Rethinking domination and hegemony in translation international translation studies



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DID ANYONE SAY POWER?”:



RETHINKING DOMINATION

AND HEGEMONY IN TRANSLATION




INTERNATIONAL TRANSLATION STUDIES

CONFERENCE AT BANGOR UNIVERSITY

WALES, UK, 5-6 SEPTEMBER 2013


CONTACTS & MINI-BIOGRAPHIES
Özlem Berk Albachten is Associate Professor in the Department of Translation and Interpreting Studies at Boğaziçi University, Istanbul, Turkey. Her areas of research include translation history, translation and identity formation, intralingual translation, and travel writing. Her most recent publications include ‘Intralingual Translation as “Modernization” of the Language: The Turkish Case’, Perspectives: Studies in Translatology (2013), and ‘Mavi Yolculuk (Blue Voyage): A Journey of Self-Discovery during the Early Decades of the Turkish Republic (1945-1969)’, Studies in Travel Writing (2012).

e-mail: ozlem.berk@boun.edu.tr.
Roger Baines is currently Head of the School of Language and Communication Studies at the University of East Anglia. He has published on personal and ritual insults in French, the work of Pierre Mac Orlan, stage translation with an emphasis on the relationship between performance and translation, and sport and translation. His publications include: ‘A Text on Trial: the Translation and Adaptation of Adel Hakim’s Exécuteur 14’, Social Semiotics, 17(2), 2007; ‘Musical Realisations: A Performance-based Translation of Rhythm in Koltès’ Dans la Solitude des Champs de Coton’, in Baines, Marinetti, and Perteghella (eds) Staging and Performing Translation: Text and Theatre Practice, Palgrave Macmillan, 2011; ‘The Journalist, the Translator, the Player and his Agent: Games of (Mis)representation and (Mis)translation in British Media Reports about Non-anglophone Football Players’, in Wilson and Maher (eds) Words, Images and Performances in Translation, Continuum, 2011.

email: r.w.baines@uea.ac.uk
John Bates teaches Polish at Glasgow University. His research interests lie in contemporary Polish media with a particular focus on censorship after WWII. He has been Associate Editor of Blok. The International Journal of Stalinist and Post-Stalinist Culture since its inception in 2002. His most recent and forthcoming publications include: ‘Heresy and its Afterlives in Communist-Era Poland’, in Heresy and the Making of European Culture: Medieval and Modern Perspectives (Farnham: Ashgate, 2013) and ‘The Censorship of English Literature in People’s Poland, 1948-1967’, in Censorship across Borders: The Censorship of English Literature in Twentieth-Century Europe (Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2011).

email: john.bates@glasgow.ac.uk
Caterina Briguglia works as a part time Lecturer at Pompeu Fabra University in Barcelona in Spain, where she also completed her PhD in Translation and Philology. Her thesis, entitled Dialect Translation in Contemporary Catalan Literature (Translations of Pasolini, Gadda and Camilleri) focuses on the translation of dialects in literature with particular attention to translation norms in the Catalan polysystem. She currently works on the topic of the translation of style by focusing on Catalan versions of Italian literature, and she also investigates the topic of activism in translation with special interest in writers and translators during the Fascist regime.

email: caterina.briguglia@upf.edu
Jean-François Brunelière is a graduate of the Ecole Nationale des Travaux Publics de l’Etat (National Civil Engineering School of Lyon), France, where he also worked for eight years as an engineer. He is currently living in Brazil and is taking a Masters in Translation Studies at the Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina in Florianópolis. His project is on language management and translation in multinational companies. He is currently focusing on French car manufacturers in Brazil. His academic adviser is translation studies specialist José Lambert.

email: bruneliere@hotmail.com
Paola Brusasco teaches English Language and Translation at the University of Torino. After her PhD, which brought together postcolonial studies and translation studies, she has carried out research on translation and on issues of power and identity in language. Her publications include the monographs Approaching Translation. Theoretical and Practical Issues (2013), Writing Within/Without/About Sri Lanka. Discourses of Cartography, History and Translation in Selected Works by Michael Ondaatje and Carl Muller (2010), and some articles. She has translated literary texts, ranging from classics (E. Brontë’s Wuthering Heights, R. L. Stevenson’s Olalla) to works by contemporary authors (R. Banks and C. Whitehead).

