Table of Contents Chapter 1: Introduction



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University Of Minnesota

Department of _________________

Laboratory Safety Plan

Last Updated:



Table of Contents
Chapter 1: Introduction …………………………………………………………3

    1. Purpose ……………………………………………………………………...3

    2. Scope and Application ……………………………………………………...3

    3. Coordination with Other standards and guidelines …………………………4

    4. Roles and Responsibilities ………………………………………………….4



Chapter 2: Standard Operating Procedures (SOP’s) ………………………….8

2.1 Chemical procedures ………………………………………………………..8

2.2 Biohazard procedures ……………………………………………………….10

2.3 Radioactive procedures ……………………………………………………..11

2.4 Other lab safety procedures …………………………………………………11

2.5 Lab specific SOP’s ………………………………………………………….12

2.6 General emergency procedures ……………………………………………...12

2.7 Planning for shutdown ………………………………………………………13


Chapter 3: How to reduce Exposures to Hazardous Chemicals ………………14

3.1 Engineering controls ………………………………………………………...14

3.2 Personal Protective Equipment ………………………………………………15

3.3 Hygiene Practices ……………………………………………………………17

3.4 Administrative controls ……………………………………………………...17
Chapter 4: Management of Chemical Fume hoods and other Protective

Equipment ……………………………………………………………19

4.1 Fume Hoods …………………………………………………………………19

4.2 Biological safety cabinets …………………………………………………... 19

4.3 Eye wash and showers ………………………………………………………20

4.4 Fire extinguishers ……………………………………………………………20

4.5 New systems …………………………………………………………………20

4.6 Routine Inspections ……………………………………………………….…20
Chapter 5: Employee Information and Training ……………………………….21

5.1 Training requirements ……………………………………………………….21

5.2 Training content ……………………………………………………………..22

5.3 Training updates ……………………………………………………………..23

5.4 Access to pertinent safety information ………………………………………23
Chapter 6: Required Approvals ………………………………………………….24
Chapter 7: Medical Consultation and Examination ……………………………25

7.1 Employees working with Hazardous substances ……………………………25

7.2 Medical Examinations and Consultations …………………………………...25

7.3 Workers’ Compensation procedures and forms ………………………….….26

7.4 Information provided to Physicians …………………………………………27

7.5 Information provided to University of Minnesota …………………………..27


Chapter 8: Personnel ……………………………………………………………..28
Chapter 9: Additional Employee Protection for work with Particularly Hazardous Substances ……………………………………………….29
Chapter 10: Record keeping, Review and Updates ………………………………30

10.1 Record keeping ………………………………………………………………30

10.2 Review and update of Lab Safety Plan ……………………………………....31

Table 1: Poisonous Gases ……………………………………………………….32

Table 2: Shock Sensitive Chemicals ……………………………………………33
Table 3: Pyrophoric Chemicals …………………………………………………35
Table 4: Peroxide Forming Chemicals ………………………………………….36
Table 5: Carcinogens, Reproductive Toxins and highly Toxic Chemicals ……..38

Note to PI’s


  1. Identify and update the hazards and list the hazardous substances used in your laboratory in the appropriate section of the LSP

  2. Ensure that each hazardous substance used in your laboratory has Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) that are easily accessible to all personnel and students working with those substances and that they are properly labeled

  3. Ensure that all personnel working in the laboratory are compliant by conducting lab audits and providing necessary training


Chapter 1 – Introduction
1.1 Purpose

In 1990, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) released a regulation entitled, Occupational Exposures to Hazardous Chemicals in the Laboratory (29 CFR 1910.1450), commonly referred to as the "Laboratory Safety Standard".


