Student code of conduct



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STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT

 

 

Every student is entitled to an education which shall be offered in an orderly, healthy atmosphere, both physical and emotional, and to firm, fair treatment in all matters pertaining to school life.  Education is too important to be the sole responsibility of the schools.  The success of school discipline depends upon a collaborative effort among home, school and community.  By working together, the school system can achieve the goals it desires - safe, yet orderly schools and a quality education for all children.



 

The Tangipahoa Parish School System Code of Conduct outlines specific expectations of administrators, teachers, students, and parents.  The School Board is dedicated to making sure that all students are in school and engaged in learning.  The Assertive Discipline Plan partners with district-wide implementation of Positive Behavior Intervention Support (PBIS) to foster student achievement and behavioral support.

 

Code of Conduct Purpose

 


  • Create a consistent set of expectations for student behavior

  • Reinforce positive behavior and provide students with opportunities to develop appropriate social skills

  • Outline the interventions and consequences for students who engage in inappropriate behavior

  • Explain the rights of students with disabilities including procedural protections when disciplinary action is taken

  • Engage students in a safe, positive, and supportive learning environment

  • Describe the rights and responsibilities of all members of the school community

 

Responsibilities of the School Administrators

 


  • Define, teach, model and support appropriate student behaviors to create positive school environments

  • Distribute the Code of Conduct to students, parents and all school personnel

  • Implement the Code of Conduct in a fair and consistent manner

  • Review discipline referrals and determine appropriate intervention and/or corrective strategy/consequence

  • Use professional judgment to prevent minor incidents from becoming major challenges

  • Identify appropriate training and resources as needed to implement positive behavior interventions and supports

  • Implement Board policy in a fair and consistent manner

  • Maintain accurate personal discipline data of students

  • Ensure that behavior support plans for at-risk youths are implemented with high levels of integrity and compliance

  • Monitor, support and sustain the effective implementation and maintenance of PBIS

 

Responsibilities of the Teacher

 


  • Define, supervise, teach, model and support appropriate student behaviors to create positive school environments

  • Use appropriate classroom management strategies to maintain a learning environment that supports academic success

  • Teach and positively reinforce the Code of Conduct

  • Provide corrective instruction to students who demonstrate challenging behavior

  • Use a variety of activities in the classroom that increase student engagement

  • Address infractions through a variety of interventions including positive behavior interventions and supports as well as the use of alternatives to suspension and expulsion

  • Use professional judgment to prevent minor incidents from becoming major challenges

  • Request additional training or staff development as needed

 

Responsibilities of the Student

 


  • Attend school and all classes daily

  • Follow the Code of Conduct

  • Follow the Tangipahoa Parish School System’s dress code and uniform policy

  • Respect the rights of other parents, students, faculty, staff, school visitors, school property and the property of others

  • Work hard and do your best

  • Ask teachers, counselors, support staff, parents, school administrators, and other adults for help in solving problems

 

Responsibilities of the Parent or Guardian in the School Community

 


  • Read the Code of Conduct

  • Support your child in following the Student Code of Conduct

  • Understand your child’s rights and responsibilities

  • Teach your child to respect the rights of others

  • Teach your child to respect school property and the property of others

  • Recognize that school personnel must enforce the Code of Conduct

  • Seek available resources to support your child within the school and the community

  • Make sure your child comes to school every day on time and ready to learn

  • Be committed and available to visit your child’s school, as necessary, to evaluate his/her academic and/or behavioral progress

 

DEFINITION OF POSITIVE BEHAVIOR INTERVENTION SUPPORT

 

Positive Behavior Intervention Support (PBIS) gives people a new way to think about behavior.  PBIS is based on understanding why problem behaviors occur - the behavior's function.  This approach to behavior can occur on a school-wide level, in a specific setting, classroom, or with an individual student.  PBIS is the application of evidence-based strategies and systems to assist schools to increase academic performance, increase safety, decrease problem behavior, and establish positive school cultures.  The PBIS process results in the creation of effective intervention plans that will impede problem behaviors, teach new skills, and create support systems for the student.



 

On a school-wide level, PBIS relies on accurate and reliable discipline referral data to understand the behaviors occurring across campus.  An analysis of the data allows a school team to identify the problem areas, brainstorm interventions such as where and what to teach, reward the students exhibiting the expected behavior, and communicate findings to the staff, students, and families.

 

PBIS provides a positive and effective alternative to the traditional methods of discipline.  PBIS methods are research-based and proven to significantly reduce the occurrence of problem behaviors in the school, resulting in a more positive school climate and increased academic performance.  PBIS is consistent with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, which advocates the use of positive behavior interventions and school-based disciplinary strategies that reduce or eliminate the need to use suspension and expulsion as disciplinary options.



