Study notes in test plan format



Download 229 Kb.
Page1/3
Date conversion20.07.2018
Size229 Kb.
  1   2   3
CALIFORNIA SUPPLEMENTAL EXAM

STUDY NOTES IN TEST PLAN FORMAT




Big Fat Disclaimer: This is a gigantic collection of notes originally taken in preparation for the CSE and organized around the Test Plan outline provided by CAB, by someone who had not yet taken the exam at the time of writing. Any possible resemblance to any actual exam answers is purely coincidental and most likely due to the focused nature of the test. It is intended to be shared with others who are preparing for the exam for assistance in organizing thoughts and focused study. This document is intended to be edited and added to as a continually improving source of material for exam study. If this is somehow unacceptable by CAB, please do not hesitate to delete this file from the ftp site. However it doesn’t contain anything that isn’t available in various study guides, seminar materials, and reference books (which require a significant investment, whereas this file is made freely available by the author(s))
NOTE TO POTENTIAL EDITORS/COAUTHORS: Please feel free to update, add to, or correct any errors in this document and re-post to the ftp site (please make a note of the revision date below and check back for updates). It is far from complete. Try to follow the outline format for organization’s sake. Most importantly, however, keep this file available as a resource by NOT using it as some method of illegally transferring known exam content. Please keep in mind the section of the Business and Professions code that prohibit divulging exam questions or the acceptance of exam questions that have been illegally obtained. (Business & Professions Code Division 1, Section 123). Just fill this sucker up with all kinds of information relating to the test plan topics in as brief a format as possible. Any information that doesn’t fit in the categories (such as summaries of the suggested materials) add to the “additional notes” section at the end or post in a separate file on the ftp site.
posted 9/3/05 (change this date as revisions are made)

        • ORGANIZATION OF ARCHITECTURAL PRACTICE


    1. PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATION

      1. Establish an internal organizational structure for project delivery

        • Considerations in establishing a project team

          1. Combination of skills

          2. Small enough to convene and communicate

          3. Mutual understanding of roles

          4. Personalities

        • Consultants

          1. Types: Structural, MEP, Civil, Land, Acoustic, Daylighting, Value-Eng, Elevator, Door Hardware, Curtainwall, Cost Est., Access, AV, Cleanroom, Graphic Des., Historic, Security, etc., etc. etc.

          2. Choose them based on complimentary skills, prior relationships, chemistry, client preference, etc.

          3. They are specialists. If you do not have the expertise necessary to provide the standard of care, hire a consultant

          4. Can be under subcontract with architect or client can have multiple prime contracts

          5. Liability

        • Delegation of tasks

          1. Identify team members most capable (and available)

          2. Give them authority and responsibility to do it

          3. Establish level of performance required

          4. Define completed activity or results

          5. Establish suitable completion date

          6. Establish milestones

        • Project Management responsibilities

          1. Client expectations

          2. Getting job done/taking charge

          3. Delegating tasks

            1. Identify team members most capable (and available)

            2. Give them authority and resp. to do it

            3. Establish level of performance req’d

            4. Define completed activity or results

            5. Establish suitable completion date

            6. Establish milestones

          4. Service/client relations

          5. Meet firm’s goals

        • Types of Firm Structures

          1. Sole Proprietor

          2. Small Firm

          3. Studio arrangement

          4. Project Team arrangement

        • Project Operations

          1. Startup

            1. Team briefing

            2. Project authorization

            3. Establish project files

            4. Identify key project information (directory, program, site info, applicable codes, schedule, milestones)

          2. Communications

            1. Meetings – Prepare agendas, do homework

            2. Routine communications – use transmittals, include contact info on all correspondence, date everything, take notes, etc.

            3. Documentation – document key decisions

          3. Closeout

            1. Collect project info

            2. Finalize billing

            3. Close out project files/archive

              1. Contract, final drawings & specs, file of progress reports & correspondence for period of statute of limitations

              2. After SOL, save docs that you are sole source, notes to change designs, judgements, etc.

            4. Self-evaluate

  • Procedures for coordinating staff, tasks, communications, and schedules

          1. Account Codes – fine tune project control, let you keep track of time

          2. Project Charges (time and expense charges should be accurate, all expenses should be accounted for and charged)

          3. Project Reports – periodic checks on time management and budget compliance for PM

          1. Project Operations

            1. Startup

              1. Team briefing

              2. Project authorization

              3. Establish project files

              4. Identify key project information (directory, program, site info, applicable codes, schedule, milestones)

            2. Communications

              1. Meetings – Prepare agendas, do homework

              2. Routine communications – use transmittals, include contact info on all correspondence, date everything, take notes, etc.

                • Avoid extreme, ambiguous, or promise terms (all, final, best, certify, guarantee, inspect, estimate)

                • Review all outgoing correspondence if necessary

              3. Documentation – document key decisions, don’t rely on memory

            3. Closeout

              1. Collect project info

              2. Finalize billing

              3. Close out project files/archive

                • Contract, final drawings & specs, file of progress reports & correspondence for period of statute of limitations

                • After SOL, save docs that you are sole source, notes to change designs, judgements, etc.

