Protected premises fire alarm system this section should be used for department of correctional services projects. This section covers a system which has one or more microprocessor based fire ala



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PART 3 EXECUTION
3.01 VERIFICATION OF CONDITIONS
A. Testing Existing Sub-Systems:

INDICATE WHICH SUB-SYSTEMS ARE TO BE TESTED.

1. Prior to installing the new system, test the existing sub-systems (________) to ascertain their operating condition:

a. Individually test initiating devices (except non-restorable types).

b. Test each initiating device circuit.

c. Test notification appliances.

d. Test each notification appliance circuit.

e. Test all control panel functions.

f. Do not discharge fire suppression systems.

2. Test shall be witnessed by the Company Field Advisor and the Director’s Representative.

3. Prepare a written report for the Director’s Representative indicating the repairs required, if any, to make the existing sub-systems function properly.

4. Repairs to the existing sub-systems are not included in the Work unless requested by Order on Contract.
3.02 INTERRUPTIONS TO EXISTING SUB-SYSTEMS
A. Maintain the existing sub-systems in their present condition to the extent possible while installing new Work.
USE PARAGRAPH BELOW FOR STANDARD PROCEDURE. USE SECOND PARAGRAPH BELOW WHEN SPECIFICALLY REQUESTED BY CLIENT AGENCY. SECOND PARAGRAPH BELOW MAY ALSO BE APPLICABLE FOR EXTENSIVE REHAB PROJECTS WHERE THE EXISTING F.A.S. MAY BE OUT OF SERVICE FOR EXTENDED PERIODS DUE TO REQUIREMENTS OF PROTECTING SMOKE DETECTING DEVICES FROM AIRBORNE DUST AND DEBRIS (REQUIRED BY SECTION 015000). REFER TO NFPA 101 9.6.1.8.

B. Prior to making changes or removals relative to the existing sub-systems, notify the Director’s Representative and have procedures approved.


C. When changes or removals are required to the existing fire alarm system such that it’s ability to act as a fire alarm system is impaired, provide a temporary fire alarm system so that the building is protected at all times by a functioning fire alarm system. Notify Building Supervisor (thru Director’s Representative) of proposed temporary measures and scheduling. Both the proposed temporary measures and the scheduling must be approved by the Director’s Representative.
D. Provide signs, instructions and alternate methods for reporting a fire.
3.03 INSTALLATION

SHOW A ONE LINE DIAGRAM OF COMPLETE SYSTEM INCLUDING INITIATING DEVICE CIRCUITS, NOTIFICATION APPLIANCE CIRCUITS, AND SIGNALING LINE CIRCUITS, BUT DO NOT SHOW NUMBER OR SIZE OF WIRES (SEE INFORMATION AT END OF SECTION 260532 INDICATING ALTERNATE METHODS FOR SHOWING THE RISERS ON THE DRAWINGS). DO NOT SHOW ANY 120 VAC WIRING (SUCH AS DOOR HOLD OPEN DEVICES) RUN IN THE SAME RACEWAY WITH 24 VDC CIRCUITS.

A. Install system in accordance with the Company’s printed instructions unless otherwise indicated.


B. Do not install smoke detecting devices until the Work (including cleaning) of all trades in the area has been completed. Protect installed smoke detecting devices from airborne dust and debris.
C. Mount smoke detecting devices, and seal air holes in the back of the devices (including interior of raceways and holes associated with installation of boxes and raceways) so that air flow from inside of housing or from the periphery of the housing will not prevent entry of smoke during a fire or test condition. Seal air holes with gaskets, expanding silicone foam, or other sealants as approved.
COORDINATE PARAGRAPH BELOW WITH ELEVATOR DESIGNERS.

D. Wiring for Elevator Recall for Fire Fighter’s Service and Other Elevator Emergency Functions:



SHOW WIRING FROM MFACP AND ICU’S TO TERMINAL STRIP CABINET IN ELEVATOR MACHINE ROOM FOR ALL ELEVATOR EMERGENCY OPERATIONS.