 

DEFINITION OF DISCIPLINE

 

Discipline is defined as actions that teachers, administrators, support staff, and parents employ to teach students the essential skills necessary for academic and social success.

 

DEFINITION OF CORRECTIVE STRATEGIES

 

Academic success is directly correlated with instructional time received by the student.



 

In the effort to fully implement Positive Behavior Intervention Support and reduce the loss of instructional time due to out-of-school suspensions and expulsions, the Tangipahoa Parish Public School System expects that each school will utilize a wide variety of corrective strategies that do not remove children from valuable instructional time.

 

Corrective Strategies, also known as alternatives to suspension and expulsion, may include but are not limited to:

 


  • Contact and/or conference with parent/guardian

  • Behavioral contracts and/or Behavior Support Plans

  • Check-in/Check-out (CICO)

  • Home/school communication system

  • Reflective activity

  • Loss of privilege

  • Schedule adjustment

  • Referral to the school counselor

  • Refer the student to the Response to Intervention Team

  • After-school detention

  • Saturday School

  • In School Isolation/ISI

  • In School Detention (Lunch Detention, Recess Detention)

  • Supervised work assignment

 

DEFINITION OF MINOR INFRACTIONS (Handled by the classroom teacher)

 


  • Disobedience

  • Dress Code Violations

  • Disrespect for Authority

  • Classroom Disturbance

  • Tardiness

  • Truancy

 

DEFINITION OF MAJOR INFRACTIONS (Handled by the school administrator)

 


  • Assault (physical attack)

  • Possession of a firearm

  • Possession of a weapon other than a firearm with intent to use

  • Distribution, use and possession of drugs and/or alcohol

  • Inciting a riot

  • Molesting students, immoral indecent behavior

  • Promoting gang membership and/or activities

  • Hazing

  • Extortion 

  • Verbal Abuse

  • Fighting

  • Vandalism

  • Possession or use of tobacco on school grounds

  • Profane language

  • Stealing

  • Possession of pornographic material

  • Bullying, intimidations, and/or threatening others

  • Leaving campus without permission

  • Cutting class/skipping school

  • Conduct injurious to others

  • Possession of a cell phone (see policy JCDAE, Electronic Devices)

 

The Tangipahoa Parish School Board mandates that each school establishes a schoolwide Assertive Discipline Plan with specific stated expectations.

 

The goal of a schoolwide Assertive Discipline Plan is to develop a systematic, consistent way in which to deal with discipline problems throughout the school.  To accomplish this goal there must be a two-sided effort from the staff:



 

  1. Every teacher will develop and post a classroom plan, i.e. a set of rules, consequences, and rewards that are in effect at all times in his or her classroom.  Teachers are encouraged to write rules in a positive manner that will instill appropriate behavior patterns in students.  (Plan shall meet with prior approval of principal.))………………………………………………..
     

  2. There must also be a school-wide plan that governs student behavior in all of the common areas in the school.
     

  3. School rules must be posted in all common areas.
     

  4. All parents will be contacted by Homeroom teachers via phone within the first six (6) weeks of school and by all teachers as the need arises as evidenced by Parent Log-in Sheet.

 

ADMINISTRATOR'S ASSERTIVE DISCIPLINE LADDER (Not to include Dress Code, Minor Bus Infractions, and Tardiness for Grades K-5)

 

The School Board has implemented the Assertive Discipline Plan for the treatment of students who violate school rules.  Before a student is referred to the administrator for a violation of classroom rules, five steps designated by the classroom teacher will be followed in order to correct the student's discipline problem.  Severe clause referrals will automatically be sent to the principal's office.



 


STEP I:  

 


  1. The Student Handbook will be reviewed with each student; both school and class rules will be reviewed.  The student will be directed to inform their parents.  The school has the option of sending a copy of the Assertive Discipline Policy to each parent.………………………………….
     

  2. School will contact parents and provide documentation of this contact and may receive one (1) day of Positive Action Class (PAC).

 

STEP II: 

 


  1. Teachers will contact parents by telephone or mail, or email and arrange parent conference

  2. Parent Conference with administrator/teacher; two (2) days PAC and loss of privileges or student may receive one (1) day of OSS.

 

STEP III:  

 


  1. Administrator will contact parent by telephone or mail.
     

  2. Alternative disciplinary measures or PAC for three (3) days or OSS for one (1) day or any combination of PAC and OSS.
     

  3. The principal shall require a parent conference before the student can return to school.  A student will be allowed to make up any work missed as a result of the parents' failure to attend the conference.

 

STEP IV:

 


  1. Contact parent by telephone or mail.
     

  2. Four (4) days of SS or five (5) days of PAC or any combination of the two based on the administrator’s discretion.
     

  3. Parents to accompany student back to school for conference with principal.

 

STEP V:  

 


  1. Contact parent by telephone or mail.
     

  2. Suspension, five (5) days OSS.
     

  3. Principal or Principal’s designee must schedule a Step V conference with the student and parent prior to the student's return to school.