This Laboratory Safety Plan (LSP) is intended to meet the requirements of the federal Laboratory Safety Standard. It describes policies, procedures, equipment, personal protective equipment and work practices that are capable of protecting employees from the health hazards in laboratories. All laboratory workers must be made aware of this plan. New employees must review the plan and receive safety training before beginning work in the laboratory. The plan must be available to all laboratory workers at all times.
This LSP also addresses the concerns of the federal Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA). TSCA requires that prudent laboratory practices be developed and documented for research involving new chemicals that have not had their health and environmental hazards fully characterized. Laboratories engaged in research must consider the applicability of TSCA on their operation. TSCA, administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the New Chemicals Program, is intended to ensure that the human health and environmental effects of chemical substances are identified and adequately addressed prior to commercial use or transport of those substances. A new chemical is a chemical substance that is produced or imported and not yet listed on the TSCA Chemical Substance Inventory. Each laboratory or research group that synthesizes or imports new chemicals must determine if and how TSCA applies to their laboratory activities – see Appendix A.
1.2 Scope and Application

DSO’s – note and delete: In this section, specify which college or department or division is covered by this Laboratory Safety Plan. Also include a list of Principal Investigators, the locations of their laboratories, and a phrase describing the type of research occurring in that area (see Table below).
The Laboratory Safety Standard applies where 'laboratory use' of hazardous chemicals occurs. Laboratory use of hazardous chemicals means handling or use of such chemicals in which all of the following conditions are met:


  1. the handling or use of chemicals occurs on a 'laboratory scale', that is, the work involves containers which can easily and safely be manipulated by one person,

  2. multiple chemical procedures or chemical substances are used, and

  3. protective laboratory practices and equipment are available and in common use to minimize the potential for employee exposures to hazardous chemicals.

At a minimum, this definition covers employees (including student employees, technicians, supervisors, lead researchers and physicians) who use chemicals in teaching, research and clinical laboratories at the University of Minnesota. Certain non-traditional laboratory settings may be included under this standard at the option of individual departments within the University. Also, it is the policy of the University that laboratory students, while not legally covered under this standard, will be given training commensurate with the level of hazard associated with their laboratory work.


This standard does not apply to laboratories whose function is to produce commercial quantities of material. Also, where the use of hazardous chemicals provides no potential for employee exposure, such as in procedures using chemically impregnated test media and commercially prepared test kits, this standard will not apply. The researchers listed in the following table are covered by this Laboratory Safety Plan.


Principal Investigator

Building

Room #

Primary Research Hazards

E- mail

Phone #

























































1.3 Coordination with Other Standards and Guidelines

DSO’s note and delete: Several other University standards and state and federal rules pertain to activities carried out in research laboratories at the University. Ask each PI to check the regulations listed in Appendix B, and contact DEHS for more information on any standard that may apply to the laboratory operations.
The Laboratory Safety Standard addresses occupational safety issues for employees who work with hazardous chemicals in laboratories. Other federal, state and local standards that address use of hazardous chemicals and other materials are listed in Appendix B.
1.4 Roles and Responsibilities

DSO’s – note and delete: Tailor this section, identifying by name the administrators, deans, department heads, Departmental Safety Officers, etc. who have responsibility for the unit covered in the Laboratory Safety Plan (as identified in Section 1.B. Scope and Application).

Employees, supervisors, Departmental Safety Officers, department heads, deans, upper administrative staff, and DEHS staff all have roles to play. These roles are outlined below.




  1. President, Vice Presidents, Provosts and Chancellors (Central Administration)

Upper level administrators are responsible for:

  • Actively promote the importance of safety in the research community;

  • Ensure deans, directors and department heads provide adequate time and recognition for employees who are given laboratory safety responsibilities.

    • Objectively evaluate direct reports on their safety involvement and continuous improvement efforts.



  1. Deans, Associate Deans, Directors and Department Heads

  • Actively promote the importance of safety in the research community;

  • Support and participate in safety improvement efforts;

  • Establish collegiate, departmental or institute based safety committees or other effective means to facilitate continuous safety improvement;

  • Monitor the effectiveness of safety improvement efforts;

  • Ensure PIs and Lab Directors provide adequate time and recognition for employees who are given laboratory safety responsibilities;

  • Identify an appropriate number of technically-qualified Departmental Safety Officers (DSO) for the unit. Colleges or institutes made up of a number of large laboratory-based departments are urged to assign Departmental Safety Officers within each department or division;

  • Ensure that the designated DSO and safety committees have dedicated time and resources to carry out their assigned responsibilities;

  • Establish and maintain processes to ensure the DSOs are informed of new and changing faculty space assignments, including faculty leaving the University

  • Objectively evaluate direct reports on their safety involvement and continuous improvement efforts.