email: paola.brusasco@unito.it
Dr Cristina Caimotto is researcher in English Language and Translation at the University of Turin in Italy. Her main areas of research are news translation, political discourse, advertising discourse and ecolinguistics, with a particular interest in the corpus-aided discourse analysis of information in English and Italian. Her main publications include: ‘Translating Foreign Articles with Local Implications: A Case Study’ in Schäffner and Bassnett (eds) Political Discourse, Media and Translation (2010), and ‘Global Distribution of Secondary News: A Case Study’ in Cagliero and Jenkins (eds.) Discourses, Communities, and Global English (2010), and ‘Anglicisms in Italian as Alerts to Greenwashing: A Case Study’ in CADAAD (2011) (co-authored).

email: mariacristina.caimotto@unito.it
Alessandra Calvani was born and educated in Rome. She is a literary translator from English into Italian and a prize-winning writer of short novels and poems. She earned an academic degree in Modern Languages, an MA degree in Marketing and Web Communication and a European doctoral degree in Comparative Literature and Translation Studies. She published extensively on literary translation and she worked as Adjunct Professor of Translation Studies at Roma Tor Vergata University and Macerata University. At present she is Adjunct Professor at Urbino University in Italy.

email: alessandra.calvani@gmail.com
Sinkwan Cheng is Associate Professor of General Education at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. She is the editor of Law, Justice, and Power: Between Reason and Will (Stanford University Press). Contributors to this volume include Julia Kristeva, Slavoj Žižek, J. Hillis Miller, Alain Badiou, Nancy Fraser, and Ernesto Laclau. Her writings have also appeared in MLNCardozo Law Review, American Journal of Semiotics, Law and Literature, and Literature and Psychology. Besides publishing in refereed journals and books in the United States, the UK, Canada, and Russia, she has written articles for edited volumes in France and Germany. In addition to her teaching experience in New York, Berlin, and Hong Kong, she has given faculty seminars in many countries worldwide. Over the past thirteen years, she has been awarded external fellowships and grants in several countries in Europe and North America.

email: sinkwancheng@gmail.com
Jinsil Choi is a PhD researcher at the University of Leicester. Her research interests are corpus-based translation, discourse analysis and English language teaching methodology with translation. She published the Korean translations of Discourse and the Translator by Basil Hatim and Ian Mason and Linguistics and the Language of Translation by Kirsten Malmkjaer.

email: jc485@leicester.ac.uk
Peter Davies is Professor of Modern German Studies at the University of Edinburgh. He has published books on the Soviet influence on early East German cultural policy, the periodisation of German literary history in the Twentieth Century (with Stephen Parker and Matthew Philpotts), and on the reception of Johann Jakob Bachofen’s theory of matriarchy in German culture. He is currently engaged in a collaborative research project on the translation of Holocaust testimonies.

email: pdavies1@staffmail.ed.ac.uk
Christina Delistathi has been teaching translation theory and practice for a number of years. She completed her PhD on the Greek translations of the Communist Manifesto and has published on the topics of power and ideology in translation in relation to counter-hegemonic political institutions, on translation criticism, on the Marxist discourse, as well as on the Greek ‘language question’ and the Communist Party of Greece. Currently she is working on the project Activist Subtitlers and the Greek Crisis. She currently works at Brunel University.

email: christina.delistathi@brunel.ac.uk
Dr Dongning Feng lectures in Chinese and Translation and Interpreting Studies at Salford University. He has taught translation, interpreting and other subjects including information technology for translation, film studies, cross-cultural communication in China, Japan and Britain. His research interests include literary translation, translation of political texts and audio-visual translation.

email: d.feng@salford.ac.uk
Eleonora Fois graduated in Literary Translation at the University of Cagliari, Italy. She works in the translation field, deepening her knowledge of literary and audiovisual translation, both in theory

and practice. She collaborated with Salani Publishing House for the translation of a book and worked on Italian adaptations of South Park (which also resulted in an academic publication). She is now a PhD student in Literary and Philological Studies at the University of Cagliari, where she is working on the translation of dramatic texts. Her other fields of interest include women’s studies and Sardinian literary production.