 STEP VI:  

 


  1. Contact parent by telephone or mail.
     

  2. Suspended (OSS): up to nine (9) days until a Due Process Hearing for Expulsion is held with the Supervisor of Child Welfare and Attendance.
     

  3. Mail or fax a letter to Supervisor of Child Welfare and Attendance requesting expulsion.

  4. …………………………………………………………… 

  5. *A student may be recommended for expulsion at any time if the administrator feels the student's actions warrant such recommendation.

 

Students committing the following offenses may receive the corresponding disciplinary actions:

 

OFFENSE

DISPOSITION

A.

1.

Assault (physical attack)

Step 6

 

2.

Possession of a weapon (State statute)

Step 6

 

3.

Possession of a firearm

Step 6

 

4.

Distribution, use and possession of drugs and/or alcohol

Step 6

 

5.

Inciting a riot (creating unruly conditions)

Step 6

 

6.

Molesting students, immoral/indecent behavior

Step 6

 

7.

Verbal abuse; threatening of any school system employee

Step 6

 

8.

Promoting gang membership and/or activities

Step 5

 

9.

Hazing

Step 5

 

 

 

 

B.

1. 

Possession of a weapon (other than a firearm)

CWA must conduct hearing



Step 5

 

2.

Verbal abuse (of an adult to include racial)

Step 4

 

3.

Extortion (obtain through intimidation) 

Step 3

 

4.

Verbal abuse of students

Step 3

 

 

 

 

C.

1.

Fighting -- student provoking a fight* (see Violence Prevention Program)

Step 5

 

 

 

 

D.

1.

Vandalism

Steps 5 (to include restitution)

 

2.

Possession of pornographic material (except through technology)

Step 4

 

3.

Possession or use of tobacco on school grounds

Step 3

 

4.

Stealing (not to include school property:may also result to a Step VI) 

Step 3 (to include restitution)

 

5.

Profane language

Step 2

 

 

 

 

E.

1.

Bullying, intimidation, or threatening (See Violence Prevention Program)

Step 5

 

2.

Disrespect of authority 

Step 3

 

3.

Classroom disturbance

Step 3

 

4.

Gambling

Step 3

 

5.

Leaving campus

Step 3

 

6.

Disobedience

Step 2

 

7.

Cutting class

Step 2

 

8.

Tardiness

Step 2

 

9.

Truancy

Step 2

 

10.

Throwing objects 

Step 2

 

11. 

 Possession of a cell phone

See policy JCDAE, Electronic Devices

 

*Provokers or instigators of fights will be handled according to the discretion of the principal or his/her designee.  Students reasonably concluded to be acting in self-defense may not be disciplined.  Students who fight for the second time during a school year will automatically be placed on Step VI.

 

These are suggested starting points.  Chronic offenders can be moved to Steps V and/or VI in all categories, and administrators reserve the right to request a Step VI hearing on the first fight if they believe that the incident and/or the instigators pose a security risk to the campus, thus endangering the welfare of other students.  This includes gang fights resulting in severe bodily harm.



 

DISCIPLINE PROCEDURES FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

 

The Discipline Procedures for Children With Exceptionalities in Tangipahoa Parish Schools are developed and implemented in accordance with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004, the federal law governing the provision of a Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) for the discipline of students with disabilities; Louisiana Bulletin 1706 Subchapter B:  Discipline Procedures for Students with Disabilities and §530; and the policy of the School Board of Tangipahoa Parish. 



 

School personnel may remove a student with a disability or suspected disability, who violates a code of student conduct, from his or her current placement to an appropriate interim alternate educational setting, another setting, or suspension for not more than ten (10) consecutive school days, to the extent that those alternatives are applied to students without disabilities.  Additional removals of not more than ten (10) consecutive school days in the same school year for separate incidents of misconduct are allowed, as long as the removal does not constitute a change of placement.  A change of placement occurs if a student with a disability is removed from his or her current educational placement for more than ten (10) consecutive school days; or a student with a disability is subjected to a series of removals, cumulating to ten or more days, that constitute a pattern because of factors such as the length of each removal, the total amount of time the student is removed, and the proximity of the removals to one another.

 

After a student with a disability has been removed from his or her current placement for ten (10) school days in the same school year, during any subsequent days of removal the school district must provide services which enable the student to participate in the general education curriculum and progress toward meeting his or her IEP goals.  In addition, the student should receive a functional behavioral assessment and behavioral intervention plan designed to address the behavior violation so that it does not recur.  



 

Whenever an action involving a removal that constitutes a change of placement for a student is contemplated, a Manifestation Determination Review is required. 