1. Provide wiring to and including a terminal strip cabinet in elevator machine rooms.

2. Contractor responsible for elevator installation will provide elevator control equipment for elevator operation and final electrical connections between terminal strip cabinet and the elevator controllers.
E. Wiring for Survivability:

1. Signals from manual fire alarm boxes and other fire alarm initiating devices within a building transmitted over the same signaling line circuit shall not interfere with the manual fire alarm box signals when both types of initiating devices are operated at the same time.

2. Failure of equipment or a fault on one or more installation wiring conductors of one notification appliance circuit shall not result in functional loss of any other notification appliance circuit.

3. Connect MFACP, ICU’s and other system components requiring a primary power supply to dedicated branch circuits.

a. Do not connect MFACP and ICU’s to a 2 pole device which can trip both poles at once, such as a 2 pole circuit breaker with handle tie (omit the tie).

4. Splices in wiring in vertical risers is prohibited.

5. Avoid splices in horizontal runs. When splices are necessary, use junction boxes. Exception: For 2-hour fire rated cable assembly, use UL listed methods to maintain 2-hour rating.

a. Make splices with mechanical or hydraulic type pressure connectors. The use of wire nuts is prohibited.

b. Paint cover of junction boxes fire department red.

FOR SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW REFER TO NFPA 72 3-8.4.1.1.4

6. Protect notification appliance circuits and other circuits necessary for the operation of the notification appliance circuits from the point at which they exit the fire alarm panel until the point that they enter the notification zone that they serve using one or more of the following methods:

a. A 2-hour rated cable assembly.

IF A 2-HOUR RATED SHAFT, ENCLOSURE OR STAIRWELL IS A VIABLE METHOD, IDENTIFY THE 2-HOUR RATED AREA ON THE DRAWINGS AND SHOW WIRING ROUTED THEREIN. IF 2-HOUR RATED AREAS ARE NOT AVAILABLE, OMIT 2 SUBPARAGRAPHS BELOW, AND IDENTIFY WIRING ON DRAWING AS 2-HOUR RATED CABLE ASSEMBLY.

b. A 2-hour rated shaft or enclosure.

c. A 2-hour rated stairwell in a building fully sprinklered.
SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS REQUIRED BY NFPA 72 3-4.2.2.2 FOR CLASS A CIRCUITS. EDIT FOR STYLES USED FOR PROJECT. OMIT ICU’S FOR SINGLE PANEL PROJECT. IF CLASS A, STYLE 6, 7, D, E, OR Z CIRCUITS ARE USED, SHOW THE RACEWAY SYSTEM LOOPED BACK TO THE MFACP OR ICU’S. DO NOT SHOW BOTH LEGS OF WIRING LOOP RETURNED TO MFACP OR ICU’S IN THE SAME RACEWAY NOR ALONG SAME ROUTE. SHOW SEPARATE RACEWAY OR 2-HOUR FIRE RATED CABLE ASSEMBLY.

7. Wiring Class A, Style 6, 7, D, E, or Z Signaling Line Circuits, Initiating Device Circuits and Notification Appliance Circuits: Do not install both legs of Class A, Style 6, 7, D, E, or Z circuits in same cable assembly, enclosure, or raceway back to MFACP or ICU’s.

a. Run return legs along another route to obtain maximum benefit of these alternate path circuits.
F. Identification, Labeling, Marking:
EXTENSIVE ADDITIONAL SIGNAGE FOR FLOOR EVACUATION PROCEDURES DURING A FIRE EMERGENCY AND INSTRUCTIONS FOR USE OF ELEVATORS AND EXITS IS REQUIRED BY NYSUFP&BC 735.1(n) AND 765.1(n) FOR BUILDINGS EQUIPPED WITH ELEVATORS. COORDINATE SIGNAGE WITH CONSTRUCTION CONTRACT, SECTION 101423. IF NO CONSTRUCTION CONTRACT, INCLUDE SECTION 101423 UNDER THIS CONTRACT.
OMIT REFERENCE TO REMOTE ANNUNCIATOR IN NEXT TWO SUBPARAGRAPHS IF NOT USED.

