Research project : dr jon patricios



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RESEARCH PROJECT : DR JON PATRICIOS (Concussion epidemiology)

Search for: limit 14 to yr="2005 -Current"


Results: 1-58
Database: Ovid MEDLINE(R) <1950 to November Week 3 2009>

Search Strategy:

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1 exp Brain Concussion/ep [Epidemiology] (235)

2 symptoms.mp. (437204)

3 exp brain concussion/ (3689)

4 concuss$.tw. or 3 (4806)

5 2 and 4 (628)

6 1 or 5 (809)

7 limit 6 to (english language and ("child (6 to 12 years)" or "adolescent (13 to 18 years)")) (297)

8 concuss$.ti. and 7 (103)

9 south africa/ and 1 (2)

10 limit 9 to english language (2)

11 exp *brain concussion/ and 7 (185)

12 8 and 11 (100)

13 9 or 12 (101)

14 from 13 keep 1-82 (82)

15 limit 14 to yr="2005 -Current" (58)

16 from 15 keep 1-58 (58)
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Result <1>

Unique Identifier

16816151


Status

MEDLINE


Authors

Van Kampen DA. Lovell MR. Pardini JE. Collins MW. Fu FH.

Authors Full Name

Van Kampen, Derk A. Lovell, Mark R. Pardini, Jamie E. Collins, Michael W. Fu, Freddie H.

Institution

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands.

Title

The "value added" of neurocognitive testing after sports-related concussion.[see comment].



Comments

Comment in: Clin J Sport Med. 2007 Sep;17(5):435-6; PMID: 17873562

Source

American Journal of Sports Medicine. 34(10):1630-5, 2006 Oct.



Abstract

BACKGROUND: Neurocognitive testing has been endorsed as a "cornerstone" of concussion management by recent Vienna and Prague meetings of the Concussion in Sport Group. Neurocognitive testing is important given the potential unreliability of athlete self-report after injury. Relying only on athletes' reports of symptoms may result in premature return of athletes to contact sport, potentially exposing them to additional injury. HYPOTHESIS: Use of computer-based neurocognitive testing results in an increased capacity to detect postconcussive abnormalities after injury. STUDY DESIGN: Case control study; Level of evidence, 3. METHODS: High school and college athletes with a diagnosed concussion were tested 2 days after injury. Postinjury neurocognitive performance (Immediate Postconcussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing) and symptom (postconcussion symptom) scores were compared with preinjury (baseline) scores and with those of an age- and education-matched noninjured athlete!

control group. "Abnormal" test performance was determined statistically with Reliable Change Index scores. RESULTS: Sixty-four percent of concussed athletes reported a significant increase in symptoms, as judged by postconcussion symptom scores, compared with preinjury baseline at 2 days after injury. Eighty-three percent of the concussed sample demonstrated significantly poorer neurocognitive test results relative to their own baseline performance. The addition of neurocognitive testing resulted in a net increase in sensitivity of 19%. Ninety-three percent of the sample had either abnormal neurocognitive test results or a significant increase in symptoms, relative to their own baseline; 30% of a control group demonstrated either abnormalities in neurocognitive testing or elevated symptoms, as judged by postconcussion symptom scores. For the concussed group, use of symptom and neurocognitive test results resulted in an increased yield of 29% overreliance on symptoms alone.!

In contrast, 0% of the control group had both symptoms and abnormal n

eurocognitive testing. CONCLUSION: Reliance on patients' self-reported symptoms after concussion is likely to result in underdiagnosis of concussion and may result in premature return to play. Neurocognitive testing increases diagnostic accuracy when used in conjunction with self-reported symptoms.

Publication Type

Controlled Clinical Trial. Journal Article.
Result <2>

Unique Identifier

17361669

Status


MEDLINE

Authors


Lovell MR. Iverson GL. Collins MW. Podell K. Johnston KM. Pardini D. Pardini J. Norwig J. Maroon JC.

Authors Full Name

Lovell, Mark R. Iverson, Grant L. Collins, Michael W. Podell, Kenneth. Johnston, Karen M. Pardini, Dustin. Pardini, Jamie. Norwig, John. Maroon, Joseph C.

