PROVIDING the curricula for upcoming weeks to your TCs so they can begin planning WOULD HELP EXPEDITE THE PROCESS. They can make copies from the manuals and give them back to you.

  • TCs should make lesson plan templates for routine lessons in the class. Those can then be simply added/adjusted on any given day.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________

It might also be helpful to make a list of RESPONSIBILITIES / TASKS (jobs) in your classroom, and discuss how the TC will gradually take them over (with your support!). Here is an incomplete sample list (please add to it!):

Attendance

Transitions (both taking students to specialists, recess, etc. and also transitions between subjects)

Parent communication (newsletters, phone calls, handling questions, etc. in person)



Team meetings (IEPs, etc.).
4th Quarter Field Requirementsby role
ELTEP, Spring Quarter
Each Teaching Candidate (TC) in the Teacher Education Program (TEP) will be in their full-time co-teaching position in their assigned buildings Monday-Friday on the teachers’ contracted schedule. TCs will begin their full-time co-teaching role as deemed appropriate by their UW coach and CT. The TC will assume the lead in the co-teaching responsibilities for planning and instruction. There will continue to be two teachers working in the classroom in a co-teaching model to benefit the K-6 students. TCs will take the spring break of their assigned school, not the UW’s spring break.
TEP Student Responsibilities

  1. Assume the lead co-teaching responsibility for planning, instruction, classroom management and assessment. Assume as much responsibility for communicating with parents/guardians as is permitted by the school. For example: newsletters, calls home, arranging for volunteers, participating in conferences, etc. Discuss all parent/guardian contacts with your CT for approval before you make the contact. Continue to keep a record of your contacts in the form given to you by your UW Coach.

  2. Plan and confer at a regularly scheduled time each week with the Cooperating Teacher. Share your lesson and unit plans in advance for approval and input as well as to discuss the co-teaching responsibilities. Keep weekly and daily unit and lesson plans in an organized file or notebook and make it available at any time for your UW Coach and the CT.

  3. Arrange for your University Coach to observe you no fewer than three (in cases more Observations will be necessary, as determined by CT and Coach). Prior to each observation, prepare a lesson plan and submit it to your Coach in advance for feedback.

  4. Attend meetings with the cohort in your building, as arranged by the Site Coordinator.

  5. Continue to accumulate a working collection of documents, student work, and other artifacts that demonstrate your positive impact on student learning and professional growth. Follow school district policy in using student work and taking photos.

  6. Toward the end of April, plan a 3-5 day teaching event in your assigned edTPA subject area. Consider your spring break, MSP dates, curricular demands, etc. to determine the best week to focus on your edTPA. Complete all planning, filming, and as much of the writing as you are able.

  7. Attend two writing days (TBD) on campus to support you in the completion of your edTPA.

  8. Continue to collaborate and communicate with your cohort and UW faculty as well as your CT, Coach and other building personnel for support and ideas, as you work to meet the needs of the students in your classroom.

  9. Complete your Inquiry for Action project and Professional Growth Plan to demonstrate your growth in one area.


Cooperating Teacher Responsibilities

  1. Assist the TC in assuming the lead role in the co-teaching responsibility of planning, instructing and managing all aspects of the classroom. Determine units and lessons to be taught for the full-time responsibilities and help the TC determine which co-teaching strategies will most benefit the K-6 students.

  2. Meet with your TC at a regularly scheduled time each week to approve plans, discuss management and curriculum goals and student assessments. Help guide the TC in making the parent/guardian contacts such as newsletters, phone calls, emails, conferences, etc.

  3. Review and provide feedback on all lesson plans in advance of the TC’s teaching. Observe the TC’s instruction and provide written feedback as often as possible.

  4. Take time to confer briefly with the University Coach when s/he is in the building. Plan to attend at least one formal observation and conference with the Coach and TC.

  5. Keep in contact with the Site Coordinator. Notify the TEP office if you have concerns or questions that concern the program and/or your TC.

  6. Write a final narrative that will serve as a recommendation for your TC. (Your UW Coach will provide information on how to construct the narrative.) Have a final conference with the UW Coach after full-time co-teaching to review your TC’s summative evaluation.

Site Coordinator Responsibilities


  1. Arrange meetings with building cohort of TEP students to reflect and share ideas on topics such as management, planning, developing strategies for engaging students, analyzing student work and adjusting plans accordingly, etc. Guide the TCs in taking on all aspects of a faculty member in your building including meetings, conferences, activities, etc.

