Sbs curriculum Committee Proposal New Academic Plan



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SBS

Curriculum Committee Proposal

New Academic Plan

Fall

2017


If this new plan is not listed in the current NAU academic program inventory, then you must first complete the academic planning framework
If this is a new certificate that will be eligible for federal financial aid, then please submit the gainful employment application.
All Plans with CAEP designation, or plans seeking CAEP designation, must include an CAEP Accreditation Memo of Approval from the NAU CAEP administrator prior to submission.


  1. Academic Unit:

Anthropology







2. Academic Plan Name:

Social Science Forensics Minor







3. Emphasis:










Section I

4. Justification for new academic plan. Ensure your justification describes how the proposed plan is related to the short and long-term goals of the Academic Unit, College, and/or University. (If the justification is the same as the response to #1 of the Academic Planning Framework Full Proposal, copy and paste the response here).



Forensic science” is the application of a wide spectrum of sciences and techniques that aid in detecting and solving crime, identifying individuals (victims and offenders) involved in crime, reconstructing events before, during and after the crime, and service to the courts and legal system.
At Northern Arizona University, the purpose of the Social Science Forensics minor is to offer students an alternative to exclusively lab-based approaches. Each semester, Anthropology and Criminology/Criminal Justice students inquire about forensic courses and the possibility of a minor. The “CSI Effect” and the popularity of forensics and crime investigation has students majoring in Social and Behavioral Sciences interested but without a specific program or plan to answer that interest. The projected interest in a social science based forensic minor is estimated at 10-15 Anthropology students and up to 50 Criminology and Criminal Justice students within the first two years. The Social Science Forensics minor emphasizes social science applications, and complements rather than competes with the Chemistry Department’s forensics program, which is lab science based. Alternatively, the Social Science Forensics minor addresses the social, cultural, legal/policy and humanistic aspects that historically and contemporarily underpin forensics, its development and application, such as human behavior, cultural and political influences, criminal behavior, criminal justice, and crime scene investigations. Students would benefit from this program by being exposed to issues that play important roles in today’s forensic world. The social unrest and tension that exists between certain communities and law enforcement is but one example of the social sciences side of education that could benefit those who choose a career in forensics or law enforcement. Finally, many courses based in the Social Sciences are Liberal Studies or Diversity designated courses; Anthropology offers the highest percentage of those courses. For the Social Science Forensics minor, there are forensic- relevant courses that have the Liberal Studies or Diversity designation. The Chemistry Bachelor of Science program with emphasis in Forensics and Criminalistics, requires 15 credits in Liberal Studies or Diversity; thus, they and other fields are complemented by Liberal Studies and Diversity courses from the Social Sciences rather than in competition with them. Finally, the focus will be on the social, cultural, political, legal, historical and global contexts that contribute to forensic knowledge and technical field skills. The Social Science Forensics minor will prepare all students in the application of medico-legal writing, imagery, composite sketching, forensic archaeology, forensic anthropology, death investigation work (often done for medical examiner’s reports), crime investigation, criminal law procedure, and gender and ethnicity issues influencing law enforcement and forensic work – all of which reflect important issues of our day.
Many universities offer forensic science minors that emphasize a specific program trajectory such as technology (digital fraud, identity theft), or chemistry (toxicology, DNA), but few adequately address the importance of social sciences in crime investigation. Students who do not have the background of a laboratory oriented science major will find this minor allows them to explore alternatives and the full diversity of this field, while encouraging the applied value of a social and behavioral sciences perspective.

 

Why: This approach is a way to introduce students to the options of contributing in the forensic sciences field besides natural and physical sciences. The Social Science Forensics minor at NAU can be seen as an enhancement program designed to appeal to the student as an applied aspect of a field in which they are already majoring within the Social and Behavioral Sciences, in keeping with NAU’s mission of encouraging an applied value to any field of study. The Forensics Minor is designed to give students the advantage of some basic field skills and forensic background knowledge to continue their education in specialized forensic programs or in graduate studies if they choose. Thus equipped, students will be positioned to make informed decisions on areas of expertise in which they may wish to concentrate and invest more time and financial commitment. The Social Science Forensics minor on their NAU transcripts will ensure students will have the advantage in their academic or employment pursuits.

