Memorandum to: Scott Dimetrosky, eeb evaluation Consultant From



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Electric Summer Peak Demand Interactive Effects


The electric summer peak demand IE factor13 is calculated in the same manner as the electric energy IE factor, except it uses summer peak demand savings instead of consumption savings:

As Table demonstrates, electric summer peak demand IE factors do not vary substantially by cooling configuration. On average, a lighting retrofit will result in 105% of the summer peak demand savings attributable to lighting alone due to interactive effects.

Table : Average Electric Summer Peak Demand IE Factors by Cooling Configurationa


Cooling configuration

Number of Homes

Electric Demand IE Factor

Overall

180

1.05

Central air conditioner

77

1.06

Room air conditioner(s)

68

1.06

Heat pump

13

1.06

No cooling

22

1.00

a Proportionally weighted to reflect statewide saturation percentage

of ducted central air conditioning systems—see Section .


Heating Fuel Interactive Effects


The heating fuel IE factor is a ratio of the whole-building heating fuel increase to the electric energy savings resulting from a lighting retrofit. It is calculated in the following manner:

Table expresses the heating fuel IE factor in BTU/kWh—the annual increase in heating fuel use in BTU per annual kWh of lighting savings. This factor accounts for interactive effects on heating requirements only for homes that are not heated with electricity; the electric IE factors in Sections and account for heating interactive effects in electric-heated homes.

Replacing incandescent bulbs with more efficient bulbs results in 1,902 BTU in increased heating consumption on average per kWh of electricity saved at the lighting end use. The heating IE factor for gas-heated homes is larger because these homes tend to be less efficient—based on Home Energy Rating System (HERS) scores—than other homes.14

Table : Heating Fuel IE Factors – BTU/kWh



Heating fuel

Number of Homes

Heating IE Factor in BTU/kWha

Oil, LP, or biomass

118

1,887

Natural gas

48

1,941

Overall

166

1,902

a Weighted with heating fuel proportional weight—see Section .

Table presents the same information as Table , converted from BTU to units of heating fuel. On average, homes heated with fossil fuels will use an extra 0.01 to 0.02 units of fuel per kWh of lighting savings.

Table : Heating Fuel IE Factors – Units of Fuel/kWha


Heating fuel

Number of Homes

Heating IE Factor in Fuel Units/kWh

Oil (gallons)

112

0.014

Natural gas (ccf)

46

0.019

LP (gallons)

3

0.019

Biomass (MMBtu)

3

0.002

Overall (MMBtu)

166

0.002

a Weighted with heating fuel proportional weight—see

Section .


Heating Fuel Impact Per Bulb


Table describes the impact on heating fuel use per upgraded bulb. On average, each upgraded bulb will result in about 0.07 MMBtu/year in additional heating requirements. This represents 0.06% of the average home’s annual heating fuel use measured in MMBtu. Assuming an HES retrofit of 25 bulbs—the maximum currently allowed in that program—the impact on heating fuel use would represent 1.5% of the average home’s existing annual heating fuel use.

Table : HVAC Heating Fuel Impacts Per Upgraded Bulb



Heating fuel type

Number of Homes

Annual MMBtu Increase per Bulba

Overall

166

0.07

Oil, LP, or biomass

118

0.07

Natural gas

48

0.07

Average annual MMBtu consumption per home for non-electric heating

166

123.1

Per-bulb IE heating fuel impact as a percentage of annual heating consumption

166

0.06%

25-bulb IE heating fuel impact as a percentage of annual heating consumption

166

1.5%

a Weighted with heating fuel proportional weight—see Section .
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