email: parlanchina21@yahoo.it
Lynne Franjié is an Associate Professor at Stendhal-Grenoble 3 University, France. She is currently Vice-President in charge of education and student affairs. She holds a PhD in Lexicology, Multilingual Terminology, and Translation. She conducts her research in translation studies and has published a number of books and papers in the field, among which Traduction dans les Dictionnaires Bilingues (Translation in Bilingual Dictionaries, Éditions Le Manuscrit, 2009).

email: parlanchina21@yahoo.it
Hiroko Furukawa completed her PhD in Literary Translation at the University of East Anglia in 2011. Her research interests are translation and ideology, translation theory and practice, and gender in translation. She works as a Lecturer in Translation and Communication Studies at the Department of English, Tohoku Gakuin University, Japan. Her publications include ‘Rendering Female Speech as a Male or Female Translator: Constructed Femininity in the Japanese Translations of Pride and Prejudice and Bridget Jones’s Diary’ (2010. Translation: Theory and Practice in Dialogue, London: Continuum) and ‘A Feminist Woman with a Given Female Language: A Contradictory Figure in the Japanese Translation of Margaret Atwood’s The Edible Woman’ (2012. Babel. 58(2): 220–235). She has experience in book editing.

email: f.hiroko@tscc.tohoku-gakuin.ac.jp
Mehdi Ghobadi is the editor in chief of the journal L’atittude, translator, playwright, and an interdisciplinary researcher. He received an MA and a BA in Translation Studies from Islamic Azad University, South Tehran Branch, Iran. His main research interests are creative writing, literary translation, cultural studies, Celtic studies, translation of dramatic symbolism and William Butler Yeats. He has published several papers and delivered many lectures on the aforementioned themes.

email: modares_translator@yahoo.com
Dr Katiliina Gielen is a Lecturer at the Department of English Language and Literature and a Research Fellow at the Centre of Translation studies, University of Tartu, Estonia. Her main fields of interest in translation studies are descriptive translation studies, totalitarian translation, gender related issues in translation, and comparative historical translation research.

email: katiliina.gielen@ut.ee
Marcello Giugliano works as part time Lecturer for the Faculty of Translation of the Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona, Spain. His doctorate, awarded by the Department of Translation and Language Sciences of the Universitat Pompeu Fabra, dealt with the study of mimesis of orality in translation by focusing on Italian and Catalan versions of Robert Frost’s poems. His current research interests are translational stylistics, activism and censorship in translation. His ongoing research projects include a study of Italian translators belonging to the group of intellectuals known as americanisti. More in particular he investigates the agency of these translators in the introduction and diffusion of the poetics of high modernity in Italy during and immediately after the Second World War.

email: caterina.briguglia@upf.edu
Dr Cristina Gómez Castro is currently a Lecturer of English at the University of Cantabria, Spain, where she teaches ESP, Methodology and English Phonetics for Teachers. Her main research interests are the theory and methodology of translation, and more precisely, within the field of DTS, the study of the interaction between ideology and translation and the way (self)censorship is present in the rewritings of texts. She wrote her dissertation on the topic of translation and censorship under Franco’s Spain and she has published on the topic in several journals and books. She has undertaken several research stays, both pre-doctoral, in the Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium) and the University of Aston, Birmingham (UK), and post-doctoral, in the University of Lisbon (Portugal) and in Sheffield Hallam University (UK).

email: cristina.gomez@unican.es
Nadia Ali Hamad Salous works as a translator in the Public Relations Department of An-Najah National University, Autonomous Palestinian Territories. She holds a BA in English Literature and an MA in Applied Linguistics and Translation with a thesis entitled Abu-Dib’s translation of Orientalism: A Critical Study, both from An-Najah National University. She has also worked as a university lecturer between 2006 and 2013.

email: nadia_hamad@hotmail.com
Isis Herrero is a PhD researcher at Universidad de Salamanca, Spain. Her dissertation is the first research project that deals with the Spanish reception of Native American literature, a transcultural rendering that Herrero has studied from an identity perspective. Isis Herrero has participated so far in ten international conferences and has co-edited with Todd Klaiman the Selected Papers of the CETRA Research Seminar in Translation Studies 2011.