  2. Check with each CT on the progress of all TCs in your building during full-time co-teaching. Inform the UW Coach and/or the Lead Coach Jill Smith at jillh2@uw.edu if there are questions or concerns.

  3. When possible, informally observe the TEP students in your building to provide feedback and support. This could also be a more formal written observation when you feel it is appropriate.

  4. Help TCs arrange a formal interview with the building principal. It is also helpful toward the end of the term to an opportunity for mock interviews with a building administrator.

  5. Attend scheduled Site Coordinator meetings (on UW campus or a school site) and communicate any relevant information to the CTs.


University Coach Responsibilities


  1. Meet with the CTs and TCs early in the quarter to discuss responsibilities and expectations and to schedule observations.

  2. Maintain close communications with the CT, TCs and Site Coordinator. Try to have personal, written or telephone contact with the CT after each observation. Help solve field-based problems and notify the Elementary Program Coordinator when necessary.

  3. Formally observe three or more lessons and schedule a conference as soon as possible following each lesson. One formal observation should be made with the CT. Explain your scoring on the formal observation form and work with TCs to meet expectations in planning, instruction and assessment. After each observation, discuss student work for that (or a previous) lesson and assess the student’s ability to analyze student work for subsequent planning. Attach copies of student work with lesson plans and observation paperwork. Make one final observation after the full-time co-teaching experience.

  4. Provide suggestions for documents and artifacts that the TC may want to include in his/her working notebook. Monitor the organization of daily and unit plans at each visit and give feedback.

  5. Help the student plan a time for their 3-5 day edTPA teaching event.

  6. Write a final narrative at the end of the term for the TC. Give the CTs guidance in writing their letters. These cannot be completed until the TC can be recommended for certification.

Lesson Planning Elements and Guidelines

Required Lesson Plan Elements

For formal observations, we do not require you to use a particular format, but each plan must include the following elements:




  • Long Term Goals/Standards (include Common Core Standards)

  • Immediate Lesson Objectives/Learning Targets/Teaching Point

  • Kid-friendly Objectives

  • Assessment—Formative and Summative

  • Rationale & Student Descriptions

  • Academic Language—Identify the Key Language Demand & Language Functions of the Lesson

  • Materials/Technology Needed

  • Instructional Plan

  • Accommodations, Modifications and Extensions


Elementary TEP Lesson Plan Guidelines

Lesson plans are critical to successful lessons. They guide instruction by helping you focus on essential learning outcomes and how you will judge if students have learned. All lesson plans, regardless of the format, have a set of common characteristics. Below are the parts of a lesson plan we want you to use, and examples of questions to ask yourself as you plan. Some instructors may add specificity under the main headings but all UW instructors and UW coaches will use these general headings.

Overall, as you plan your lesson, thinking carefully through the following questions will help you meet the needs of your students:



  1. Who are the students I am going to teach?

  2. What do they need to know or be able to do? i.e. What will I teach them?

  3. What would be the best way to teach that to this particular child or group of children? i.e. How will I teach them and engage them in learning?

  4. Are there any behavior or classroom management concerns I should address?

  5. How will I know what was learned by whom?

  6. What will I do next?



Long Term Objective

Identify the aligned Common Core Standards that will be addressed.


Lesson Objectives

Think about what you want the student(s) to be able to do or to know at the end of the lesson. Focus on important skills, strategies, conceptual understandings, knowledge, etc. Be sure to state the objectives in behavioral terms: How will you know the students learned what you taught?


Kid-friendly objectives use the language that students will be able to access in order to participate in their own learning. Students should be able to explain what they learning target is (in their own words) when asked. When students have the opportunity to articulate their progress towards the learning targets, this is called “student voice.”
Assessment

At the end of the lesson, what formal and informal indicators of student learning will you use that are aligned with your instructional objective/target? What will you hear and see students do that will let you know what students have understood and learned? How will you engage students in discussing and assessing their own learning?


Rationale

Why is this lesson important? How are the objectives/targets related to prior learning and/or future learning objectives?


Student Descriptions

What are these students’ strengths and funds of knowledge? What that the student already do well? What does the student already know? What is the student still learning to do? Where might more practice be necessary? What is important to consider about these students academically, socially, culturally, linguistically? How will this influence my planning and teaching?