Institution

UPMC Center for Sports Medicine; 3200 South Water Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15203, USA. lovellmr@upmc.edu

Title


Measurement of symptoms following sports-related concussion: reliability and normative data for the post-concussion scale.

Source


Applied Neuropsychology. 13(3):166-74, 2006.

Abstract


It is important to carefully evaluate self-reported symptoms in athletes with known or suspected concussions. This article presents data on the psychometric and clinical properties of a commonly used concussion symptom inventory-the Post-Concussion Scale. Normative and psychometric data are presented for large samples of young men (N = 1,391) and young women (N = 355). In addition, data gathered from a concussed sample of athletes (N = 260) seen within 5 days of injury are presented. These groups represent samples of both high school and collegiate athletes. Data from a subsample of 52 concussed athletes seen 3 times post-injury are presented to illustrate symptom reporting patterns during the initial recovery period. General guidelines for the clinical use of the scale are provided.

Publication Type

Journal Article.
Result <3>

Unique Identifier

18585890

Status


MEDLINE

Authors


Shuttleworth-Rdwards AB. Radloff SE.

Authors Full Name

Shuttleworth-Rdwards, Ann B. Radloff, Sarah E.

Institution

Department of Psychology, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa. a.edwards@ru.ac.za

Title


Compromised visuomotor processing speed in players of Rugby Union from school through to the national adult level.

Source


Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology. 23(5):511-20, 2008 Sep.

Abstract


The aim of this study was to investigate the residual effects of concussion amongst players of Rugby Union from school through to the national adult level, with pre-season testing on tests of visuomotor processing speed (Digit Symbol; Trail Making Test A and B). Comparison groups included 124 male rugby players versus 102 non-contact sport controls; 71 forward versus 53 backline players. Across groups there was equivalence for age, education, estimated IQ, and hand motor dexterity. There was a significantly higher percentage of rugby players with 2+ concussions than controls. Poorer performance was in evidence for rugby players compared with controls on all tests of visuomotor speed, and for forward versus backline players on Digit Symbol, with clinically relevant medium effect sizes. The results implicate vulnerability amongst rugby players on the prototypically sensitive function of visuomotor processing in association with years of exposure to repetitive concussive and !

subconcussive injury.

Publication Type

Comparative Study. Journal Article. Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't.


Result <4>

Unique Identifier

16682158

Status


MEDLINE

Authors


Nacajauskaite O. Endziniene M. Jureniene K. Schrader H.

Authors Full Name

Nacajauskaite, Olga. Endziniene, Milda. Jureniene, Kristina. Schrader, Harald.

Institution

Center of Pediatric Surgery, Vilnius University Children's Hospital, Santariskiu 7, Vilnius, Lithuania. olgutene@takas.lt

Title


The validity of post-concussion syndrome in children: a controlled historical cohort study.

Source


Brain & Development. 28(8):507-14, 2006 Sep.

Abstract


The aim of this controlled historical cohort study was to assess the validity of post-concussion syndrome in children. We identified 301 children aged 4-15 years who had sustained an isolated brain concussion, and another group of 301 children who sustained any other mild body injury excluding the head. Parents from both groups filled in standardized questionnaires containing questions about the health condition of the children: headache, neck pain, dizziness, malaise, fatigability, exercise or noise intolerance, irritability, weepiness, sadness, anxiety, nocturnal enuresis, tics, sleep disorders, memory or learning difficulties, hyperactivity, seizures, attention disorder, buzzing in the ears, subjective parental concerns about the child's health condition, and parental concerns about their child having a brain disorder. The severity of the complaints was rated on the Visual Analogue Scale. After the final exclusion, 102 pairs strictly matched by sex, age, and the date of!

trauma were analyzed. The differences of parental complaints about the health condition of their children between case and control groups were statistically insignificant for all symptoms, except parental concerns about their child having brain damage which were significantly higher in the case group. The likelihood of parental concerns about the possibility of their child having brain damage was 2.7 times higher in the case group. Headache, learning difficulties, and sleep disorders were significant variables predicting the concerns. These results question the validity of the post-concussion syndrome in children.