email: isish@usal.es
Jordi Jané-Lligé has taught German Language, Literature and Culture at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain, since 2008. He is also a member of the research group GETCC (Grup d’Estudi de la Traducció Catalana Contemporània) at the same university. In 2006 he received his doctorate from the Universitat Pompeu Fabra with a thesis on the reception of Heinrich Böll’s work in Spain. He is also a translator and has translated the following authors from German into Spanish or Catalan: Elfriede Jelinek, Gerhard Meier, Andrea Maria Schenkel, Johanna Adorján, Charlotte Roche, Saša Stanisič and Iris Hanika. His research interests focus on both the study of postwar literature, specifically reception and translation, and the elaboration of a model of description of translated narratives.

email: jordi.jane@uab.cat
Ika Kaminka was trained as an art historian and works as a translator of English and Japanese literature into Norwegian. She has translated Murakami for twelve years, in addition to Natsume Soseki, Takashi Hiraide, Hiromi Ito and others. Kaminka was president of the Norwegian Translators’ Association during 2008-2010. She was awarded the Bastian prize for outstanding translation for her rendering of 1Q84. She is based in Oslo, Norway.

email: ika@kaminka.no
Zola Kell is a graduate student in Germanic Studies at the University of Victoria in Canada. Her thesis entitled Inhabiting the Third Space: Cultural Meaning in Translating Select Works by May Ayim and Emine Sevgi Özdamar draws from the works of Homi K. Bhabha, Helené Cixous, Fernando Ortiz, and Doris Bachmann-Medick, and applies their theories to create a new workspace in which translation as a process of cultural exchange can be explored and analyzed. She would like to build an interdisciplinary network between Modern Language Departments worldwide to foster deeper communication and connection, while remaining critically aware of the repercussions inherent to globalization.

email: zkell@uvic.ca
Henry Kelly is a PhD student in the Department of Religions, Theology and Ecumenics at Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. His thesis examines the relationship between economic, ethical and civic perspectives on value, focusing on the work of Axel Honneth and Paul Ricoeur. He has a Master’s degree in economics from Edinburgh University which included a dissertation on the institutional background to property rights in transition economies and a Bachelor’s degree in economics from Trinity College Dublin.

email: kellyhe@tcd.ie
Youngshin Kim is currently Assistant Professor at the Department of Tourism and English Interpretation at Anyang University, Korea. A conference interpreter and practicing translator, Kim earned her doctoral degree in translation studies from Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, Seoul. Her research interest lies in translation sociology, translation and ideology, and translation criticism. She has translated three books, including Women and Power (2010).

email: shiny@anyang.ac.kr
Dr Andrzej Jan Kutylowski obtained social science degrees from universities or institutions of higher learning in Warsaw, Essex, Vienna and Hamburg in social science data analysis and sociology. He was the recipient of a number of pre- and post-doctoral fellowships and research stipends, funded among others by the Konrad Adenauer Stiftung, the International Peace Research Institute (Oslo), the Woodraw Wilson International Center for Scholars, and the Nordic Ministerial Council. His research interests and publications have focused on the modelling of categorical response data, with and without latent variables, and on cross-period and cross-country empirical analyses of conflicts and societal change. This included co-authorship of a national-level survey on favouritism and corruption in Poland, co-authorship of two national-level surveys concerning the Solidarity labour union, and authorship of a fairly recent comprehensive inter-temporal study of corruption phenomena in Poland.

email: andrzejk@ulrik.uio.no
Dr Saihong Li is currently employed as Lecturer in Interpreting and Translation Studies with focus on Chinese at the University of Salford. Between 2005 and 2010 she worked at the University of Copenhagen and the Copenhagen Business School (Denmark) while pursuing her doctoral research. Since September 2010, when she was appointed lecturer at the University of Salford, she has been actively engaged in research and research administration. In 2011 she was nominated as chair of the Research Ethics Committee at the College of Art and Social Science. She also acts as a programme leader for UWLP (the University-wide language programme) at Salford.

email: s.rasmussen@salford.ac.uk
Bai Liping is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Translation of The Chinese University of Hong Kong. His recent publications include ‘Translator Studies: Liang Shiqiu’s Discourse on Translation’ (Across Languages and Cultures, 2011), ‘Patronage as “a Productive Network” in Translation: A Case Study in China’ (Perspectives: Studies in Translatology, 2009).

