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TRAINING AND EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS:


  1. Training. Training may be conducted in the aircraft or CSMET.

  2. Evaluation. Evaluation will be conducted in the aircraft.
  • REFERENCE: Appropriate common references plus FM 1-140.


    1. 1470

      1. PERFORM REFUEL/REARM OPERATIONS
    1. CONDITIONS: In an OH-58D helicopter.

    2. STANDARDS: Appropriate common standards plus the following:


      1. Ensure that refueling procedures are performed IAW SOP’s and local directives.

      2. Ensure that rearming procedures are performed IAW SOP’s and local directives.
    3. DESCRIPTION:


      1. Crew actions.

            1. The PC will verify that the proper types and quantities of ordnance are loaded to meet the mission profile. Once refueled or rearmed, the PC will determine if there will be any limita­tions imposed on the flight as a result of the ordnance and fuel loads. When IGE power is available, the PC will ensure another hover power check is performed after rearm/refuel checking CG, controllability.

            2. The P* will position the aircraft to the refueling point. He will perform refuel and rearm procedures.

            3. The P will call out the applicable refuel and rearm checks and items required by unit SOP. He will monitor the aircraft position and will provide adequate warning for obstacle avoidance.

      2. Procedures. Ensure that FARP personnel properly ground and refuel the aircraft. Ensure that the tank is filled to the required level. When the refueling is completed, ensure that the cap is secured and grounding cables removed. Ensure coordination between crewmembers and armament personnel prior to manipulating weapons switches during continuity checks, stray voltage checks and when loading the 50-caliber machine gun. Make appropriate logbook entries.

    1. Risk assessment must be factored in the mission briefing when hot rearm/refuel is to be accomplished.
    1. NIGHT OR NVG CONSIDERATIONS: Supplement aircraft lighting at the refueling station by using an explosion-proof flashlight with an unfiltered lens to check for leaks and fuel venting.

    2. TRAINING AND EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS:


      1. Training. Training will be conducted in the aircraft.

      2. Evaluation. Evaluation will be conducted in the aircraft.
    3. REFERENCES: Appropriate common references plus FM 1-140.


    1. 1472

      1. OPERATE NIGHT VISION GOGGLES (ANVIS)
    1. CONDITIONS: In an OH‑58D helicopter.

    2. STANDARDS: Appropriate common standards plus the following:


      1. Perform PM and operational checks on the ANVIS.

      2. Operate the aircraft NVG power supply.
    3. DESCRIPTION:


      1. Crew Actions.

            1. The P* is responsible for clearing the aircraft and obstacle avoidance.

            2. The P will announce when his attention is focused inside the cockpit. Upon completion of the ANVIS checks and adjustments he will announce the status of his goggles.

      2. Procedures.

            1. Before flight, perform PM and operational checks on the ANVIS according to instructions in TM 11‑5855‑263‑10.

            2. Perform NVG power supply self test. Connect the battery pack to the aircraft's NVG power supply. Ensure the ANVIS are operational. Remove batteries form the battery pack. The ANVIS should remain operational. A crew briefing should be conducted prior to NVG operations, crew coordination is crucial. Transfer of controls should be covered in detail. When maneuvering the aircraft the P* must consider obstacles and other aircraft. The P should announce when his attention is focused inside or outside the cockpit. He should ensure that the P* maintains his attention outside the cockpit.
    4. TRAINING AND EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS:


      1. Training. Training will be conducted in the aircraft.

      2. Evaluation. Evaluation will be conducted in the aircraft.
    5. REFERENCES: Appropriate common references plus TM 11‑5855‑263‑10.


    1. 1474

      1. RESPOND TO NVD FAILURE
    1. CONDITIONS: In an OH‑58D helicopter given an academic or a visual cue that the NVG have failed.

    2. STANDARDS: Appropriate common standards plus the following:


      1. Identify or describe indications of impending NVG failure.

      2. Perform or describe emergency procedures for NVG failure.
    3. DESCRIPTION: Impending NVG failure may be indicated by illumina­tion of the 30‑minute low‑voltage warning indicator. It also may be indicated by one or both tubes flickering or blanking.


      1. Crew Actions.

            1. The P* will remain focused out side the aircraft. He is responsible for clearing the aircraft and obstacle avoidance. If the P*’s NVGs fail or indicate impending failure, he will announce goggle failure. Transfer the controls to the P.

            2. If the P’s NVGs fail or indicate impending failure, he will announce goggle failure. Switch batteries or troubleshoot the goggles. If the NVGs are not restored to operation make the appropriate report and modify the mission as briefed.

      2. Procedures.

            1. During NOE or contour flight. Immediately announce "goggle failure" and begin a climb at a rate that will ensure obstacle avoidance. Transfer the flight controls if necessary, discontinue the mission and attempt to restore the goggles. If NVGs are restored, continue the mission. If not restored, lock the NVGs in the up posi­tion and proceed as briefed.

            2. During low‑level flight or flight conducted at higher altitude, use the procedure described above. A climb is not required.

    1. NVG tube failure is infrequent and usually provides ample warning. Only occasionally will a tube fail completely in a short time. Rarely will both tubes fail at the same time. There is no remedy for in‑flight tube failure.
    1. TRAINING AND EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS:


      1. Training. Training will be conducted in the aircraft.

      2. Evaluation. Evaluation will be conducted in the aircraft.
    2. REFERENCES: Appropriate common references plus TM 11‑5855‑263‑10.


    1. 1548

      1. TRANSMIT TACTICAL REPORTS
    1. CONDITIONS: In an OH‑58D helicopter and given sufficient information to compile a tactical report.