Academic Language

What is the key academic language demand of this lesson? What kinds of supports will you need to include so that all learners can access the lesson through language? Identify vocabulary and also the students’ strengths and needs in relation to the language demands.


Materials/Technology Needed

What materials do I need? The students need? Are the materials appropriate for students’ different needs and for accomplishing the learning?


Instructional Plan

What instructional strategies, activities, and interactions will you use to enable students to meet the learning goals? How will you introduce the lesson and engage students? What vocabulary and academic language do the students need to know to succeed in this lesson? How will you model, explain, coach, demonstrate? How will you make the abstract concrete and the implicit explicit? What will the students say and do? How will they practice? How will you engage them in thinking and talking about their understanding and learning? How will you monitor student learning and provide feedback during the lesson? How will you close the lesson? How will students assess their learning?


Accommodations and Modifications

How have you adapted the lesson to meet learning needs of different students? Consider the needs of the whole class, individual learners with IEPs (and those without but with particular needs), ELL learners, and subgroups of learners that have been identified through your assessment analysis.


Reflection

How did the lesson work? What do you think students learned or did not learn? How was the lesson you planned different from what you actually taught? What might you change next time you teach this lesson? What do you need to reteach? What might be next lessons/learning’s for these students?



Menu of Co-teaching Strategies and Examples


STRATEGY

DEFINITION/EXAMPLE

One teach, one observe

One teacher has primary instructional responsibility while the other gathers specific observational information on students or the (instructing) teacher. The key to this strategy is to focus the observation – where the teacher doing the observation is observing specific behaviors. It is important to remember that either (teacher candidate or cooperating teacher) could take on both roles.
EXAMPLE: One teacher can observe students for their understanding of directions while the other leads.

Solo Teaching

Teacher candidate has primary instructional responsibility while the cooperating teacher might be working with individual/small group of students outside the classroom. The CT might also leave the classroom and return for debriefing afterwards (or at a convenient time).
EXAMPLE: The teacher candidate leads the class and videotapes while the CT leaves the room to follow up on student concern; later debriefs with TC by viewing portions of the video.

One teach, one drift

An extension of one teach, one observe. One teacher has primary instructional responsibility while the other assists students’ with their work, monitors behaviors, or corrects assignments. Often lending a voice to students or groups who would hesitate to participate or add comments.
EXAMPLE: While one teacher has the instructional lead, the person assisting can be the “voice” for the students when they don’t understand or are having difficulties.

Station Teaching

Co-teaching pair divide the instructional content into parts – Each teacher instructs one of the groups, groups then rotate or spend a designated amount of time at each station – often independent stations will be used along with the teacher led stations.
EXAMPLE: One teacher might lead a station where the students play a money game and the other teacher could have a mock store where students purchase items and make change.

Parallel Teaching

Each teacher instructs half the students. The two teachers are addressing the same instructional material, the greatest benefit to this approach is the reduction of students to teacher ratio.
Example: Both teachers are leading a question and answer discussion on specific current events and the impact they have on the economy.

Supplemental

This strategy allows one teacher to work with students at their expected grade level, while the other teacher works with those students who need the information and/or materials extended or remediated.
EXAMPLE: One teacher may work with students who need reteaching of a concept while the other teacher works with the rest of the students on enrichment.

Alternative (Differentiated)

Alternative teaching strategies provide two different approaches to teaching the same information. The learning outcome is the same for all students however the avenue for getting there is different.
EXAMPLE: One instructor may lead a group in predicting prior to reading by looking at the cover of the book and the illustrations, etc. The other instructor accomplishes the same outcome but with his/her group, the students predict by connecting the items pulled out of the bag with the story.

Team Teaching

Well planned, team-taught lessons, exhibit an invisible flow of instruction with no prescribed division of authority. Using a team teaching strategy, both teachers are actively involved in the lesson. From a students’ perspective, there is no clearly defined leader – as both teachers share the instruction, are free to interject information, and available to assist students and answer questions.
EXAMPLE: Both instructors can share the reading of a story or text so that the students are hearing two voices; both instructors can engage in a debate; taking opposing sides.

The strategies are not hierarchical – they can be used in any order and/or combined to best meet the needs of the student in the classroom.