1. Procedure Sign: Install adjacent to MFACP and remote annunciator.



OMIT SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IF RA/CC IS NOT USED.

2. Alarm Notification Appliance Locator: Install adjacent to each RA/CC.

3. Nameplates:

a. Install on each manual fire alarm box a nameplate stating: Floor number, and location (1st Fl, east, etc.).



OMIT SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IF RA/CC IS NOT USED.

b. Install adjacent to each RA/CC annunciator module and switch module a nameplate indicating function of module.



SHOW ALL EQUIPMENT REQUIRING A PRIMARY POWER SUPPLY CONNECTED TO BRANCH CIRCUITS SUPPLIED BY A DIESEL-ALTERNATOR SYSTEM WHEN AVAILABLE.

c. Label the device used as the circuit disconnecting means for the dedicated branch circuits serving the system “FIRE ALARM CIRCUIT CONTROL” with white letters on a red background.

1) Install on each system component requiring a primary power supply a label stating the location of its circuit disconnecting means.

d. Install nameplate on each remote alarm indicator stating the location of its smoke detecting device and the area protected by the smoke detecting device and its function (IN DUCT SMOKE DETECTOR ALARM FOR ________).

4. Power-Limited Circuits: Mark circuits at terminations, indicating that circuit is a power-limited fire protective signaling circuit.

INDICATE NUMBER OF SIGNS IN SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW. TO SUIT JOB CONDITIONS. THE SIGNS ARE REQUIRED BY NYSUFP&BC 1060.2(b)(6).

5. Fire Alarm Signs: Where directed, install ________ single face signs mounted flat against the wall and ________ double faced signs mounted extended from the wall at conspicuous locations, drawing attention to the manual fire alarm boxes. Fasten signs to walls with vandal resistant fasteners.

6. Identification of Circuits: Identify wires and cables by system and function in interconnection cabinets, and FACP’s to which they connect with premarked, self-adhesive, wraparound type markers. Designations shall correspond with point to point wiring diagrams.

7. Battery Data: Insert a copy of the battery warranty in each battery compartment and mark on batteries the date placed in service.

8. Alarm Verification Warning Marking: Affix to the inside of each FACP, a list indicating:

a. Affected circuits.

b. Delay (seconds).

c. The smoke detector model numbers used.


G. Fire Suppression Systems Signal Attachments:

SHOW TAMPER SWITCHES AND CONNECTION TO ALL TAMPER SWITCHES. REFER TO SYSTEM DESCRIPTION FOR REQUIRED TAMPER SWITCH APPLICATIONS.

1. Install tamper switches.



COORDINATE SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW WITH PLUMBING. PLUMBING MAY INCLUDE THE INSTALLATION OF ATTACHMENTS IN THEIR CONTRACT. ALSO COORDINATE INSTALLATION OF ATTACHMENTS FOR EACH FIRE SUPPRESSION SYSTEM.

2. Install sprinkler system signal attachments.


H. Protective Devices: Install where indicated on the drawings.

1. Where devices are installed on wood or masonry surfaces, attach protective devices directly to the surface with vandal resistant fasteners.

2. Where protective devices are installed on steel surface, drill and tap holes and attach protective devices directly to the surface with vandal resistant fasteners.

3. Where devices are installed on suspended ceiling provide additional supports in the ceiling, such as channel support system, angle iron or additional runner bars. Fasten the additional supports rigidly to the ceiling runner bar system. Attach frame or brackets of protective device to the supports with vandal resistant fasteners. Install metal spacers between the protective device frame and the supports so that the ceiling tiles will not be a part of the support system.

4. Use finishing collar between surface and protective device where protective device cannot be mounted tight against surface due to job conditions.
3.04 FIELD QUALITY CONTROL
A. Preliminary System Test:

1. Preparation: Have the Company Field Advisor adjust the completed system and then operate it long enough to assure that it is performing properly.