    2. STANDARDS: Appropriate common standards plus the following:


      1. Transmit appropriate report using proper format.
    3. DESCRIPTION:


      1. Crew actions.

            1. The P* is responsible for aircraft control, and obstacle avoidance. He will coordinate with the P as to who will make the report.

            2. The P will prepare the information for the report and coordinate with the P* prior to sending it. He will assist in clearing the aircraft and obstacle avoidance as duties permit.

      2. Procedures. Reports must be timely, and concise. To save time, reduce confusion, and ensure complete­ness, information should be reported according to an established format. Standard formats for four different types of reports are given below.

            1. Spot report. A spot report is used to report infor­mation about the enemy and area of operations.

          1. Call sign of observer.

          2. SALUTE.

            1. S‑‑size.

            2. A‑‑activity.

            3. L‑‑location.

            4. U‑‑unit (if known).

            5. T‑‑time.

            6. E‑‑equipment.

          3. What you are doing about it.

            1. Battle damage assessment. Submit a BDA following naval gunfire, artillery fire (if requested), or a tactical air strike.



    ALPHA: Call sign of observing source.

    BRAVO: Location of target.

    CHARLIE: Time strike started and ended.

    DELTA: Percentage of target coverage (pertains to the percentage of projectiles

    that hit the target area).

    ECHO: Itemized destruction.


    FOXTROT: Remarks. May be omitted; however, they may contain additional information such as the direction the enemy may have taken in leaving the target area.


            1. Enemy shelling, bombing, or NBC warfare activity report. Submit this report following enemy shell­ing, bombing, or NBC warfare activity.

    ALPHA: From (unit call sign) and type of re­port.
    BRAVO: Position of observer (grid coordinates in code).
    CHARLIE: Azimuth of flash, sound, or groove of shell (state which) or origin of flight path of missile.
    DELTA: Time from (date‑time of attack).
    ECHO: Time to (for illumination time).
    FOXTROT: Area attacked (either azimuth and dis­tance from observer in code or grid coor­dinates in the clear).
    GOLF: Number and nature of guns, mortars, air­craft, or other means of delivery, if known.
    HOTEL: Nature of fire (barrage, registration, and so on) or NBC‑1 type of burst (air or surface) or type of toxic agent.
    INDIA: Number and type of bombs, shells, rock­ets, and so on.
    JULIETT: Flash‑to‑bang time in seconds.
    KILO: If NBC‑1, damage (in code) or crater diam­eter.
    LIMA: If NBC‑1, fireball width immediately after shock wave (do not report if data was obtained more than five minutes after detonation).
    MIKE: If NBC‑1, cloud height (state top or bot­tom) ten minutes after burst.
    NOVEMBER: If NBC‑1, cloud width ten minutes after burst.


    1. State units of measure used, such as meters or miles. For additional information, see FM 3‑100. As a minimum, an NBC‑1 report requires lines A, B, C, D, H, and J and either L or M.

            1. Meaconing, intrusion, jamming, and interference report. Once jamming is discovered, report the interference as soon as practicable to higher headquarters.

              Line 1: Type of report (meaconing, intrusion, jam­ming, or interference).
              Line 2: Affected unit (call sign and suffix).
              Line 3: Location (your grid location).
              Line 4: Frequency affected (frequen­cy).
              Line 5: Type of equipment affected (UHF, VHF, FM, and so on).
              Line 6: Type of interference (type of jamming and signal).
              Line 7: Strength of interference (strong, medium, or weak).
              Line 8: Time interference started and stopped (if continuing, so state).
              Line 9: Effectiveness of interference (estimate percent of transmission blockage).
              Line 10: Operator's name and rank.
              Line 11: Remarks (list anything else that may be helpful in identifying or locating source of interference, and send it to higher head­quarters by an alternate, secure means).

    1. NIGHT OR NVG CONSIDERATIONS: A thorough crew briefing should be conducted prior to NVG operations, crew coordination is crucial. When maneuvering the aircraft to maintain the MMS on target the P* must consider obstacles and other aircraft. The P should momentarily assist the P* with obstacle avoidance and clearing the aircraft and announce when doing so.

    2. TRAINING AND EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS:


      1. Training. Training may be conducted in the aircraft or academically.

      2. Evaluation. Evaluation may be conducted in the aircraft or academically.
    3. REFERENCES: Appropriate common references plus FM 3‑100, and FM 34‑1.


    1. 2010

      1. PERFORM FORMATION FLIGHT
    1. CONDITIONS: In an OH‑58D helicopter, given a unit SOP.

    2. STANDARDS: Appropriate common standards plus the following.


      1. Brief the flight.

      2. Perform formation flight as briefed.
    3. DESCRIPTION:


      1. Crew actions.

            1. The P* will focus primarily outside the aircraft, keeping track of other aircraft on the route of flight. He will announce any maneuver or movement before execution and inform the P if visual contact is lost with other aircraft. He will execute IMC breakup as briefed.

            2. The P will provide adequate warning of traffic or obstacles detected in the flight path and identified on the map. He will assist in maintaining aircraft separation. He will inform the P* if visual contact is lost with other aircraft, and if threat elements are detected or sighted. He will perform duties as briefed. He will notify the P* when his attention is focused inside the aircraft.

      2. Procedures. As briefed, maneuver into the flight formation, changing position as required. Maintain horizontal and vertical separation for the type of formation being flown. If the tactical situation requires, perform techniques of movement as briefed.

    1. The P* must keep the P thoroughly informed to what he is observing and doing throughout the formation flight or multiship operation. The P should frequently assist the P* by communicating his situational awareness perceptions and formation/multiship observations. Additionally the P should assist P* by monitoring aircraft systems operating the NAV system, and scanning the air route for possible intruders or other hazards and obstacles to the integrity and security of the flight.
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