Adapted from OSPI Assessment Conference (2010)



















Appendix A
Table 1: Alignment of Candidate Expectations with State and National Standards



TEP Program Themes

NTASC Standards

Standard V

a) content knowledge, pedagogy, assessment

The teacher understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline he or she teaches and can create learning experiences that make these aspects of subject matter meaningful for students. (Std 1)
The teacher understands how children learn and develop, and can provide learning opportunities that support a child’s intellectual, social, and personal development. (Std 2)

The teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage student development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills. (Std 4)
The teacher plans instruction based upon knowledge of subject matter, students, the community, and curriculum goals. (Std 7)

The teacher understands and uses formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and ensure the continuous intellectual, social, and physical development of the learner. (Std 8)

Standard 5.1: Knowledge of Subject Matter and Curriculum Goals
A. Content driven. All students develop understanding and problem-solving expertise in the content area(s) using reading, written and oral communication, and technology


B. Aligned with curriculum standards and outcomes. All students know the learning targets and their progress toward meeting them.

C. Integrated across content areas. All students learn subject matter content that integrates mathematical, scientific, and aesthetic reasoning.
Standard 5.2: Knowledge of Teaching
A. Informed by standards-based assessment. All students benefit from learning that is systematically analyzed using multiple formative, summative, and self-assessment strategies.
C. Influenced by multiple instructional strategies. All students benefit from personalized instruction that addresses their ability levels and cultural and linguistic backgrounds..
D. Informed by technology. All students benefit from instruction that utilizes effective technologies and is designed to create technologically proficient learners.

b) social relationships, and classroom management

The teacher uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation. (Std 5)

 

The teacher uses knowledge of effective verbal, nonverbal, and media communication techniques to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom. (Std 6)




5.3 B. Classroom/School centered. Student learning is connected to communities within the classroom and the school, including knowledge and skills for working with others.


c) student identity, language and culture

 The teacher understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners. (Std 3)

 

The teacher fosters relationships with school colleagues, parents, and agencies in the larger community to support students’ learning and well-being. (Std 10)



Standard 5.3: Knowledge of Learners and their Development in Social Contexts
A. Learner centered. All students engage in a variety of culturally responsive, developmentally, and age appropriate strategies.
B. Classroom/School centered. Student learning is connected to communities within the classroom and the school, including knowledge and skills for working with others.
C. Family/Neighborhood centered. Student learning is informed by collaboration with families and neighborhoods.
D. Contextual community centered. All students are prepared to be responsible citizens for an environmentally sustainable, globally interconnected, and diverse society.

d) equity and inclusion

The teacher understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners. (Std 3)


(5.3)B. Classroom/School centered. Student learning is connected to communities within the classroom and the school, including knowledge and skills for working with others.
C.Family/Neighborhood centered. Student learning is informed by collaboration with families and neighborhoods.
D. Contextual community centered. All students are prepared to be responsible citizens for an environmentally sustainable, globally interconnected, and diverse society.

e) inquiry, collaboration and professionalism

The teacher is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates the effects of his or her choices and actions on others and who actively seeks out opportunities to grow professionally. (Std 9)
The teacher fosters relationships with school colleagues, parents, and agencies in the larger community to support students’ learning and well-being. (Std 10)

Standard 5.4: Understanding Teaching as a Profession
A. Informed by professional responsibilities and policies. All students benefit from a collegial and professional school setting.
B. Enhanced by a reflective, collaborative, professional growth-centered practice. All students benefit from the professional growth of their teachers.
C. Informed by legal and ethical responsibilities. All students benefit from a safe and respectful learning environment.

Appendix B
CO-TEACHING WORKSHEET

Critical conversations to empower the best possible working relationship

Discuss the preferred method of communication for both of you--calls home, calls to cell phone, email, text, etc. Make sure you have each other’s information.




    • What works best for ongoing communication

(co-planning, scheduling, etc.)? _______________

    • What works best for last-minute notices such as illness? _______________

Discuss your parameters around the hours you work. Teaching Candidates are required to be at school during the CT’s contracted hours, and we have recommended that they follow each CT’s personal work hours. However, TCs do have a lot of coursework this quarter and teachers sometimes need time to catch up on work, so each pair will need to be in regular touch about the schedule.





    • Parameters discussed:

If you haven’t set a regular meeting time each week to plan and/or check in and reflect, please do so now.


    • DAY/TIME: _______________

Some CTs appreciate having a boundary around work time/quiet time in the classroom that is “interaction free.” Discuss and decide if this would be beneficial to you both.




    • Check when discussed: ________

For each CT: Aside from work time, what is sacred in your classroom in terms of routines, physical spaces, organization, etc.?