 

How: The emphasis will be on social, cultural, ethnic, gender, political, legal, historical and global contexts that contribute to forensic knowledge. This is an interdisciplinary minor, drawing from courses across the Social and Behavioral Sciences. In addition, new Anthropology faculty with specialization and real world experience in forensics has produced new Anthropology forensic courses within the last year and include the intended foundation course for the minor: ANT 255 “Murder, Mayhem and Madness: the Development of Forensic Science in Cultural and Historical Context.” This course provides students with an overview of forensic applications from many fields across time and the impact of culture and history upon that development; ANT 430 “Forensic Archaeology” gives students hands-on experiential learning exercises which include excavating simulated clandestine burials, documenting them, evidence per crime scene protocols and report writing as would be encountered in the real world. The minor will draw from these and other existing courses in Anthropology, Criminology and Criminal Justice, and other departments within the Social and Behavioral Sciences. The selected courses are offered on a regular basis by existing faculty and do not require additional funding to teach or develop them for this minor. Besides a lecture-based classroom experience, students will have opportunities to learn technical skills. Scientific inquiry and critical thinking about the natural and physical sciences will still be components of the Social Science Forensics minor, but the focus will be the merit of social sciences in crime investigation that is often not adequately addressed in forensic programs. Activities will engage students with real field methods and project-based course work that imitates the team work typical of investigative scenarios.

 

The Social Science Forensics minor provides, and also extends, the liberal arts and cultural understanding foundations available through the SBS curriculum to students interested in the forensic sciences. NAU students majoring in the social sciences have long expressed strong interest in forensic sciences, a result of the “CSI effect” and its popularity. The addition of new Anthropology faculty with specialization in forensics, and the long experience of faculty in Criminology and Criminal Justice, has resulted in the development of courses that afford the opportunity of an interdisciplinary approach that benefits students with a meaningful goal, the Social Science Forensics minor. The minor will enhance employment options and continuing educational and career opportunities.


While this minor focusses the social science applications in the field of forensics, scientific inquiry will not be compromised and is one component of many as it will include critical thinking about the natural and physical sciences’ role in crime investigation. Because it emphasizes social science applications, this minor complements, rather than competes with the Chemistry Department’s forensics program. Many universities offer forensic science minors that emphasize technology (digital fraud, identity theft), or lab and chemistry based studies (toxicology, DNA), but few adequately address the importance of social sciences in crime investigation. Students who do not have the background of a laboratory oriented science major will find this minor allows them to explore alternatives and the full diversity of this field, while encouraging the applied value of a social and behavioral sciences perspective.
The Social Science Forensics minor is designed to give students the advantage of social science field skills and background knowledge to be able to qualify for entry level forensic work. Students completing the minor will be better positioned to make informed decisions on areas of expertise in which they may wish to concentrate, and to continue their education in specialized forensic programs or graduate studies if they choose. The Social Science Forensics minor on student transcripts will also enhance their employment pursuits.

5. New academic plan purpose statement. Resources, Examples & Tools for Developing Program Purpose Statements



Social Science Forensics Minor Summary Purpose Statement:
Forensic science” is the application of a wide spectrum of sciences and techniques that aid in detecting and solving crime, identifying individuals (victims and offenders) involved in crime, reconstructing events before, during and after the crime, and service to the courts and legal system. In the Social Sciences Forensic Minor, students develop an understanding of the social, cultural, historical and political differences in the United States and globally, impacting forensic science development and its application in theory and method in criminology, criminal justice and law enforcement systems. These include issues of gender, ethnicity, social inequality, and changing cultural dynamics and values affixed to human life, civil rights and criminal justice. Students who complete the minor are also expected to write and communicate effectively in medico-legal terminology for entry level work in crime investigation and to document evidence according to accepted protocols that preserve evidentiary integrity and ensure acceptability in court, to work effectively in teams as found in forensic investigative units, and have working familiarity with the interdisciplinary nature of forensic science such that they can identify relevant fields that contribute to an investigation. Students will have an understanding of various technical field skills relevant to crime scene investigation. Students who complete the Social Science Forensic minor will have knowledge of career options and be more competitive and well-rounded for entry level, non-lab based forensic work such as death investigation, law enforcement, or victim/offender identification.
The focus of the minor is on the social, cultural, political, legal, historical and global contexts that contribute to forensic knowledge and technical field skills. Students will have opportunities to learn experientially with simulated investigation strategies designed to teach hands-on field methods in a controlled environment. Students will engage in project-based course work that imitates real life scenarios and emphasizes team work concomitant with real crime scene investigation and a variety of applied techniques at the introductory level. The Social Science Forensics minor can prepare students in the application of medico-legal writing, imagery (including photography), composite sketching, forensic archaeology, forensic anthropology, death investigation work (often done for medical examiner’s reports), crime investigation, criminal law procedure, and gender and ethnicity issues influencing law enforcement and forensic work – all of which reflect important issues of our day.
6. Student learning outcomes of the plan. If structured as plan/emphases, include for both core and

emphases. (Resources, Examples & Tools for Developing Effective Program Student Learning Outcomes)