2. Run a preliminary test for the purpose of:

a. Determining whether the system is in a suitable condition to conduct an acceptance test.

b. Checking and adjusting equipment.

c. Training facility personnel.


B. System Acceptance Test:

1. Preparation: Notify the Director’s Representative at least 3 working days prior to the test so arrangements can be made to have a Facility Representative witness the test.

2. Supply all equipment necessary for system adjustment and testing.

3. Make the following tests:

a. Test the system in accordance with NFPA 72, Chapter 7.

1) Follow test methods stated in Table 7-2.2.

2) Record results on NFPA 72 Figure 1-6.2.1 Record of Completion.

b. Test system operation step by step as summarized in SYSTEM DESCRIPTION.

4. Submit written report of test results signed by Company Field Advisor and the Director’s Representative. Also complete an NFPA Record of Completion.

a. Mount a copy of the written report of test results, and the NFPA 72 Record of Completion in plexiglass enclosed frame assemblies adjacent to each MFACP (one framed assembly for each report).


3.05 INSULATED CONDUCTOR SCHEDULE - TYPES AND USE
A. Signaling Line Circuits, Initiating Device Circuits and Notification Appliance Circuits:

1. Power-Limited Circuits: For interior wiring (in raceways) use power-limited fire alarm circuit multiconductor cable types specified in PART 2 except where a 2-hour fire rated cable assembly is required.

a. Number of conductors and conductor size as recommended by the Company producing the system, except that conductor size shall not be less than No. 18 AWG for signaling line circuits and not less than No. 16 AWG for initiating device circuits and notification appliance circuits.

b. Using Nonpower-Limited Wiring On Power-Limited Circuits: Wiring size and types specified for nonpower-limited circuits may be used for power-limited circuits if power-limited circuits are reclassified and the power-limited markings are eliminated. Refer to NFPA 70 Article 760-52(a) Exception No. 3.

2. Nonpower-Limited Circuits: For interior wiring (in raceways) use nonpower-limited fire alarm circuit single conductors or multiconductor cable types specified in PART 2 except where a 2-hour fire rated cable assembly is required.

a. Number of conductors and conductor size as recommended by the Company producing the system, except that conductor size shall not be less than No. 18 AWG for signaling line circuits, not less than No. 16 AWG for initiating device circuits, and not less than No. 14 AWG for notification appliance circuits.

3. Where wiring is specifically indicated on drawings not to be run in raceway, use metal-clad cable type MC (concealed, unless otherwise indicated), except where a 2-hour fire rated cable assembly is required.
B. Signaling Line Circuit Between MFACP and Networked ICU’s (Network Communication Bus):

1. Use 2-hour fire rated cable assembly.

a. Where MI or MC/CI cable is used and run in areas subjecting cable to corrosion, use PVC or HDPE jacketed cable (nonmetallic jacketed cable is not suitable for use in ducts, plenums or other spaces used for environmental air). Use nonmetallic jacketed cable in the following areas:

1) ____________________.


C. Other Circuits for Which 2-Hour Fire Rated Cable Assembly is Specified or Indicated:

1. Use CI cable in rigid steel conduit, MI cable, MC cable or FPL/EMT.

a. Where MI or MC/CI cable is used and run in areas subjecting cable to corrosion use PVC or HDPE jacketed cable (nonmetallic jacketed cable is not suitable for use in ducts, plenums or other spaces used for environmental air). Use nonmetallic jacketed cable in the following areas:

1) _______________.


D. Control Circuits Associated with the Fire Alarm System: Use Class 1, 2, and 3 wiring specified in Section 260221.
E. Primary Supply Circuits and Secondary Supply Wiring:

1. Use electric light and power wiring specified in Section 260221.


END OF SECTION
THE REMAINDER OF THIS SECTION IS FOR INFORMATION ONLY. NOT TO BE INCLUDED IN PROJECT SPECIFICATIONS.
1. Codes, Standards, and References applicable to the installation of Fire Alarm Systems:

a. National Fire Protection Association (Handbooks):

1) Fire Protection Handbook.