Publication Type

Comparative Study. Journal Article. Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't. Validation Studies.


Result <5>

Unique Identifier

16537266

Status


MEDLINE

Authors


Iverson GL. Brooks BL. Collins MW. Lovell MR.

Authors Full Name

Iverson, Grant L. Brooks, Brian L. Collins, Michael W. Lovell, Mark R.

Institution

University of British Columbia & Riverview Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada. giverson@interchange.ubc.ca

Title


Tracking neuropsychological recovery following concussion in sport.

Source


Brain Injury. 20(3):245-52, 2006 Mar.

Abstract


PRIMARY OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to illustrate the serial use of computerized neuropsychological screening with ImPACT to monitor recovery in a clinical case series of injured athletes. METHODS AND PROCEDURES: Amateur athletes with concussions (n= 30, average age= 16.1, SD= 2.1 years) underwent pre-season testing and three post-concussion evaluations within the following intervals: 1-2 days, 3-7 days (M= 5.2 days) and 1-3 weeks (M= 10.3 days). The study selection criteria increased the probability of including athletes with slow recovery. RESULTS: Repeated measures ANOVAs revealed significant main effects for all five composite scores (verbal memory, visual memory, reaction time, processing speed and total symptoms). In group analyses, performance decrements and symptoms relating to concussion appeared to largely resolve by 5 days post-injury and fully resolve by 10 days. Athletes' scores were examined individually using the reliable change methodology. At !

1 day post-injury, 90% had two or more reliable declines in performance or increases in symptom reporting. At 10 days, 37% were still showing two or more reliable changes from pre-season levels. CONCLUSIONS: This study illustrates the importance of analysing individual athletes' test data because group analyses can obscure slow recovery in a substantial minority of athletes.

Publication Type

Journal Article.


Result <6>

Unique Identifier

16421067

Status


MEDLINE

Authors


Hynes LM. Dickey JP.

Authors Full Name

Hynes, Loriann M. Dickey, James P.

Institution

Human Biology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada.

Title


Is there a relationship between whiplash-associated disorders and concussion in hockey? A preliminary study.

Source


Brain Injury. 20(2):179-88, 2006 Feb.

Abstract


PRIMARY OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship between the occurrence of whiplash-associated disorders and concussion symptoms in hockey players. RESEARCH DESIGN: Prospective cohort observational study to examine the relationship between whiplash associated disorders and concussion in actual hockey play. METHODS AND PROCEDURES: Twenty hockey teams were followed prospectively for one season. Team therapists completed acute and 7-10 day follow-up evaluation questionnaires for all of the players who received either a whiplash mechanism or a concussion. MAIN OUTCOMES AND RESULTS: 183 players were registered for this study; 13 received either a whiplash mechanistic injury or a concussion injury. Initial injuries ranged from WAD I to WAD III and all subjects reported concussion symptoms. Only three subjects reported full resolution of both WAD and concussion symptoms at the 7-10 day follow-up evaluation. CONCLUSIONS: There is a strong association between whiplash induced neck in!

juries and the symptoms of concussion in hockey injuries. Both should be evaluated when dealing with athletes/patients suffering from either injury.

Publication Type

Journal Article.


Result <7>

Unique Identifier

18216159

Status


MEDLINE

Authors


Yang J. Phillips G. Xiang H. Allareddy V. Heiden E. Peek-Asa C.

Authors Full Name

Yang, J. Phillips, G. Xiang, H. Allareddy, V. Heiden, E. Peek-Asa, C.

Institution

Department of Community and Behavioral Health, College of Public Health, The University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, E236 GH, Iowa City, Iowa 52242, USA. jingzhen-yang@uiowa.edu

Title


Hospitalisations for sport-related concussions in US children aged 5 to 18 years during 2000-2004.

Source


British Journal of Sports Medicine. 42(8):664-9, 2008 Aug.