Students will be able to:

  • Identify key historical and current events, scientific breakthroughs, and social/cultural changes in the United States and globally that have contributed to the evolution of forensic science;

  • Communicate effectively through demonstrated reading comprehension, analytical skills, and written work and/or oral presentation that demonstrates a proficiency appropriate for social and behavioral investigative reports and court related documentation in Arizona and the United States in general;

  • Recognize and describe the significance of historical and social context and its impact on forensic science;

  • Critically assess the needs of a variety of investigative scenarios and determine what area(s) of forensic science should be applied and what it can contribute;

  • Demonstrate competence with hands-on field and lab skills (with a grade of C or better) as to victim/offender identification and crime scene reconstruction;

  • Identify and explain how forensic science varies across natural, social and behavioral sciences;

  • Identify and explain how the application of forensic science varies across other forms of investigations (i.e. legal, crime, psychological, medical, etc.);

  • Summarize and differentiate relevant theories, methods and techniques as they apply to forensic sciences;

  • Summarize and differentiate relevant names of those whose work pioneered resulting laws, methods, and theories in forensic science and,

  • Collaborate effectively in teamwork where necessary, utilizing technical skills, critical thinking, ethics, and adaptive ability in order to execute group-oriented projects and/or exercises toward a goal.


The Social Science Forensics minor is designed to give students the advantage of social science field skills and background knowledge to be able to qualify for entry level forensic work. Students completing the minor will be better positioned to make informed decisions on areas of expertise in which they may wish to concentrate, and to continue their education in specialized forensic programs or graduate studies if they choose. The Social Science Forensics minor on student transcripts will also enhance their employment pursuits.

Question 7 for Degree Programs only, not minors or certificates.

7. For degree programs: Attach the proposed curriculum map (example formats). Use the Curriculum Map Guidelines to ensure you have addressed curriculum mapping aspects that will be reviewed by the College Curriculum and Assessment Committees (Curriculum Map Guidelines; Reviewer’s Forms).
8. Academic Catalog text and requirements:

8a. Text to be displayed in the Academic Description field in the academic catalog (max 3

paragraphs):

This minor is designed to meet the needs of students interested in exploring the social science options in forensic science but who are not in a lab-based major, such as chemistry, biology, or computer science. Scientific inquiry will be a component, however the emphasis of the minor is the application of social and behavioral sciences in forensics – such as death investigation, written/oral medico-legal reports, field/crime scene techniques and documentation, identification and evidence collection.
8b. Text (including the marketing description) to be displayed on the “Career” tab in the

academic catalog (max 3 paragraphs):



What can I do with a Social Science Forensics Minor?

This minor is interdisciplinary and integrates knowledge from several fields of study, particularly focusing on Anthropology, Criminology & Criminal Justice, but also offers perspectives from a number of other areas depending upon student interest. Students completing the minor will be better positioned to make informed decisions on areas of expertise in which they may wish to continue their education in specialized forensic programs or graduate studies if they choose. The Social Science Forensics minor is designed to give students the advantage of social science field skills and background knowledge to be able to qualify for entry level work. The Social Science Forensics minor on student transcripts will also enhance their employment pursuits.

 

8c. Text to be displayed on the “Overview” tab in the academic catalog (max 3 paragraphs):



In addition to University Requirements:


  • Complete individual plan requirements.


Please note that you may be able to use some courses to meet more than one requirement. Contact your advisor for details.


Minimum Units for Completion

18

Major GPA

C

Fieldwork Experience/Internship

Optional

8d. Plan requirements to be displayed on the “Details” tab in the academic catalog. If the plan requires an emphasis, include summary text for each emphasis:



Minor Requirements

To complete this minor, students must take a minimum of 18 units from the courses listed below, with grades of C or better.


  • ANT 255 (3 units)


Select three from (9 units):

  • CCJ 210, CCJ 350

  • ANT 410, ANT 411, ANT 430


Select two from the following (6 units):

  • CCJ 390, CCJ 480C, CCJ 495

  • GSP 239

  • PHO 406

  • SOC 339, SOC 441

  • WGS 340


A student may choose a special topics designated course (ANT or CCJ 299-399-499) or internship (ANT or CCJ 408) to fulfill credits from the elective category (course must have both forensic relevance and significant social science content, and advisor consent).

 

Be aware that some courses may have prerequisites that you must also take. For prerequisite information click on the course or see your advisor.