2) Fire Alarm Signaling Systems.

3) National Fire Alarm Code Handbook.

b. National Fire Protection Association – NFPA 72 National Fire Alarm Code, 1999 edition Chapter 9 and it’s referenced mandatory documents:

1) NFPA 10, Standard for Portable Fire Extinguishers, 1998 edition.

2) NFPA 13 Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems, 1999 edition.

3) NFPA 13D, Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems in One-and Two-Family Dwellings and Manufactured Homes, 1999 edition.

4) NFPA 13R, Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems in Residential Occupancies up to and Including Four Stories in Height, 1999 edition.

5) NFPA 20, Standard for the Installation of Stationary Pumps for Fire Protection, 1999 edition.

6) NFPA 25, Standard for the Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance of Water-Based Fire Protection Systems, 1998 edition.

7) NFPA 37, Standard for the Installation and Use of Stationary Combustion Engines and Gas Turbines, 1998 edition.

8) NFPA 54, National Fuel Gas Code, 1999 edition.

9) NFPA 58, Liquefied Petroleum Gas Code, 1998 edition.

10) NFPA 70, National Electrical Code, 1999 edition.

11) NFPA 75, Standard for the Protection of Electronic Computer/Data Processing Equipment, 1999 edition.

12) NFPA 90A, Standard for the Installation of Air-Conditioning and Ventilating Systems, 1999 edition.

13) NFPA 101, Life Safety Code, 1997 edition. (Master Specification updated to 2000 Edition).

14) NFPA 110, Standard for Emergency and Standby Power Systems, 1999 edition.

15) NFPA 111, Standard on Stored Electrical Energy Emergency and Standby Power Systems, 1996 edition.

16) NFPA 601, Standard for Security Services in Fire Loss Prevention, 1996 edition.

17) NFPA 780, Standard for the Installation of Lighting Protection Systems, 1997 edition.

18) NFPA 1221, Standard for the Installation, Maintenance, and Use of Emergency Services Communications Systems, 1999 edition.

19) ANSI A-58.1, Building Code Requirements for Minimum Design Loads in Buildings and Other Structures,

20) ANSI S1.4a, Specifications for Sound Level Meters, 1985.

21) ANSI S3.41, Audible Emergency Evacuation Signal, 1996.

22) ANSI/ASME A17.1, Safety Code for Elevators and Escalators,1998.

23) ANSI/IEEE C2, National Electrical Safety Code, 1997.

24) ANSI/UL 217, Standard for Safety Single and Multiple Station Smoke Alarms, 1997.

25) ANSI/UL 268, Standard for Safety Smoke Detectors for Fire Protective Signaling Systems, 1999.

26) ANSI/UL 827, Standard for Safety Central-Station for Watchman, Fire-Alarm and Supervisory Services, 1997.

27) ANSI/UL 985, Standard for Safety Household Fire Warning Control Units, 1994.

28) ANSI/UL 1971, Signaling Devices for Hearing Impaired, 1995.

29) EIA Tr 41.3, Telephones (Electronic Industries Alliance, 2500 Wilson Boulevard, Arlington, VA 22201-3834.)

30) International Municipal Signal Association, P.O. Box 539, Newark, NY 14513 (Wire and Cable Specifications).

31) National Institute for Certification in Engineering Technologies, 1420 King Street, Alexandria, VA 22314-2794. (NICET Certification in the Field of Fire Protection and Engineering Technology)

c. National Fire Protection Association – NFPA 72 National Fire Alarm Code, 1999 edition, Appendix C and it’s referenced informational documents:

1) NFPA 11, Standard for Low-Expansion Foam, 1998 edition.

2) NFPA 11A, Standard for Medium- and High-Expansion Foam Systems, 1999 edition.

3) NFPA 12, Standard on Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, 1998 edition.