Abstract


OBJECTIVES: To describe patient and hospital characteristics associated with hospitalisation for a diagnosis of non-fatal sport-related concussion, and to determine factors associated with these hospitalisations. METHODS: Children aged 5-18 years with a primary diagnosis of a sport-related concussion in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2000-2004) were identified. Length of stay and hospital charges for sport-related concussions were documented. Logistic regression was used to assess the association of patient or hospital characteristics with hospitalisations for sport-related concussion. RESULTS: Between 2000 and 2004, a total of 755 non-fatal paediatric sport-related hospitalisations for concussion were identified. Nationwide, this represents 3712 hospitalisations and over US$29 million total hospital charges, with nearly US$6 million in total hospital charges per year. Over half (52.3%) of patients with concussion experienced loss of consciousness. Over 80% of the patien!

ts hospitalised for concussion received no procedures during their average 1.1 day (median 0.8 day) of hospital stay. Older age, but not gender, was associated with increased odds of sport-related hospitalisations for concussion. Non-teaching hospitals or hospitals in rural areas had significantly greater odds of admitting sport-related concussions versus other sport-related traumatic brain injuries compared with teaching or urban hospitals. CONCLUSIONS: Management of paediatric sport-related concussions varied, depending on the patient and the hospital. Better guidelines are needed for the identification and management of sport-related concussions. Standardised procedures for hospitals treating concussive injuries may also be warranted.

Publication Type

Journal Article. Multicenter Study.


Result <8>

Unique Identifier

17615173

Status


MEDLINE

Authors


Delaney JS. Al-Kashmiri A. Drummond R. Correa JA.

Authors Full Name

Delaney, J S. Al-Kashmiri, A. Drummond, R. Correa, J A.

Institution

McGill Sport Medicine Clinic, 475 Pine Ave. West, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. j.delaney@mcgill.ca

Title


The effect of protective headgear on head injuries and concussions in adolescent football (soccer) players.

Source


British Journal of Sports Medicine. 42(2):110-5; discussion 115, 2008 Feb.

Abstract


OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of protective headgear in adolescent football (soccer) players. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Oakville Soccer Club, Oakville, Canada. PARTICIPANTS: Football players aged 12-17 years. INTERVENTION: A questionnaire examining the 2006 football season using self-reported symptoms. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The number of concussions experienced during the current football season, the duration of symptoms, injuries to the head and face and any associated risk factors for these injuries. RESULTS: In the population studied, 47.8% had experienced symptoms of a concussion during the current football year. 26.9% of athletes who wore headgear (HG) and 52.8% of those who did not wear headgear (No-HG) had concussions. Approximately 4 out of 5 athletes in each group did not realize they had suffered a concussion. More than one concussion was experienced by 50.0% of the concussed HG athletes and 69.3% of the concussed No-HG group. 23.9% of all conc!

ussed players experienced symptoms for at least 1 day or longer. Variables that increased the risk of suffering a concussion during the 2006 football year included being female and not wearing headgear. Being female and not wearing football headgear increased the risk of suffering an abrasion, laceration or contusion on areas of the head covered by football headgear. CONCLUSION: Adolescent football players experience a significant number of concussions. Being female may increase the risk of suffering a concussion and injuries on the head and face, while the use of football headgear may decrease the risk of sustaining these injuries.

Publication Type

Journal Article.


Result <9>

Unique Identifier

16431999

Status


MEDLINE

Authors


Williamson IJ. Goodman D.

Authors Full Name

Williamson, I J S. Goodman, D.

Institution

Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada.

Title


Converging evidence for the under-reporting of concussions in youth ice hockey.

Source


British Journal of Sports Medicine. 40(2):128-32; discussion 128-32, 2006 Feb.