email: bailiping@arts.cuhk.edu.hk
Sergio Lobejón Santos has been working as an Assistant Teacher at the Departamento de Filología at the University of Cantabria, Spain, since November 2009. He is currently writing up his PhD dissertation on the effects of censorship on the translations of poetry written in English during Franco’s Spain. This work is part of the collaborative inter-institutional TRACE (TRAnslations CEnsored) Research Project.

email: sergio.lobejon@unican.es
Dr Marion Löffler has worked at the Centre for Advanced Welsh and Celtic Studies, University of Wales, Aberystwyth, UK, since 1994, during which time she has published widely on the linguistic and cultural history of bilingual Wales in its Celtic and European context between 1789 and 1945. Her most recent volume is Welsh Responses to the French Revolution: Press and Public Discourse, 1789–1802 (Cardiff: UWP, 2012). She originally graduated in linguistics from Berlin and she is a fluent Welsh-speaker

email: marion.loeffler@cymru.ac.uk
Danica Maleková is a Lecturer at the Department of English Language and Literature, Catholic University, Ruzomberok, Slovakia. From 2005 to 2011 she worked as a translator and later as an administrator in the European Commission. In 2010 she gained her PhD from the Masaryk University in Brno, Czech Republic, with a dissertation entitled The Genre of Institutional Press Release – A Critical Discourse Analysis. Her main teaching and research areas include stylistics, critical discourse analysis and translation. Apart from a series of articles, she is the author and co-author of several textbooks for students on both English for specific purposes and English philology, including Basics of Translation (2004).

email: danicamalekova60@gmail.com

Megan McDowell is a doctoral student at the University of Zürich, Switzerland, and has a Masters in Humanities from the University of Texas, Dallas, United States. Her translations include works by Alejandro Zambra, Arturo Fontaine, Carlos Busqued, Álvaro Bisama, and Juan Emar.

email: meganalice@gmail.com
Burcin K. Mustafa obtained a BA degree in Arabic and International Relations at the University of Westminster. He then enrolled on a Master’s course in the theory and practice of translation. After having learnt about the theoretical complexities of translation, he enrolled on a PhD research programme into the political influences on the translation process within the post 9/11 conflicts. He also teaches an MA course in translation technology at SOAS, University of London.

email: 240656@soas.ac.uk
Bentolhoda Nakhaei is a PhD candidate in Translation Studies at Université Sorbonne-Nouvelle, Paris, France. He holds a BA in English Language and Literature from the University of Isfahan, Iran, and an MA in Translation Studies French from the University of Shahid Beheshti, Tehran, Iran. His research interests include the Iranian poet Omar Khayyam and his Quatrains. He is an experienced teacher of Persian and English.

email: nakhaeihoda@gmail.com
Martin Nordeborg is an Associate Professor at the Department of Languages and Literatures, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. His PhD thesis dealt with the first Japanese primary school reader, published in 1873, which was in fact a translation of an American primer. In the framework of the nation-building process it was interesting to see the role of this book and especially how religious concepts were translated at a time when freedom of religion had just been announced the same year. In 2011 he participated in the “Research Exchange Symposium on Cultural Translations: Research on Japanese Literature in Northern Europe” at The International Research Center for Japanese Studies in Kyoto and presented a paper entitled ‘Translation of Christian Concepts in Meiji Japan’.

email: martin.nordeborg@sprak.gu.se
Dr Pilar Ordóñez-López is a Lecturer in Translation studies at the Universitat Jaume I in Castellón de la Plana, Spain. Her research interests include the history of translation, translation theory and corpus-based translation studies, and she has published widely in these areas. Among her most significant and recent works ranges a study of the influence of Ortega y Gasset’s vision of translation on contemporary translation studies and work devoted to the analysis of translation anthologies.

email: mordonez@trad.uji.es
Agnieszka Pantuchowicz teaches gender studies and translation studies at the University of Social Sciences and Humanities in Warsaw, Poland. She has published numerous articles on theoretical aspects of translation and on cultural ideological dimensions of translation in the Polish context. She is also engaged in research within the field of gender studies and the work of contemporary Polish women writers.