    • Notes from your discussion:

For each CT: Regarding daily lesson planning, discuss: 1) how much detail you need to see in the plan (keep in mind that the TC is required to use the elements listed in the handbook), and 2) how far in advance do you want to see lesson plans?


    • Notes from your discussion:

For each CT: If your TC wants to try a different instructional method or strategy, how does s/he go about it in your classroom? What are the boundaries within the curriculum and your own comfort level with this subject? Are there any “untouchables” in terms of revising the curriculum? Note: Faculty members and coaches will be at your table and can participate in this discussion.


    • Notes from our discussion:

For each CT: How do I access IEPs and any other plans in place to serve specific students in our class?




    • Notes from our discussion:

For each TC and CT: What is the ideal way for you to receive feedback? Do you prefer written notes, setting an official feedback time, or casual conversation?




    • Notes from our discussion:

Follow Up Questions



Appendix C

Video Waiver & Policy
The form on the next page is to be used to obtain parental permission for classroom video-taping during All Quarters.
During beginning Summer quarter, you will receive the UW COE policy on videotaping. Every candidate must read and sign a statement indicating that she or he has read and understands the policy. When you begin Autumn quarter you will re-do this form with a new set of children in a new school. If you have not received the written policy in Autumn, be sure to obtain it from the TEP office.

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON



SEATTLE, WASHINGTON 98195-3600

description: macintosh hd:users:joanlesh:desktop:downloadedfile.jpeg

Date ____________________


Dear Student and Family Members:

This letter is to provide you notice that students at __________________ (name of school) may be photographed and/or videotaped by a University of Washington teacher candidate. The purpose of the photographs and videos is to support candidates’ learning and preparation to become certified teachers during the course of the 2012-2013 school year. Video may also be used for the education of future teacher candidates and to improve teacher preparation at the University of Washington.

Video will also be used for the state-mandated Teacher Performance Assessment. All teachers certified in Washington after January 2013 must pass this national assessment. Video will be kept secure and only be accessible for assessment and learning purposes.

If you do not want videotapes of your child participating in classroom activities to be used for candidate learning and candidate performance assessment purposes, please sign and return the form below.

Sincerely,

Patrick Sexton, Managing Director, Teacher Education

College of Education, University of Washington

If you do NOT want your child to be photographed or videotaped, please complete this form and return it to your child’s teacher.



  • Please do not photograph or videotape my child while participating in classroom activities even if the photograph or videotape is to be used for candidate learning purposes.

______________________________________________

PRINT Child’s full name

_______________________________________________

PRINT Parent/Guardian’s full name

_______________________________________________

Parent/Guardian’s signature
Appendix D

Guide for Cooperating Teachers
Autumn Quarter

Things to make sure you model/discuss this quarter:


  • Planning—how you do it and how you’ll work with the TC to plan

  • How you use and adapt the grade-level curriculum

  • Make sure s/he knows the daily routines and how you transition from one to the next, as well as how you adapt the routine when there are assemblies, holiday parties, etc.

  • Assessments: both formal and informal—your classroom systems as well as the building, district and state systems

  • Grading—how you actually determine grades/scores as well as how your own record-keeping system works

  • Contact w/ parents

  • Working w/ parents and para-educators

  • Working w/ specialists

  • How you work w/ students on IEPs, ELL students

  • Individual behavior modification plans/contracts, if any

  • Teaching social skills in class/or working through individual social conflicts w/ students


Discussions to have:


  • How will the TC maintain or modify your classroom management system/style so that everyone is comfortable?

  • How do you decide how long to spend on a particular learning objective/concept before you move on?

  • Share practical tricks you’ve developed for adapting lessons and activities so that the range of all learning needs are being met.

  • How do you find balance and maintain your personal life while still being successful in this demanding job?


Later in the Quarter…Specific things to watch for as your TC teaches: (add to this!)


  • What habits might be developing—like calling the students “guys” (often the interns are unaware of these)

  • Style of communication with the students (for example: too positive/cheerleader, shaming, etc.)

  • PACING—how to know when to move on to the next segment of your lesson

  • Clarity of instruction

  • Good use of questioning skills

  • Ability to adapt to student feedback and incorporate it into “teaching moments.”

  • Classroom management—what works and what doesn’t. Pay particular attention to targeting of certain students

Appendix E

**The following checklists can be used by CTs, colleagues and administrators for informal observations. Feel free to use them in whatever way works for you!


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