4) NFPA 12A, Standard on Halon 1301 Fire Extinguishing Systems, 1997 edition..

5) NFPA 14, Standard for the Installation of Standpipe and Hose Systems, 1996 edition.

6) NFPA 15, Standard for Water Spray fixed Systems for Fire Protection, 1996 edition.

7) NFPA 17, Standard for Dry Chemical Extinguishing Systems, 1998 edition.

8) NFPA 80, Standard for Fire Doors and Fire Windows,1999 edition.

9) NFPA 90B, Standard for the Installation of Warm Air Heating and Air Conditioning Systems, 1999 edition.

10) NFPA 92A, Recommended Practice for Smoke-Control Systems, 1996 edition..

11) NFPA 92B, Guide for Smoke Management Systems in Malls, Atria, and Large Areas, 1995 edition..

12) NFPA 170, Standard for Fire Safety Symbols, 1999 edition.

13) ANSI S3.2, Method for Measuring the Intelligibility of Speech Over Communications Systems, 1989.

14) IEC 60849, Sound Systems for Emergency Purposes, Second Edition: 1998.

15) IEC 60268, Part 16, The Objective Rating of Speech Intelligibility by Speech Transmission Index, Second Edition: 1998.

d. NYS Uniform Fire Prevention and Building Codes:

1) 735.1(n) Floor Evacuation Procedure Signs (Multiple Dwellings).

2) 739.4(d)(8) Shafts (Multiple Dwellings).

3) 724 Fire Protection Equipment (Multiple Dwellings).

4) 765.1(n) Floor Evacuation Procedure Signs (General Building Construction).

5) 771.4(h)(10) Shafts (General Building Construction).

6) 774 Fire Protection Equipment (General Building Construction).

7) 791 Fire and Smoke Detecting System (Public Assembly).

8) 850 General Provisions for Systems and Equipment.

9) 1060 Fire Protection Equipment.

10) 1061 Coordinated Fire Safety System.

11) 1062.7(b) Emergency Operation (Elevators).

12) 1101.4(j) Emergency Warning Systems (Facilities for the Physically Handicapped).

13) 1101.5( c)(6) Communication Area of Refuge (Facilities for the Physically Handicapped

14) 1101.5( c)(8)(ii) Pressurized Elevator Lobby/Shaft (Facilities for the Physically Handicapped).

15) 1163.13( c)(4) sign “Call Fire Department by Telephone.”

16) 1250.1 Applicability (Reference Standards).

17) 1250.3 Reference standards applicable to State Uniform Fire Prevention and Building Code.

e. Underwriters Laboratories Inc.:

1) Fire Protection Equipment Catalogue (Listings and Classifications).

2) UL 13 Power-Limited Circuit Cables.

3) UL 38 Manually Actuated Signaling Boxes for Use with Fire-Protective Signaling Systems.

4) UL 44 Rubber-Insulated Wires and Cables.

5) UL 83 Thermoplastic-Insulated Wires and Cables.

6) UL 193 Alarm Valves for Fire-Protection Service.

7) UL 217 Single and Multiple Station Smoke Alarms.

8) UL 228 Door Closers-Holders, With or Without Integral Smoke Detecting devices.

9) UL 268 Smoke Detectors for Fire Protective Signaling Systems.

10) UL 268A Smoke Detecting devices for Duct Application.

11) UL 346 Waterflow Indicators for Fire Protective Signaling Systems.

12) UL 393 Indicating Pressure Gauges for Fire-Protection Service.

13) UL 444 Communications Cables.

14) UL 464 Audible Signal Appliances.

15) UL 497A Secondary Protectors for Communications Circuits.

16) UL 497B Protectors for Data Communications and Fire Alarm Circuits.

17) UL 521 Heat Detecting devices for Fire Protective Signaling Systems.

18) UL 539 Single and Multiple Station Heat Detecting devices.

19) UL 753 Alarm Accessories for Automatic Water-Supply Control Valves for Fire Protection Service.