            4. Self-evaluate

          2. Overruns – unrealistic fees, scope “creep”, inadequate project management – how to fix?

      • Additional revenue?

      • Overtime?

      • Restaff with quicker people?

      • Take the loss




      1. Establish business management policies and procedures for architectural practice

        • Office business plans

          1. Mission Statement

            1. Statement that articulates overall direction and purpose of the firm

          2. Strategic Plan

            1. Who are we and where do we want to be? (Positioning & Issues)

              1. Key values, market segments, competition, strengths & weaknesses, opportunities & threats

            2. Where do we want to go? (goals & objectives)

              1. Specific, measurable, action-oriented, relevant, and timely

            3. How do we get there? (Strategies)

              1. Steps to be taken, Time to be completed

          3. Marketing strategies

            1. Solidifying client base

            2. Introducing new add-on services or lead-in services

            3. Expanding geographically (services or physical location)

            4. Adopting an innovation

            5. New project and client types

          4. Succession plan

            1. Responsible for

        • Employee training & Professional Development

          1. Mentorship

          2. In-house meetings of “war stories” about project situations

          3. Project evaluations

          4. Outside education

        • Employee compensation & benefits programs

          1. Can be incentive

          2. Can add as much as 35% to salaries

          3. Must provide equal access to benefits across salary range

        • Conditions of Employment

          1. Use of company resources

            1. Only for office-related use. Limit personal and outside use for “moonlighting” projects

          2. Moonlighting

            1. Can be dangerous to company for liability reasons

              1. Prohibit use of office time and equipment

            2. Can decrease the employees productivity

            3. Can compete for business

            4. Moonlighters must comply with business and tax law

            5. Not illegal, but can be contractually limited

          3. Adherence to general company policy

            1. Be consistent with company policies

            2. Follow labor laws

            3. Employee Handbook - employees salary, benefits, length of employment (at will or contract), your right to job reviews, company discipline procedures, vacation and holiday terms, etc. Keep it general and include a disclaimer that it is not a binding contract

        • Technological resources

          1. communication -

          2. computing – limit personal use to avoid damaging viruses and decreased productivity

          3. imaging devices – avoid copyright infringement

          4. software – maintain all licenses

        • Office Financial management principles

          1. Accounting techniques

            1. Cash-flow accounting – records revenue when received and expenses when paid out

            2. Accrual accounting – Records revenue when actually earned and expenses when actually incurred

        • Office procedures for management decisions

      2. Establish the architect’s role in relation to client and users

        • Types of Clients

          1. Sophisticated/Inexperienced (Involved or detached)

          2. Individual/Corporate

          3. Speculative developers

          4. End Users

        • Communication methods

          1. Meetings – meet regularly and address problems early

          2. Memoranda – document and log meetings for project continuity

          3. Reports –

        • Contractual Obligations to Client

          1. B141 or B163

            1. Owner and architect shall cooperate with one another to fulfill respective obligations

            2. Perform services expediciously (submit schedule and stick to it)

            3. Maintain confidentiality of information specifically identified as confidential

            4. Do not participate in any activities that may compromise professional judgement

            5. Review laws, codes, regulations applicable to the project and design accordingly

            6. Entitled to rely on accuracy of owner-provided information and services

          2. non-standard agreements

            1. Understand services, duties, and compensation

            2. Note redefinitions of liability, have insurance advisor review

            3. Suggest modifying AIA documents with attorney’s review

            4. Cross reference and coordinate with other project agreements (i.e. owner-contractor agreement) to make sure that responsibilities are the same

        • Types of Users

          1. Families

          2. Elderly

          3. Corporations

          4. Students

          5. Teenagers

          6. Disabled

        • User Communication

          1. Focus groups

          2. Hearings

          3. interviews

        • Impacts of Cultural Differences

          1. Demographic issues (young, old, families, singles, retired people)

          2. Economic issues

          3. Spatial properties

      3. Establish the architect’s role in relation to the community and special interest groups

        • Types of Special Interest Groups

          1. Environmental groups

          2. Citizens advisory committees

        • Neighborhood physical context

          1. Scale

          2. Use

          3. Setbacks

          4. Historical significance/styles

          5. Materials

        • Neighborhood political and social context

        • Methods to communicate with community and special interest groups

          1. Charets

          2. Public Hearings/input

          3. Public Relations/press releases

      4. Establish the architects role and responsibilities in relation to regulatory agencies

        • Types of Agencies

          1. City/County – Planning and Zoning, Subdivision controls, HOAs

          2. State – Controls private use of state land & resources and state projects

          3. Federal – Controls federal land and certain resources, as well as federal projects

        • Interrelationships between agencies

          1. Lead agency runs the show, other agencies comment on findings and voice concerns



        • Process for effective communication and interaction with agencies

          1. Talk with planner early and understand their requirements and particular concerns

        • Architect’s role and responsibilities in obtaining approvals and communicating agency requirements to the client

          1. Assist the owner in his duty of filing documents for approval of government agencies

          2. Architect is to review and determine applicable laws, codes, and regulations applicable to the project (can get advice from other professionals, like attorneys, engineers, other architects, etc.)



  1   2   3


The database is protected by copyright ©dentisty.org 2016
send message

    Main page