Table of contents introduction



Download 1.63 Mb.
Page22/50
Date conversion08.07.2018
Size1.63 Mb.
1   ...   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   ...   50

TRAINING AND EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS:


  1. Training. Training will be conducted in the aircraft.

  2. Evaluation. Evaluation will be conducted in the aircraft.
  • REFERENCES: Appropriate common references.


    1. 1044

      1. NAVIGATE BY PILOTAGE AND DEAD RECKONING
    1. CONDITIONS: In an OH-58D helicopter, given the appropriate maps, plotter, flight computer, and flight log.

    2. STANDARDS: Appropriate common standards plus the following:


      1. Maintain orientation within ¼ mile or 400 meters.

      2. Arrive at checkpoints/destination ±3 minutes of ETA.
    3. DESCRIPTION:


      1. Crew actions.

            1. The P* will acknowledge commands issued by the P for the heading, altitude and airspeed changes necessary to navigate the desired course. The P* will announce significant surface features to assist in navigation.

            2. The P will direct the P* to change aircraft heading and airspeed as appropriate to navigate the desired course. The P will use rally terms, specific headings, relative bearings, or key terrain features in accomplishing this task. He will announce all plotted hazards prior to approaching their location. The P, as his workload permits, he will assist in clearing the aircraft and will provide adequate warning to avoid traffic and obstacles.

      2. Procedures. After obtaining current weather forecasts, plan the flight by marking the route and appropriate checkpoints. Compute the time, distance and heading for each leg of the flight. Use both pilotage and dead reckoning to maintain the position of the aircraft along a planned route. Perform a ground speed check as soon as possible by computing the actual time required to fly a known distance. Adjust estimated times for subsequent legs of the route using actual ground speed. Determine correction for winds, if neces­sary, so that the airspeed or ground speed and heading can be computed for the remaining legs of the flight. Make heading corrections to maintain the desired course (ground track).
    4. NIGHT OR NVG CONSIDERATIONS: More detailed flight planning is required when the flight is conducted at terrain flight altitudes, when visibility is reduced, or in the night or NVG environment. TC 1-204 contains details about night and NVG navigation. Interior cockpit lighting should be considered when selecting colors for preparing navigational aids; for example, maps and knee board notes. Select prominent terrain features as turning points and barriers.

    5. TRAINING AND EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS:


      1. Training. Training will be conducted in the aircraft.

      2. Evaluation. Evaluation will be conducted in the aircraft.
    6. REFERENCES: Appropriate common references.


    1. 1046

      1. PERFORM ELECTRONICALLY AIDED NAVIGATION
    1. CONDITIONS: In an OH‑58D helicopter.

    2. STANDARDS: Appropriate common standards plus the following:


      1. Prepare the navigation system for operation.

      2. Align and update the system as required.
    3. DESCRIPTION:


      1. Crew actions.

            1. The PC will assign NAV program­ming/verification duties.

            2. The P* or P will perform route navigation and position verification as required. The P* will fly the programmed navigation course using appropriate navigation cues provided through the MFD. The P* will acknowledge and verify the new navigation heading.

            3. The P will announce all navigation destination changes and verify the heading.

    1. Only the P will perform in-flight time/labor intensive NAV programming duties. Whenever possible, the P should perform most NAV programming duties.

      1. Procedures. During pre-mission planning, the crewmembers determine the navigation data required for entry into the system. Use the WAYPOINT and FLIGHT PLAN pages or AMPS to enter the required waypoints and construct the flight plan. During air­craft run‑up, access the NAV ALIGN page and enter the appropriate data. Operate the navigation system IAW the Operator's Manual.

    1. When the mission dictates single‑pilot operation, the above duties are performed by the P*.
    1. TRAINING AND EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS:


      1. Training. Training may be conducted in the aircraft, CPT or CSMET.

      2. Evaluation. Evaluation will be conducted in the aircraft.
    2. REFERENCES: Appropriate common references.


    1. 1048

      1. PERFORM FUEL MANAGEMENT PROCEDURES
    1. CONDITIONS: In an OH-58D helicopter.

    2. STANDARDS: Appropriate common standards plus the following:


      1. Verify that the required amount of fuel is on board at the time of takeoff.

      2. Perform an in‑flight fuel consumption check 30 to 60 minutes after level off or entry into mission profile.

      3. Initiate an alternate course of action if actual fuel consumption varies from the planning value and the flight cannot be completed with the required reserve.

      4. Monitor fuel quantity and consumption rate during the flight.
    3. DESCRIPTION:


      1. Crew actions.

            1. The PC will brief fuel management responsibilities before takeoff. He will initiate an alternate course of action during the flight if the actual fuel consumption varies from the planning value and the flight cannot be completed with the required reserve.

            2. The P* will acknowledge the results of the fuel check.

            3. The P will record initial fuel figures, fuel flow computation, and burnout and reserve times. He will announce when he initiates and completes the fuel check. The P will announce the results of the fuel check.

      2. Procedures.

            1. Before‑takeoff fuel check. Determine the total fuel on board, and compare it with mission fuel requirements deter­mined during premission planning. If the fuel on board is inadequate, have the aircraft refueled or abort/revise the mission.

            2. Initial airborne fuel reading. After the aircraft has leveled off or entered mission profile and appropriate power is set, record the total fuel quantity and the time of reading.

            3. Fuel consumption check. With the aircraft in mis­sion/­cruise profile, 30 to 60 minutes after performing the initial airborne fuel reading, record the remaining fuel and time of reading. Compute and record the rate of consumption, burnout, and reserve entry time. Determine if the remaining fuel is sufficient to complete the flight with the required reserve. If the fuel quantity is inadequate, initiate an alternate course of action.

            4. Fuel quantity and consumption. Periodically monitor the fuel quantity and consumption rate. If the fuel quantity or flow indicates a deviation from computed values, repeat the fuel consumption check to determine if the fuel quantity is adequate to com­plete the flight.
  • 1   ...   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   ...   50


    The database is protected by copyright ©dentisty.org 2016
    send message

        Main page