email: apantuchowicz@swps.edu.pl
Dr Ocksue Park was born in Seoul, Korea. She is currently working as an Associate Professor in the college of Liberal Arts at Yeungnam University. She obtained a BA from Sungkyunkwan University in Korea and an MA in Language Teaching and Translation Studies from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. She studied for a PhD in Translation Studies at the University of Auckland, focusing on translation teaching in South Korea. Her major research fields are translation theory and the analysis of literary translation. She has 20 years of experience as a translator.

email: ocksue@hanmail.net
Barbara Pausch received her MA in German Studies (minor in Linguistics) from the University of Colorado at Boulder, United States, and her BA in English Linguistics (majors in German and English Philology) from the University of Regensburg, Germany. She is currently working on her PhD in Translation Studies at the University of Alberta, Canada and at the Ludwig-Maximilans-Universität Munich, Germany. Her interdisciplinary dissertation examines the translation of Anglo-Canadian short stories into German, with particular focus on short story anthologies.

email: barbara.pausch@ualberta.ca
Meng Pei works as a Lecturer at the School of Foreign Languages, Shanghai Institute of Foreign Trade, China. She has obtained her MA and PhD degrees in the field of translation studies respectively at the Universities of Birmingham and Edinburgh. Her research interests are within the areas of translation as a socio-cultural activity and approaching translation from sociologically-oriented perspectives. She has been teaching courses on translation theory, Chinese-English translation, contrastive studies and translation, as well as stylistics both for postgraduate and undergraduate students.

email: applemeng@hotmail.com
Paria Rahimian is a Lecturer at the Islamic Azad University, South Tehran Branch, Iran, and an MA student in translation studies. She holds a BA in English Translation from Islamic Azad University, Nourcity Branch. Her main research interests are cultural studies and commercial translation.

email: modares_translator@yahoo.com
Daniel Raveh is Associate Professor at the Department of Philosophy, Tel Aviv University, Israel. He thinks and writes on Indian and comparative philosophy, and translation. He is the author of Exploring the Yogasūtra: Philosophy and Translation (Continuum Press 2012), co-editor of Contrary Thinking: Selected Essays by Daya Krishna (OUP 2011), and the Hebrew translator of the Yogasūtra (Hakibbutz Hameuchad 2010) and RK Narayan's Mahabharata (Babel Publishers 2000).

email: daniraveh@gmail.com
Remo Reginold is a doctoral candidate in Translation Studies at Cardiff University (supervisor: Prof. Alexis Nuselovici) in Wales, UK. His main interests are the sociology of knowledge, intellectual history, translation studies as well as South Asia (and Sri Lanka). He attempts to re-trace cultural studies and its knowledge production by considering its political implications. The study of reception strategies in Tamil intellectual and cultural history is another realm of research. He was a research fellow at the Centre for Just Peace and Democracy (CJPD) in Geneva, Switzerland. He is currently an affiliated scholar with the Centre of South Asian Studies, University of Cambridge. Since 2012 he is Fellow of the FMSH (Research-unit Non-lieux de l’exil) in Paris. Furthermore, he is a translator and president of the academic society FVGL. He holds a BA in Political Science (University of Geneva), an MA in Philosophy (University of Lucerne) and an MA in Theology (University of Lucerne).

email: remo.reginold@gmx.ch
Jonathan Ross was born in London. He works as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Translation and Interpreting Studies at Boğaziçi University, Istanbul, Turkey. He studied German and Politics at the University of Edinburgh, and went on to do a doctorate in East German Literature at King’s College London. His research interests include community interpreting in Turkey, informal interpreting, subtitling, the translation of songs, and the translation of film titles, on which he is writing the first ever book-length study. He has published in The Translator and Target and has an article forthcoming in Across Languages and Cultures.

email: jonathan.ross@boun.edu.tr
Nursaule Maksutkyzy Rsaliyeva works as an Associate Professor at Suleiman Demirel University in Almaty, Kazakhstan. Her main research fields are contrastive linguistics, translation studies, intercultural communication, journalism, and stylistics of the Kazakh, Russian and English languages. Her dissertation was on the theme of ‘A Theoretical-Scholarly Basis of Transliterating Kazakh Onomastic Names in the English Language’. She has published more than 40 journalistic articles and interviews besides academic publications.