20) UL 864 Control Units for Fire Protective Signaling Systems.

21) UL 910 Test For Cable Flame - Propogation and Smoke Density Values for Electrical and Optical-Fiber Cables Used in Spaces Transporting Environmental Air.

22) UL 1076 Proprietary Burglar Alarm Units and Systems.

23) UL 1424 Cables for Power-Limited Fire-Alarm Circuits.

24) UL 1425 Cables for Non-Power-Limited Fire-Alarm Circuits.

25) UL 1480 Speakers for Fire Protective Signaling Systems.

26) UL 1481 Power Supplies for Fire Protective Signaling Systems.

27) UL 1638 Visual Signaling Appliances - Private Mode Emergency and General Utility Signaling.

28) UL 1711 Amplifiers for Fire Protective Signaling Systems.

29) UL 1971 Signaling Devices for Hearing Impaired.

30) UL 2196 - Tests of Fire Resistive Cables.

f. American National Standards Institute:

1) ASME/ANSI A17.1 Safety Code for Elevators and Escalators.

2) ASME/ANSI A17.3 Safety Code for Existing Elevators and Escalators.

3) ANSI A117.1 - Accessible and Usable Buildings and Facilities.

4) ANSI S-1.4a Specifications for Sound Level Meters.

5) ANSI S3.41 Audible Emergency Evacuation Signal.

g. National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA):

1) Guide for Proper Use of Smoke Detectors in Duct Application

2) Guide for Proper Use of System Smoke Detectors.

3) Quality Automatic Fire Detection and Alarm System Installation.

4) Training Manual on Fire Alarm Systems.

2. Indicate on drawings where specific initiating devices are to be used. In general:

a. Use combination rate-of-rise/fixed temperature heat detectors or heat sensors (135 degrees F) as the basic heat detecting device except where temperature could rise more than 15 degrees F per minute (use fixed temperature heat detector).

1) Use combination R.O.R./F.T. (190/200 degrees F) for higher ambient temperature locations: boiler rooms, etc. Heat sensors are not available above 135 degrees F.

b. Use fixed temperature heat detecting devices (135 degrees or 190/200 degrees F to suit ambient conditions) where temperature could rise more than 15 degrees F per minute: near heating supply registers, in generator rooms, near large exterior doors, etc.

c. Use rate compensation/fixed temperature heat detectors devices or heat sensors where a faster acting heat detecting device may be required (computer rooms, etc.):

1) Rate compensation/fixed temperature heat detectors have a tube 3 inches long which extends down from the ceiling, making them more prone to damage and less aesthetically pleasing.

d. Use ionization type smoke detectors or smoke sensors as spot type detecting devices in areas where the following statement would be applicable: “Ionization detection is more responsive to invisible (less than one micron in size) particles produced by most flaming fires. It is somewhat less responsive to the larger particles typical of most smoldering fires”. Do not use ionization type for the following applications:

1) In dirty laundry storage areas (urine fumes activate ionization type smoke detecting device.

2) In areas subject to high velocity air movements (especially not in front of heating and air conditioning supply registers).

3) In areas where people can gather to smoke.

4) In kitchens, shops, garages and other areas where smoke or fumes are given off during normal activities.

5) In areas where ether or other volatile chemicals are used.

e. Use photoelectric type smoke detectors or smoke sensors as spot type detecting devices in areas where the following statement would be applicable: “Photoelectric light scattering detection is more responsive to visible (more than one micron in size) particles produced by most smoldering fires. It is somewhat less responsive to the smaller particles typical of most flaming fires. It is also less responsive to black smoke than to lighter colored smoke”.

1) Also use photoelectric type smoke detecting devices where normal activities might cause ionization type to alarm (listed in d. above).

2) Since photoelectric smoke detecting devices sense particles of combustion differently than ionization type, a more effective coverage could be achieved by using both types in critical locations: Sleeping area, corridors, etc.
END OF INFORMATION

Updated 07/08/09

Printed 07/08/2018 283101 - Project No.


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