8e. Attributes to be displayed on the Overview tab in the academic catalog:




Required

Not Required

Optional

Recommended

Additional Admission

Requirement



Additional Admission

Requirement



Additional Admission

Requirement



Additional Admission

Requirement



Additional Fees/Program

Fees


Additional Fees/Program

Fees


Additional Fees/Program

Fees


Additional Fees/Program

Fees


Arizona Certification

/Endorsement



Arizona Certification

/Endorsement



Arizona Certification

/Endorsement



Arizona Certification

/Endorsement



Comprehensive Exam

Comprehensive Exam

Comprehensive Exam

Comprehensive Exam

Dissertation

Dissertation

Dissertation

Dissertation

Emphasis, Minor, Certificate

Emphasis, Minor, Certificate

Emphasis, Minor, Certificate

Emphasis, Minor, Certificate

Fieldwork Experience /

Internship












Foreign Language

Foreign Language

Foreign Language

Foreign Language

Legislative Internship

Legislative Internship

Legislative Internship

Legislative Internship

Oral Defense

Oral Defense

Oral Defense

Oral Defense

Research

Research

Research

Research

Study Abroad

Study Abroad

Study Abroad

Study Abroad

Student Teaching/

Supervised Teaching












Thesis

Thesis

Thesis

Thesis

9. Check all campuses where the plan will be offered:



Flagstaff

Online

Statewide

List the Statewide Campuses where the plan will be offered:

Section II

10. Impacts to Other Academic Units or Programs

10a. Projected impacts to enrollments and courses in other academic units or programs: What is the expected impact on enrollments and offerings within other academic units or programs?

10b. If other academic units or programs are impacted by this proposal, what discussions and actions have been taken for notification and/or resolution?

See attached support from: CCJ, CHM, GSP, PHO, SOC, WGS
11. Duplication or Perceived Duplication of Plan:

11a. Does this plan appear to duplicate other plans offered at Northern Arizona University?

Yes No

If so, which plan(s)?



Section III

Questions 12-15 for Undergraduate only:

12. A major is differentiated from another major by required course commonality: 18* units of the required coursework to complete the major must be unique, (i.e. not common or not dual use as a required element in another major), to that major. Does this plan have 18* units of unique required credit? Yes      No

* At least 18 required units of the major should be unique to that major to differentiate it from other majors as a guideline. Require that the distinctiveness of the degree program be evident through a well-articulated (1) Degree Program Purpose, (2) Degree Program Learning Outcomes, and (3) explanation for why the specified curriculum requirements are necessary for students to achieve the Degree Program Student Learning Outcomes as illustrated in the program’s Curriculum Map/ Matrix and narrative describing the design of the degree program curriculum. Requests for exceptions for a major with fewer than 18 required units should be prepared to articulate in addition to the requirements outlined above, how a degree program is satisfying sufficient student mastery of articulated learning outcomes in fewer than 18 required units.
13. An emphasis is differentiated from another emphasis by required course commonality: 15 units of the required coursework to complete the emphasis must be unique, (i.e. not common or not dual use as a required element in another emphasis), to that emphasis. Do the emphases each have 15 units of unique required credit? Yes      No

                                                                                                                                  

14. An undergraduate certificate is differentiated from another certificate by required course

commonality: 12 units of the required coursework to complete the certificate must be unique (i.e. not common or not dual use as a required element in another certificate), to that certificate. Does this certificate have 12 units of unique required credit? Yes     No


15. A minor is differentiated from another minor by required course commonality: 12 units of the required coursework to complete the minor must be unique, (i.e. not common or not dual use as a required element in another minor), to that minor. Does this minor have 12 units of unique required credit? Yes      No

As compared to the Anthropology Minor, the curriculum for this minor is more prescribed with a focus on forensics.  Advisor input will ensure the student signs up for targeted courses that emphasize forensic applicability.
Questions 16-19 for Graduate only:

16. Master’s degrees are differentiated from one another by required curriculum and course

commonality: at least 12 units of required coursework to complete the degree must be unique (i.e. not common or for dual use as a required element in another degree).

Does this degree contain at least 12 unique units of required credit? Yes      No


17. Emphases within a Master’s degree are differentiated by required curriculum and course

commonality: at least 9 units of required coursework to complete the emphasis must be unique (i.e. not common or not dual use as a required element in another emphasis).

Do emphases contain at least 9 unique units of required credit? Yes      No
18. If this is a non-thesis plan, does it require a minimum of 24 units of formal graded coursework?

   Yes      No

If no, explain why this proposal should be approved.

19. If this is a thesis plan, does it require a minimum of 18 units of formal graded coursework?

      Yes     No

If no, explain why this proposal should be approved.






Scott Galland



10/24/2016

Reviewed by Curriculum Process Associate

Date







Approvals:








9/27/2016

Department Chair/Unit Head (if appropriate)

Date




















Dean of College

Date

From: Harun Mehmedinovic

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