 

Within ten (10) school days of any decision to change the placement of a student with a disability because of a violation of a code of student conduct, the IEP team shall review evaluation and diagnostic results and other relevant information supplied by the parent or the student, consider observations of the student, and consider the student’s IEP and placement to determine if the conduct in question was caused by, or had a direct and substantial relationship to, the student’s disability; or if the conduct in question was the direct result of the district’s failure to implement the IEP.



 

On the date which the decision is made, school personnel shall notify the parents of that decision and provide the parents the procedural safeguards (Louisiana’s Educational Rights of Children with Exceptionalities in Public Schools).

 

For disciplinary changes in placement due to behavior that violates a code of student conduct that exceed ten (10) consecutive days:



 

If school personnel, the parent, and members of the student’s IEP team make the determination that the conduct was not a manifestation of the student’s disability, school personnel may apply disciplinary procedures to students with disabilities in the same manner and for the same duration as the procedures would be applied to students without disabilities, except the student should continue to receive educational services.  School personnel and at least one of the student’s teachers should determine the extent of services needed for the student to participate in the general education curriculum and progress toward meeting his or her IEP goals.  In addition, the student should receive a functional behavioral assessment and behavioral intervention plan designed to address the behavior violation so that it does not recur.  If a behavioral intervention plan has already been developed, the current plan will be reviewed and modified to address the current behavior.  Services may be provided in an interim alternative educational setting, as determined by the student’s IEP Team.

 

If school personnel, the parent, and members of the student’s IEP team make the determination that the conduct was a manifestation of the student’s disability, the IEP Team shall conduct a functional behavioral assessment and implement a behavioral intervention plan for the student.  If a behavioral intervention plan has already been developed, the current plan will be reviewed and modified to address the current behavior.  If the school district failed to implement the IEP, immediate steps should be taken to remedy the deficiencies.  The student is to return to the placement from which he or she was removed, except under Special Circumstances; or unless the parent and school personnel agree to a change of placement as part of the modification of the behavioral intervention plan.



 

School personnel may remove a student to an interim alternative educational setting, under Special Circumstances, for not more than forty-five (45) school days, without regard to whether the behavior is determined to be a manifestation of the student’s disability if:

 


  1. The student carries a weapon to or possesses a weapon at school, on school premises, or to or at a school function under the jurisdiction of the State or any School Board (under paragraph (2) of the first subsection (g) of Sec 930 of Title 18, United States Code)………………………………..
     

  2. The student knowingly possesses or uses illegal drugs, sells or solicits the sale of a controlled substance, while at school, on school premises, or at a school function under the jurisdiction of the State or any School Board (Identified under schedules I, II, III, IV, or V in section 202(c) of the Controlled Substance Act (21 USC 812(c))……………………………..
     

  3. The student has inflicted serious bodily injury on another person while at school, on school premises, or at a school function under the jurisdiction of the State or any School Board (under paragraph (3) of subsection (h) of Sec. 1365 of Title 18, United States Code).

 

In-school suspensions in which a student’s IEP is being implemented are not considered removals from a student’s current educational setting.  All other removals, whether to an alternative school or homebound, are considered changes in placement, regardless of whether the student’s IEP is being implemented in the alternative setting.

 

Any parent of a student with a disability who disagrees with any decision regarding placement or the manifestation determination; or the school district believes that maintaining the current placement of the student is substantially likely to result in injury to the student or others, may appeal the decision by requesting a due process hearing under Bulletin 1706, §507 (Filing a Request for Impartial Due Process Hearing) and § 508 A and B (Due Process Hearing Request).



 

Whenever an Expedited Due Process Hearing is requested, the parents or the school district involved in the dispute should have the opportunity for an impartial due process hearing which should occur within twenty (20) days of the date the request is filed.  A resolution meeting shall occur within seven (7) days of receiving notice of the Request for Due Process Hearing unless the parent and school district agree, in writing, to waive the meeting.  The due process hearing may proceed unless the matter has been resolved to the satisfaction of both parties within fifteen (15) days of receipt of the Request for Due Process Hearing.

 

Revised:  August, 1988

Revised:  August, 1991

Revised:  January, 1994

Revised:  June 20, 1995

Revised:  September, 1997

Revised:  November, 2004

Revised:  March, 2009

Revised:  December, 2009

Revised:  July, 2010

Revised:  October, 2010

Revised:  August, 2011

 

 

 

Ref:     Regulations for Implementation of the Exceptional Children's Act, Bulletin 1706, Louisiana Department of Education



Board minutes, 9-6-88, 7-9-91, 6-20-95, 7-20-04, 12-9-08, 3-17-09, 12-8-09, 7-6-10, 10-5-10, 8-2-11

 


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