Members of the Jewish police were not the only ones who served the Germans; some Jews acted



Download 2.34 Mb.
Page52/62
Date conversion04.02.2017
Size2.34 Mb.
1   ...   48   49   50   51   52   53   54   55   ...   62

862 Bella Gutterman, A Narrow Bridge to Life: Jewish Slave Labor and Survival in the Gross-Rosen Camp System, 1940–1945 (New York: Berghahn Books, 2008), 60–61, 138.


863 Lewin, Witnesses to the Holocaust, 30. Henry Freier, who was liberated as a prisoner of Regensburg, recalled: “We took some revenge. One of the biggest killers from the S.S. guard, we were tearing pieces from him and buried him right there in Regensburg. Later, in Laufen, I was president of the Jewish committee, taking food from the Germans and giving to the Jews.” Ibid., 31.

864 Memoir of Peter (Dzeider) Kleinmann, Internet: , chapter 5.

865 Testimony of Harry Jubas, September 4, 2008, Holocaust Memorial Center, Farmington Hills, Michigan, Internet: .

866 Roma Ligocka, Tylko ja sama (Kraków: Wydawnictwo Literackie, 2004), 324.

867 Gabriel N. Finder and Alexander V. Prusin, “Jewish Collaborators on Trial in Poland, 1944–1956,” in Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry, vol. 20 (2008): 142–44.

868 Mendel Dombrowicz, “MY Survival under the Nazi Regime,” in Sefer Kehilat Yehudei Dabrowa Gornicza (Tel Aviv: Organization of Dabrowa Gornicza Emigres in Israel, 1971), 340, translated as Book of the Jewish Community of Dabrowa Gornicza and Its Destruction, Internet: .

869 Icek Kuperberg, Memoirs of a Holocaust Survivor (Parkland, Florida: Universal Publisher, 2000), 35, 61.

870 Wiszniewicz, And Yet I Still Have Dreams, 81.

871 Ibid., 245. Idel Bekerman reported that the Judenrat in Kielce managed to send Jewish blackmailers and denouncers to Auschwitz. See her account in Grynberg and Kotowska, Życie i zagłada Żydów polskich 1939–1945, 191.

872 Morris Wyszogrod, A Brush with Death: An Artist in the Death Camps (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1999), 127–29.

873 Daniel Freiberg, “Budzyń,” in David Shtokfish, ed., Sefer Krasnik (Tel Aviv: Krasnik Socities in Israel and the Diaspora, 1973), 242; translated as Book of Krasnik, Internet: . Freiberg writes that the Jews in the camp from nearby towns were better off than other prisoners since they were helped by the Poles with whom they had left their property for safekeeping and most of the met Polish acquaintances in their workplaces who would helped them out. Ibid., 241.

874 Ibid., 249.

875 T. Brustin-Bernsztein, “Jews in Krasnik During the Years of the Hitlerist Occupation,” in ibid., 310–11.

876 Wiszniewicz, And Yet I Still Have Dreams, 85.

877 Christopher R. Browning, Collected Memories: Holocaust History and Postwar Testimony (Madison: The University of Wisconsin Press, 2003), 56–57; Browning, Remembering Survival, 117–20.

878 Frister, The Cap, or the Price of a Life, 260–61.

879 Browning, Collected Memories, 78–81; Browning, Remembering Survival, 228–33.

880 Adam Neuman-Nowicki, Struggle for Life During the Nazi Occupation of Poland (Lewiston, New York; Queenston, Ontario; Lampeter, Ceredigion, Wales: The Edwin Mellen Press, 1998), 48–49.

881 Neuman-Nowicki, Struggle for Life During the Nazi Occupation of Poland, 50.

882 Kagan, ed., Szydlowiec Memorial Book, 279.

883 Alvin Abram, The Light After Dark II: Six More Stories of Triumph After All Hope Had Gone… (Toronto: AMA Graphics Incorporated, 2000), 100.

884 Testimony of Louis Kaye, May 9, 1983, Voice/Vision Holocaust Survivor Oral History Archive, University of Michigan at Dearborn, Internet: .

885 Thon, I Wish It Were Fiction, 103–9.

886 Gebriel N. Finder and Alexander V. Prusin, “Jewish Collaborators on Trial in Poland, 1944–1956,” in Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry, vol. 20 (2008): 141–42.

887 Mittelberg, Between Two Worlds, 60–68.

888 Testimony of Morris Kirsch, November 6, 1994, Holocaust Memorial Center, Farmington Hills, Michigan, Internet: .

889 Haft, Harry Haft, 52–53.

890 Aryeh Shamri and Dov First, eds., Pinkas Novi-Devor (Pinkas Novy-Dvor) (Tel Aviv: The Organizations of Former Novy-Dvor Jews in Israel, the United States, Canada, Argentina, Uruguay and France, 1965), xvii. This source points out that it was the town’s ethnic Germans who were the directors of the German extermination program: “Two underworld gangsters of the Novy-Dvor Folksdeutschen [Volksdeuteschen], the brothers Wendt, assumed leading positions in town in order to annihilate the Jewish population.”

891 Itzhok Leib Rosen, “The Struggle with the Jewish ‘Kapos’,” in Itzhok Berglass and Shlomo Yahalomi-Diamond, eds., Sefer Strizhuv ve-ha-seviva (Tel Aviv: Former Residents of Strzyzow in Israel and Diaspora, 1969), 381–83; translated as The Book of Strzyzow and Vicinity, Internet:
1   ...   48   49   50   51   52   53   54   55   ...   62


The database is protected by copyright ©dentisty.org 2016
send message

    Main page