Abstract


BACKGROUND: Concussions are potentially serious injuries. The few investigations of prevalence or incidence in youth ice hockey have typically relied on prospective reports from physicians or trainers and did not survey players, despite the knowledge that many athletes do not report probable concussions. OBJECTIVE: This study sought to compare concussion rates in youth ice hockey that were estimated from a variety of reporting strategies. METHODS: Rates were calculated from British Columbia Amateur Hockey Association (BCAHA) official injury reports, from direct game observation by minor hockey volunteers (such as coaches and managers), as well as from retrospective surveys of both elite and non-elite youth players. All research was conducted within the BCAHA. RESULTS: Estimates from official injury reports for male players were between 0.25 and 0.61 concussions per 1000 player game hours (PGH). Concussion estimates from volunteer reports were between 4.44 and 7.94 per 1000!

PGH. Player survey estimates were between 6.65 and 8.32 per 1000 PGH, and 9.72 and 24.30 per 1000 PGH for elite and non-elite male youth hockey, respectively. CONCLUSION: It was found that concussions are considerably under-reported to the BCAHA by youth hockey players and team personnel.

Publication Type

Journal Article. Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't.


Result <10>

Unique Identifier

16431999

Status


MEDLINE

Authors


Williamson IJ. Goodman D.

Authors Full Name

Williamson, I J S. Goodman, D.

Institution

Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada.

Title


Converging evidence for the under-reporting of concussions in youth ice hockey.

Source


British Journal of Sports Medicine. 40(2):128-32; discussion 128-32, 2006 Feb.

Other ID


Source: NLM. PMC2492052

Abstract


BACKGROUND: Concussions are potentially serious injuries. The few investigations of prevalence or incidence in youth ice hockey have typically relied on prospective reports from physicians or trainers and did not survey players, despite the knowledge that many athletes do not report probable concussions. OBJECTIVE: This study sought to compare concussion rates in youth ice hockey that were estimated from a variety of reporting strategies. METHODS: Rates were calculated from British Columbia Amateur Hockey Association (BCAHA) official injury reports, from direct game observation by minor hockey volunteers (such as coaches and managers), as well as from retrospective surveys of both elite and non-elite youth players. All research was conducted within the BCAHA. RESULTS: Estimates from official injury reports for male players were between 0.25 and 0.61 concussions per 1000 player game hours (PGH). Concussion estimates from volunteer reports were between 4.44 and 7.94 per 1000!

PGH. Player survey estimates were between 6.65 and 8.32 per 1000 PGH, and 9.72 and 24.30 per 1000 PGH for elite and non-elite male youth hockey, respectively. CONCLUSION: It was found that concussions are considerably under-reported to the BCAHA by youth hockey players and team personnel.

Publication Type

Journal Article. Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't.


Result <11>

Unique Identifier

19534331

Status


MEDLINE

Authors


Cusimano MD.

Authors Full Name

Cusimano, Michael D.

Institution

Injury Prevention Research Office, Division of Neurosurgery, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Title


Canadian minor hockey participants' knowledge about concussion.[see comment].

Comments


Comment in: Can J Neurol Sci. 2009 May;36(3):269-70; PMID: 19534322

Source


Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences. 36(3):315-20, 2009 May.

Abstract


BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In Canada and the USA, ice hockey is a cause of traumatic brain injury. Post-concussive symptoms are the most important feature of the diagnosis of concussion in sports and it is recommended that athletes not return to play while still symptomatic. Lack of knowledge of concussions could therefore be one of the main detriments to concussion prevention in hockey. The purpose of this research is to describe what minor league hockey players, coaches, parents and trainers know about concussion and its management. METHODS: A questionnaire to assess concussion knowledge and return to play guidelines was developed and administered to players at different competitive levels (n = 267), coaches, trainers and parents (total adults n = 142) from the Greater Toronto Area. RESULTS: Although a majority of adults and players could identify mechanisms responsible for concussion, about one-quarter of adults and about a quarter to a half of children could not recall!

any symptoms or recalled only one symptom of a concussion. A significant number of players and some adults did not know what a concussion was or how it occurred. Almost half of the players and a fifth of the adults incorrectly stated that concussion was treated with medication or physical therapy. Nearly one quarter of all players did not know if an athlete experiencing symptoms of concussion should continue playing. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that a significant number of people held misconceptions about concussion in hockey which could lead to serious health consequences and creates a need for better preventive and educational strategies.




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