Lincoln trails council boy scouts of america



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LINCOLN TRAILS COUNCIL

BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA




HOW TO CONDUCT A CUB SCOUT BOY TALK

(Conducted by a Pack Leader or District Volunteer)

What is a Boy Talk?
The Boy Talk is a 3 - 5 minute presentation to 1st – 5th grade boys, in school, in order to get them excited about Cub Scouting and how to join. It is held during the school day.

Boy Talk Essentials:
Talks are best conducted from one classroom to another. In other words, it is better for YOU to move from classroom to classroom than to have a mass of boys assemble in the lunchroom. If you must have an assembly, be sure a teacher or the principal stays with you.
Take along a:


  • Supply of fliers

  • Pinewood Derby car

  • Cub Scout uniform (full of badges)

Conduct the Boy Talk two or three days prior to the Roundup.



Steps in Conducting the Boy Talk:


  1. Call the school principal at least ten days prior to the day you want to conduct the Boy Talk. Ask him/her to allow you to go from classroom to classroom (or have an assembly).

  2. Wear your uniform.

  3. Stop at the school office to introduce yourself to the secretary and principal about 15 minutes prior to the time you have scheduled.

  4. Introduce yourself to each classroom teacher and say that you are there to talk to the boys about Scouts, but the girls are welcome to listen. (They may wish to join Girl Scouts.)

  5. The actual presentation to the boys should include:

  1. A brief description about the fun activities in Cub Scouts.

  2. The importance of coming to the Roundup, with parents.

  3. Use a gimmick to get the fliers home, such as having the boys put them in their sock or book bag.

  4. Finish with a reminder of the where and when of the Roundup. Ask the boys to repeat it.

  5. Leave extra fliers with each classroom teacher.

  6. Stop at the office on the way out and leave extra fliers with the school secretary.

IN-SCHOOL CUB SCOUT PROMOTION SCRIPT

Note: Kids’ minds run “100 miles per minute,” and “long pauses” give them time to stray mentally and physically. So…rehearse this script (customize to your own comfort), be enthusiastic, talk loudly and talk fast!
Hi, guys! My name is _________, and I’m here to invite you to join Cub Scouting (or Tiger Cubs, etc.) We only have a few minutes, so I am going to talk fast. Listen closely.
How many of you would like to get a block of wood and four wheels, design a race care with your parents, carve it, paint it, and race against all your buddies? (Show a Pinewood Derby car, if you have one, and raise your hand. They should raise theirs.)
Okay, hands down. How many would like to be with a small group of your friends that meets once a week called a den? In den meetings, you make things, play games, have treats and get ready for family night. (Raise your hand.) At family night, called a pack meeting, the parents come to see what you’ve learned, watch your skits and see you get the badges you’ve earned.
Next summer, you can go to Cub Scout day camp, make things, play games, shoot a bow and arrows. Who would like to do that? (Raise your hand.)
How many of you think Cub Scouting sounds fun? (Raise your hand.)
Well, next ________ (day), you can join Cub Scouting. Bring your parents to the meeting on:

Date __________________ Time __________ Place __________________


Okay, guys, what day is it? (Get them to say it.) What time is it? What place is it? Who are you going to bring with you? (Parent.)
So, who’s going to try to come to the meeting? (Raise your hand.)
Great! (If you have fliers, pass them out.)
Thank you for being good listeners. I hope you’ll join all the fun and adventure of Cub Scouting. (Turn back control to teacher. Thank teacher and depart. Stop in and thank school secretary and principal.)

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