  1. Supervisors/Principal Investigators

Immediate supervisors of laboratory employees are responsible for:

  • Assure potential hazards of specific projects have been identified and addressed before work is started;

    • Ensure effective safe operating procedures are completed for lab activities involving high hazard materials and activities;

    • Identify and provide necessary safety supplies and personal protective equipment:

    • Discuss and reinforce safe work practices and PPE use, provide coaching and disciplinary action as necessary;

    • Conduct continuous inspection of the research space under the supervisors control, ensure that unsafe conditions are identified and corrected;

    • Ensure that all accidents, injuries, and spills are reported to DEHS;

    • Investigate laboratory incidents, identify root causes, and implement appropriate solutions;

  • Actively participate in safety improvement efforts;

  • Provide initial and annual update training for lab workers regarding hazards in their area and associated with their work;

    • Maintain documentation of initial and annual training to laboratory personnel

    • Objectively evaluate direct reports on their safety involvement and continuous improvement efforts.




  1. Employees

Employees who have significant responsibility for directing their own laboratory work are responsible for assuring that potential hazards of specific projects have been identified and addressed before work is started. All laboratory employees however, are responsible to:

  • Complete required safety training;

  • Read and understand lab standard operating procedures;

  • Follow safe work practices applicable to the procedures being carried out;

  • Actively identify, report, implement, and make suggestions for safety improvements;

  • Assure required safety precautions are in place before work is started;

  • Follow University lab dress code and wear PPE required for procedures;

  • Notify DEHS of accidents, spills or conditions that may warrant further investigation and/or monitoring.



  1. Departmental Safety Officer

The DSO:

  • serves as liaison and facilitates communication between employing department and DEHS;

  • coordinates training to ensure researchers understand their responsibilities and the policies applicable to their research;

  • schedules and participates in inspections of laboratories (in conjunction with departmental safety committees and DEHS);

  • Assists in facilitating follow-up on improvement recommendations

  • notifies DEHS of new or existing operations that may warrant further investigation and/or monitoring;

  • Participate on or facilitates departmental safety committees.




  1. Department of Environmental Health and Safety (DEHS)

  • Develop centralized processes and safety management systems to assist Colleges and Departments to fulfill their safety responsibilities.

  • Provide technical resources and expertise to Colleges and Departments to help facilitate continuous safety improvement.

  • Conduct periodic inspections and audits to verify implementation of safety management systems and safe work practices.

  • Maintain written safety performance expectations and guidance in the form of a Research Safety Manual or other written materials.

  • Provide educational information and training assistance to departments and colleges relative to hazard identification and safe work practice.

  • Participate on and provide guidance to safety committees or other safety improvement mechanisms.

  • Identify and share best practices across departments and colleges.




  1. Safety Committees (or other Departmental or Collegiate safety improvement mechanisms).




  • Maintain a working knowledge of their work areas, are interested in safety improvement, and visible advocates for safety.

  • Evaluate and improve departmental and collegiate safety cultures.

  • Identify high-risk job tasks and promote the development of safe work practices.

  • Identify and share best practices across the Department or College

  • Identify the need for written programs and recommend implementation to department or college leadership.

  • Committees have access to, and regular communications with, departmental and collegiate leadership through clearly defined reporting mechanisms.

  • Promote and facilitate safety training

  • Participate in periodic safety audits and inspections.

  • Solicit reports of unsafe conditions and suggest corrective actions.

  • Review incidents, near misses, accident investigation reports.

  • Review potential serious injuries and incidents. Not for fault finding, but for fact finding to prevent a re-occurrence of the same or similar incident.

  • Review injury and incident data for trends.

  • Establish departmental and collegiate goals for safety improvement.


