Seminar 8 sports and ethics, giving opinion sports and ethics



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Centrum jazykového vzdělávání – oddělení na FSpS, Anglický jazyk I, magisterský program - 2. semestr

Seminar 8 – Sports and Ethics, Giving an opinion; Page (of ), July 2009


SEMINAR 8 SPORTS AND ETHICS, GIVING OPINION

SPORTS AND ETHICS

"Fair play - the winning way."

T
ask 1 Vocabulary matching


Match the following words from the below texts with their equivalents;

  1. commercialization

a

a fraud or swindle

  1. compromise

b

a machine that is operated by the insertion of a coin in with the prospect of winning money

  1. conflict of interest

c

a recommendation of what would or would not be ethical behavior under given circumstances

  1. courtesy

d

a situation in which a public official's decisions are influenced by his personal interests

  1. cheating

e

an inclination to weigh both views or opinions equally

  1. ethical considerations

f

becoming mature, adult

  1. free of obligation to any interest

g

fairness, following the rules

  1. impartial judging, impartiality

h

favoring one side or the other

  1. inappropriate

i

leader, hero

  1. maturation

j

not feeling indebted to do a favor to someone

  1. officiating

k

not suitable for a particular occasion

  1. personally biased

l

politeness, gallantry

  1. role model

m

refereeing

  1. self-improvement

n

the act of commercializing something

  1. slots, slot machine

o

the act of improving yourself

  1. sportsmanship

p

to reduce the quality or degree of something


WHAT IS FAIR PLAY?
Pair work What is your definition of fair play? Write it down with your partner.
......................................................................................................................................................................

......................................................................................................................................................................

Code of Sports Ethics


The basic principle of the Code of Sports Ethics is that ethical considerations leading to fair play are integral, and not optional elements, of all sports activity including recreational as well as competitive sport.



WHAT IS FAIR PLAY?
Fair play is defined as much more than playing with the rules. It incorporates1 the concepts of friendship, respect for others and always playing within the right spirit. Fair play is defined as a way of thinking, not just a way of behaving. It incorporates issues concerned with the elimination of cheating2, sportsmanship3, doping, violence4 (both physical and verbal), excessive commercialization5 and corruption.

HOW TO ENSURE FAIR PLAY?
One can support the spirit of fair play in many ways, as an individual you have the following responsibilities:


Personal Behaviour


  • To behave in a way which sets a good example and presents a positive role model for children and young people.



When working with Young People,



  • To put as a first priority the health and safety of the child or young athlete and ensure that such considerations come before the reputation of the school or club or coach or parent.

  • To avoid treating children as simply small adults but be aware6 of the physical and psychological changes during maturation7 and how these affect sporting performance.

  • To take equal interest in the less talented as in the talented and emphasize8 and reward personal levels of achievement.



Adapted from http://portal.unesco.org/education/en/ev.php-URL_ID=2223&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html


  1. Sports Officials Code of Ethics

National Association of Sports Officials (NASO) is the world's largest organization for sports officials at every level and all sports. With more than 16,000 members, NASO is there for you no matter your own level of experience. NASO declares acceptance of this Code:



ARTICLE I
Sports officials must be free of obligation to any interest9 other than the impartial10 and fair judging of sports competitions. Game decisions which are personally biased11 are dishonest12 and unacceptable.

ARTICLE II
Sports officials recognize that anything which may lead to a conflict of interest13 must be avoided. Gifts, favors, special treatment, privileges, employment or a personal relationship with a school or team which can compromise the impartiality of officiating14 must be avoided.

ARTICLE III
Sports officials have an obligation to treat other officials with professional courtesy15 and recognize that it is inappropriate16 to criticize other officials publicly.

ARTICLE IV
Sports officials have a responsibility to continuously seek17 self-improvement through study of the game, rules, mechanics and the techniques of game management.

ARTICLE V
Sports officials shall protect the public (fans, administrators, coaches, players, et al.) from inappropriate behaviour and shall try to eliminate all practices which bring discredit from the officiating profession.

Adapted from http://www.naso.org/benefits/ethics.htm



GAMBLING - LISTENING

Task 2 You will hear a conversation about gambling. Match these opinions to the person who expresses them. There are two opinions which you do not need to use. The first speaker is Amanda.
  1. Betting on horses requires skill and knowledge.

  2. There is nothing wrong with buying a lottery ticket. Amanda (A)

  3. Sports should be enjoyed for their own sake.

  4. Gambling is like a drug.

  5. Gambling provides harmless enjoyment. Tony (T)

  6. The national Lottery gives a lot of money to good causes.

  7. Horse racing is exciting if you have put money on a horse.

  8. Gamblers´ wives and children suffer. Debbie (D)

  9. No one goes to the cinema any more.

(Adapted from Jones, L.: New Progress to First Certificate, Cambridge University Press, 1997, U 4.3)


Task 3 Listen to the conversation again and notice how the speakers interrupt each other politely. Tick the expressions they used.


  1.  I´m sorry to interrupt. By the way… Could I just say something? Yes, but… Just a minute. I´m sorry but… I see what you mean but…  That reminds me…




Giving an opinion, structuring an argument
Observe the following useful expressions.

Giving opinions

I definitely think that....

I'm sure that....

I'm convinced that....

I really do think that....

As I see it, ....

I feel ....

Personally, I believe ...

In my opinion/view, ....

It seems to me ....

I tend to think that ....




Agreeing


I (quite) agree.

I think you're absolutely right.

That's a very good point.

You've got a very good point there.

I totally agree.

Exactly!