email: nursauler@yahoo.com
Maria Sidiropoulou is Professor of Translation Studies in the Faculty of English, School of Philosophy, University of Athens, Greece. She was president of the inter-university and inter-faculty co-ordinating committee of the Translation-Translatology MA Programme in 2009-2011 and director of the Language and Linguistics Department of the Faculty of English in 2004-2006. Her recent publications deal with intercultural issues manifested through translation in the press, in advertising, in EU documentation, in literature, on stage and screen.

e-mail: midirop@enl.uoa.gr
Zoë Skoulding is a poet, translator, editor and critic. She is Senior Lecturer in the School of English at Bangor University and has been editor of the international quarterly Poetry Wales since 2008. She has published four collections of poetry, including The Museum of Disappearing Sounds (Seren, 2013) and Remains of a Future City (Seren, 2008), poems from which have been widely translated. Her own translations include a collection by the Luxembourgish poet Jean Portante, In Reality (Seren, 2013). From 2009 to 2011 she was, in partnership with Literature Across Frontiers, director of Metropoetica, a collaborative project on translation, gender and city space. Her critical monograph, Contemporary Women’s Poetry and Urban Space: Experimental Cities, is forthcoming in 2013 with Palgrave Macmillan. She is a member of the collective Parking Non-Stop, whose CD Species Corridor, combining experimental soundscape with poetry and song, was released on the German label Klangbad in 2008.

email: z.skoulding@bangor.ac.uk
Dr Agnieszka Stępkowska is a Lecturer at the School of English, University of Social Sciences in Warsaw, Poland. Her research interests focus on translation studies, multilingualism, and the sociology of language. Her recently published book is entitled Multilingualism and English: The Canton of Zurich as a Linguistic Paradigm, Warsaw Studies in English Language and Literature, Vol. 14, Frankfurt am Main & New York: Peter Lang Verlag, 2013 [Pp. 411].

email: ast@san.edu.pl
Xiaofei Sun works on a PhD at the University of Nottingham. Her main research focus is on non-localized ST on business to consumer (B2C) commercial websites of multinational IT companies between English and Chinese. She analyses intentionally untranslated SL as a localization strategy by taking advantage of the nature of website localization to rationalize the following stance: to discuss the possibility of domestic value interruption through localization in the light of visible foreignness as a cultural appeal.

email: arxxs5@nottingham.ac.uk
Corine Tachtiris currently teaches French and Translation Studies at Kalamazoo College. From September 2013, she will be a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Translation at Hampshire College, Amherst, United States. Her research is located at the intersection of world literature with translation studies, postcolonial studies, and gender studies, often with a paratextual emphasis. She is also a translator of contemporary literature by Haitian and Czech women.

email: tachtco@umich.edu
Shivangini Tandon holds an MPhil from the Department of History, University of Delhi, India. As part of her research, she looked at the role of power, norms of masculinity and issues of comportment in the structuring of the Mughal court culture in the 17th and 18th century. She has also worked with Oxford University Press in India. She has presented papers in various conferences and seminars. Many of her poems and articles have been published in magazines like the Humanist Outlook and in national newspapers of India like The Times of India and the Hindustan Times.

email: shivangini.history@gmail.com
Anna Rose Thomas is a doctoral candidate at the University of Seville, Spain, in English-Spanish Translation and Intercultural Studies. Her doctoral thesis deals with the theme of ‘Translation, Reception and Censorship of U.S. Countercultural Authors in Franco’s Spain’. She is a member of the research group ‘Translation Theory, Practice and Pedagogy of Translation in Language Studies’ at the University of Seville.

email: annarosethomas@gmail.com
Roman Vater is a PhD student in Middle Eastern studies at the University of Manchester. He holds an MA in Cultural Studies from Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland and a BA in Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies from Tel-Aviv University, Israel. He is a literary translator from Russian to Hebrew, member of the editorial board of the literary review journal Emda, and co-editor of the literary-political review Mit’an.

email: romans.vaters@manchester.ac.uk
Laura Vegara Fabregat is a PhD candidate at the Department of Translation and Interpreting at the University of Murcia in Spain. Her research specialisms include legal translation, legal metaphor and cognitive linguistics. She holds a BA in Translation & Interpreting and an MA in English and Spanish for Specific Purposes from the University of Alicante, Spain. She also has experience in working as a legal translator.

