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TRAINING AND EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS:


  1. Training. Training may be conducted in the OH-58D(R) helicopter. Only the following maneuvers may be performed while conducting FADEC Manual mode training/evaluations: Hovering flight (IGE only), VMC takeoff, VMC flight maneuvers, and VMC approach.

  2. Evaluation. Evaluation will be conducted in the aircraft. Proficiency in each of the training tasks should be assessed.
  • REFERENCES: Appropriate common references.


    1. 1118

      1. PERFORM TARGET HANDOVER
    1. CONDITIONS: In an OH‑58D helicopter.

    2. STANDARDS: Appropriate common standards plus the following:


      1. Use the proper communications procedure to accomplish a target handover to an attack helicopter.
    3. DESCRIPTION:


      1. Crew actions.

            1. The P* is responsible for aircraft control, and obstacle avoidance. He will coordinate with the P as to who will make the handover.

            2. The P may use the MMS to locate and identify the target. He will prepare the information for the handover and coordinate with the P* prior to sending it. He will assist in clearing the aircraft and obstacle avoidance as duties permit.

      2. Procedures.

            1. Target handover voice (not shooting/designating). The standard elements for target handover, voice engagement are--

          1. Alert and target description. This alerts the attack aircrew that a target handover is about to occur. It identifies the sender and describes the target (type, number, and activity); for example, "K13, this is K06 Target. Three tanks moving west."

          2. Target location. Gives the direction to the target in degrees and range from the battle position. It may reference from a known point (for example, the target refer­ence line or the engagement area), use grid coordinates, or spot with a laser. An example is "120 degrees at 2,800 meters" or "offset left 030 degrees (code)."

          3. Attack method. Describes the planned scheme of maneuver, fire distribution, and maneuver for the attack; for example, "Attack targets west of north‑south road."

          4. Execution. Gives the command to initiate the attack. The two commands are as follows.

            1. At my command. The attack aircrew engages when commanded to "fire."

            2. When ready. The attack aircrew fires when ready.

          5. Post attack method. The attack aircrew unmasks to evaluate the effect on the target and begins planning subse­quent engagements. They describe ingress and egress routes for new positions; for example, "Move to holding area 4; on order, attack from battle position 21."

            1. Target handover voice (remote designator). The standard elements for remote voice engagements are as follows.

          6. Alert and target description. This consists of the same information described in a(1) above, except the word "remote" is included in the transmission. An example is "B29, this is B4 Remote. Three tanks moving southwest."

          7. Target location. May reference from a laser target line if the designator position is unknown or use grid coordinates; for example, "Engagement area DOG, 030 de­grees."

          8. Attack method. This includes the delivery mode, number of rounds, the laser code, if needed, and the time interval as appropriate.

          9. Execution. This tells when and how the attack is to be initiated. Remote missions are always "at my command."

    1. The P*/P should not give a fire command until he receives a "ready" message from the attack aircrew.

          1. Post-attack method. See a(5) above.

            1. Digital engagements. The proce­dure for a digital engagement, ATHS/IDM is as follows.

          2. After locating the target with the LRF/D and verifying the grid coordinates, enter the appropriate mission request and transmit it to the attack aircrew.

          3. After receiving the appropriate message from the attack aircrew, send the fire command. Lase the target if required. When the target is neutralized, send an "end of mission" message with a BDA or an "unable to observe" message.

    1. If another target is located in the same area, an additional missile can be fired if the designator transmits "REPEAT, OVER" to the launching aircraft. If more than one additional missile is desired, the call should include the number of missiles, i.e. "REPEAT, THREE MISSILES, OVER".
    1. TRAINING AND EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS:


      1. Training. Training may be conducted in the aircraft, CPT, CSMET or academically.

      2. Evaluation. Evaluation will be conducted in the aircraft.
    2. REFERENCES: Appropriate common references.




    SAMPLE REMOTE HELLFIRE REQUEST - VOICE

    1. ALERT: THIS IS: "REMOTE, OVER"!


    TARGET DESCRIPTION:_____________________________________________________
    2. LOCATION:

    (GRID or DISTANCE & BEARING)


    3. ATTACK METHOD:
    a. DELIVERY MODE: ___________________________________________________
    b. NUMBER OF MISSILES :_______________________________________________
    c. LASER CODE:
    d. TIME INTERVAL BETWEEN MISSILES:
    4. "AT MY COMMAND" (UNLESS STATED OTHERWISE)
    THE FIRING AIRCRAFT SHOULD EVALUATE THE REQUEST AND RESPOND TO THE DESIGNATING AIRCRAFT WITH:

    THIS IS ,"ACCEPT" or "REJECT", "OVER".


    IF ACCEPTED, THE FIRING AIRCRAFT MUST POSITION ITSELF AS NECESSARY TO MAKE THE SHOT, OBTAIN FIRING CONSTRAINTS, AND RESPOND WITH:

    THIS IS , "READY. TIME OF FLIGHT 45", "OVER".


    WHEN THE DESIGNATING AIRCRAFT IS READY FOR THE MISSILE, IT WILL RESPOND WITH:

    THIS IS , "FIRE", "OVER".


    THE FIRING AIRCRAFT SHOULD RESPOND WITH: "SHOT", "OVER".
    DESIGNATING AIRCRAFT SHOULD "LASE" THE TARGET UNTIL IMPACT OR FOR 20 SECONDS BEYOND THE EXPECTED MISSILE TIME ON TARGET


    Figure 4-4. SAMPLE REMOTE HELLFIRE REQUEST - VOICE

    1. 1145

      1. PERFORM TERRAIN FLIGHT TAKEOFF
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