Well … maybe … possibly …

I'm not so sure about that.

You may be right.

Yes, but don't you think …?

I can see your point, but …

I see what you mean but …

It seems to me ...

I tend to think ...




Disagreeing


But don't you think that …?

I see what you mean, but …

But what about …?

I take your point, but ,…

I'm afraid I can't agree with … on this matter.

I wouldn't say that.

I don't agree at all.

I can't accept that.




Asking for opinions


What do you think about ...?.

What are you views ...?

What's your opinion of ...?

What are you feelings about ...?

Have you got any comments on ...?

Could I have your reaction to ...?

Do you have any particular views on ...?

Don't you agree, ...?




Task 4 Students at university need to organise their lives, control their finances, keep records of phone numbers, remember assignment and exam dates etc. Some students use paper diaries and notes for this, but the use of electronic Personal Data Assistants is becoming more popular.

The table below compares 19 PDAs.



Using the information given in the table, recommend one of the PDAs for general student use. You will need to describe some of the PDAs, compare and contrast to others look at advantages and disadvantages, recommend one and defend your opinion against others, give arguments to the others about why your choice is the best.

PDA

Price

Operating System

Memory

Size

Weight

Power

Screen Size

Casio Cassiopeia E-125

£499

Microsoft Pocket PC

32MB

131 x 84 x 20mm

250g

Rechargeable Lithium-Ion

240 x 320 pixels

Compaq iPaq H3630

£449

Microsoft Pocket PC

32MB

130 x 83 x 16mm

179g

Rechargeable Lith-Polymer

240 x 320 pixels

Compaq iPaq H3130

£338

Microsoft Pocket PC

16MB

130 x 83 x 16mm

163g

Rechargeable Lith-Polymer

240 x 320 pixels

HandEra 330

£335

Palm OS

8MB

81 x 121 x 17mm

167g

4 x AA batteries

240 x 320 pixels

Handspring Visor Deluxe

£144

Palm OS

8MB

130 x 83 x 16mm

163g

2 x AAA batteries

240 x 320 pixels

Hanspring Visor Edge

£269

Palm OS

8MB

119 x 79 x 11mm

136g

Rechargeable Lithium-Ion

160 x 160 pixels

Handspring Visor Prism

£349

Palm OS

8MB

120 x 75 x 21mm

194g

Rechargeable Lithium-Ion

160 x 160 pixels

Handspring Visor Platinum

£189

Palm OS

8MB

122 x 76 x 18mm

153g

2 x AAA batteries

160 x 160 pixels

HP Jornada 548

£389

Microsoft Pocket PC

32MB

118 x 79 x 18mm

260g

Rechargeable Lithium-Ion

240 x 360 pixel

HP Jornada 720

£665

Windows for Handheld PC 2000

32MB

189 x 95 x 34mm

510g

Rechargeable Lithium-Ion

640 x 260 pixels

Palm m05

£169

Palm OS

8MB

79 x 118 x 18mm

125g

2 x AAA batteries

160 x 160 pixels

Palm m505

£399

Palm OS

8MB

114 x 79 x 10mm

139g

Rechargeable Lithium-Ion

240 x 320 pixels

Psion Revo Plus

£300

EPOC 5

16MB

79 x 157 x 17mm

200g

Rechargeable N1MH

480 x 160 pixels

Psion 5MX

£400

EPOC 5

16MB

90 x 170 x 23mm

320g

2 x AA batteries

640 x 240 pixels

Adapted from http://www.uefap.com/writing/exercise/function/compcon2.htm




EXTRA Gambling Terms and Sports Betting Definitions


Bet – To risk something on the outcome of an event

Book - In sports gambling a Book is an establishment that accepts bets on the outcome of horse racing and sporting events.

Bookie, Bookmaker - In sports wagering a person who accepts bets.

Buck - Sports betting term for a $100 wager.

Dime - $1000.00 sports betting wager.

Dollar - $100, in sports wagering.

Double Bet - In sports betting a double bet is a wager for twice the size of one's usual wager; also known as "double pop" or "doubling up."

Favorite - In sports betting this it the team expected to win an event. The quoted odds reflect the extent to which the choice is favored.

Fifty cents - $50.00 of sports betting action.

Gamble- To risk money on the outcome of an event.

Juice - The bookmaker's commission on a losing bet, also known as "vigorish."

Longshot - In sports wagering this is a team or horse perceived to be unlikely to win.

Nickel - $500.00, in on a sports gambling wager.

Odds- The likelihood of the outcome occurring, stated in numbers form.

Power Ratings- The strength of a team in comparison to another team.

Tout - Someone who sells their expertise on sports wagering.

Underdog - The team perceived to be most likely to lose. Also known as the "dog" in sports betting terminology.

Wager- To risk money on the outcome of an event.

Wise guy - A wise guy is the sports gambling term for a well-informed or knowledgeable handicapper or bettor.

Adapted from http://www.docsports.com/gambling-terms.html



1Incorporate – zahrnovat

2Cheating – podvádění

3Sportsmanship – sportovní chování

4Violence – násilí

5Excessive commercialization – nepřiměřená komercializace

6Be aware of – být si vědom čeho

7Maturation – zrání

8Emphasize – zdůraznit

9Free of obligation to any interest – nebýt vázán žádným zájmem

10Impartial – nestranný

11Biased – neobjektivní

12Dishonest – nepoctivý

13Conflict of interet – střet zájmů

14Officiating – rozhodování

15Professional courtesy – profesní zdvořilost, profesionalita

16Inappropriate – nevhodný

17Seek – hledat, usilovat





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