email: lvegara@um.es
Anastasia Vitsiou works as a freelance translator, proofreader, localiser and subtitler within the following main areas of expertise in Greek, English, French and Italian: 1) Marketing, Business, Economics and Advertisement, 2) Technology, CIT, 3) Medicine, Pharmacology, Cosmetics, 4) Political Science, 5) Subtitling. She holds a BA (Hons) in Foreign Languages, Translation and Interpreting with specialisation in financial, political, legal and technical translation from English and French into Greek and vice versa from Ionian University, Corfu, Greece. She also holds an MA (Hons) in International Studies from the University of Sheffield. During her postgraduate studies, she focused on policy issues related to the theory and practice of international relations, international law, human rights, wars, and the relationship between the United States and Israel.

email: anvitsiou@gmail.com
Sonia Weiner is a Lecturer at the Department of English and American Studies at Tel Aviv University in Israel. Her fields of interest include migration and minority studies, visual culture and African American literature. She is currently working on a book project in the field of migratory aesthetics, which focuses on translations of migrant perspectives into innovative art and narratological forms. Sonia, who is herself a migrant between cultures and languages, has written the introduction to the Hebrew translation of W.E.B. Du Bois’s The Souls of Black Folk.

email: snooch65@gmail.com
Heather Williams, a modern languages graduate, has worked at the University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh and Celtic Studies since 2007, where she has specialized on the postcolonial cultures of Brittany and Wales, and translation. Her pioneering volume Postcolonial Brittany: Literature Between Languages (Oxford: Peter Lang, 2007) devotes much attention to translation.

email: h.williams@wales.ac.uk
Erica Wilson is an MA student in Communication Studies at Wilfrid Laurier University (WLU) in Canada. During her undergraduate degree at the University of Toronto, she majored in linguistics and English as result of her interest in studying language. At WLU, she brings this interest into her studies and her research on the influence of the Oxford English Dictionary on the ever-evolving English language.

email: wils5210@mylaurier.ca
Jenny Wong is currently a PhD candidate in Literature and Theology at the University of Glasgow, UK. She taught translation and applied ethics at Beijing Normal University, Hong Kong Baptist University and United International College from 2008 to 2012. Professionally trained in areas of commercial and media translation, her research interests lie in the study of the Bible and English literature which grew out of her two postgraduate degrees: an MA in Translating and Interpreting (Newcastle, UK) and an MA in Christian Studies (CUHK). She is the founder of SELBL, www.selbl.org, a non-profit organisation based in Hong Kong that promotes the English Bible to many countries in the world. Her most recently published translation is Meeting Jesus Again for the First Time by Marcus Borg.

email: y.wong.1@research.gla.ac.uk
Hunam Yun received MA and PhD degrees in Translation Studies at the University of Warwick, UK. She is currently teaching translation studies at Hongik University in South Korea and also working as a translator. She has published many papers in the field of translation studies and many literary translations in Korea. She has been teaching translation studies since 2001.

email: hnyun@hotmail.com
Anna Zielinska-Elliott is a prize-winning translator of modern Japanese literature into Polish. She has translated Yukio Mishima, Banana Yoshimoto, and most of the work of Haruki Murakami. Educated in Poland and Japan, she holds a PhD in Japanese literature from the University of Warsaw, Poland. She teaches Japanese language, literature, and translation at Boston University, United States. 

email: aelliott@bu.edu
Adam Antoni Zulawnik graduated from the University of Auckland, New Zealand, where he completed a BA in Japanese and Korean Studies. In 2012, Adam completed combined Honours (First Class) in Japanese and Korean Studies at Monash University, Australia. His Honours thesis, Hate Translation Wave: Translation of Controversial Texts for Scholarly Purposes was awarded a Monash-Warwick University writing-up prize. Adam is currently a PhD (translation) candidate at Monash University where he is continuing research focusing on risk and ethics in the translation of ‘controversial’ texts.

email: aazul3@student.monash.edu
Cornelia Zwischenberger holds an MA in Translation and Interpreting Studies from the University of Graz as well as a PhD in Interpreting Studies from the University of Vienna in Austria. She currently has a post-doctoral research position at the Center for Translation Studies, University of Vienna, where she is actively involved in teaching and research.

email: cornelia.zwischenberger@univie.ac.at




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