Chapter 2 – Laboratory Safety Procedures
DSOs note and delete: Subsections 1, 2, and 3 present the topic headings for the detailed Standard Operating Procedures already included in Appendices D, E, and F. Ask PI’s to review these subsections and appendices and train staff on all the SOPs which pertain to the chemicals and procedures used in the laboratory. Work with particularly hazardous or unique chemicals and/or procedures may not be covered by the SOPs listed below. In this case, the PI must ensure the researchers follow written SOPs that describe the work to be conducted, and the safety measures to mitigate any hazards. Procedures and written safety precautions included in laboratory notebooks may serve as laboratory-specific SOPs. Ensure the PI’s keep these individual SOPs in the laboratory and train employees on their contents.
This chapter gives general guidance for working safely in laboratories. Using this section in conjunction with other safety references will help researchers maintain a safe laboratory. This chapter also has information which will help researchers prepare laboratory-specific Safe Operating Procedures (SOPs).
2.1 Chemical Procedures

A. Controlled Substances and Alcohol

In conducting research with controlled substances, University authorized employees must comply with federal and state laws and regulations regarding their uses, including registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), storage requirements, inventory maintenance and substance disposal. A condensed guide to federal regulations as well as policies and forms pertaining to controlled substances are available on the Controlled Substances webpage.


Ethyl alcohol used for education, scientific research, or medicinal purposes can be purchased tax-free through University Stores (www.ustores.umn.edu), which holds the University of Minnesota site license for alcohol purchases with the Federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms. Further information and links to the ordering form are available at the following link: Tax Free Alcohol Ordering Procedures.

B. Labeling Chemicals in the Laboratory

All chemicals in the laboratory are required to have a label that indicates chemical contents and hazard warnings. Chemicals purchased from a manufacturer will have labels from that manufacturer that meet the chemical labeling requirements. Chemicals that are transferred from manufacturer containers into a secondary container or chemicals that are synthesized in the lab must have appropriate labels. This requirement also applies to the apparatus of a reaction that will be left overnight or beyond a normal work shift.


Exemptions: Chemicals that will be used within one work shift. This means that they will not be unattended during the work period of their intended use.
At the University of Minnesota, there are three accepted methods of labeling non-manufacturer containers or other vessels that will be left beyond one work shift. The laboratory PI/supervisor must decide on a method of container labeling and make sure it is enforced in the lab.
Acceptable Labeling Methods:

  1. Label each container with the chemical contents AND their hazards.

  2. Label each container with an acronym or symbol (i.e. chemical formula, chemical structure etc.) AND post a key in a highly visible spot in the lab that lists the chemical name and hazard for each acronym or symbol.

  3. Label each container with an acronym or symbol (i.e. chemical formula, chemical structure etc.) AND keep the container in an area (i.e. a secondary containment tray or on a designated shelf) that is labeled with the hazards of the material stored there. For this option, the container MUST return to the location by the end of the work shift.

Please note that hazardous waste has additional requirements. Detailed labeling requirements for waste can be found in the Hazardous Waste Guidebook on the DEHS website:



http://www.dehs.umn.edu/hazwaste_chemwaste_umn_cwmgbk_sec4.htm
For more guidance and labeling examples, please refer to the Secondary Container Labeling guidance document located here: http://z.umn.edu/containerlabeling.

C. Prudent Practices in the Laboratory

Laboratory standard operating procedures found in Prudent Practices in the Laboratory: Handling and Disposal of Chemicals (National Research Council, 2011) are adopted for general use at the University of Minnesota.


D. Controlled Substances and Alcohol

In conducting research with controlled substances, University authorized employees must comply with federal and state laws and regulations regarding their uses, including registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), storage requirements, inventory maintenance and substance disposal. A condensed guide to federal regulations as well as policies and forms pertaining to controlled substances are available on the Controlled Substances webpage.


Alcohol used for education, scientific research, or medicinal purposes can be purchased tax-free through University Stores (www.ustores.umn.edu), which holds the University of Minnesota site license for alcohol purchases with the Federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms. Further information and links to the ordering form are available at the following link: Tax Free Alcohol Ordering Procedures.
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