June 2009 Human-Factors Taxonomy preface



Download 0.59 Mb.
Page2/4
Date conversion28.11.2016
Size0.59 Mb.
1   2   3   4

Project Objectives


The objectives of this taxonomy are to: (1) identify an extensive list of human factors, (2) promote commonality in nomenclature and units of measurement, and (3) enable the development and use of a common human-factors taxonomy for data collection and data processing.

Human-Factors Taxonomy



  1. Environment

    1. Natural Environment

      1. Location

        1. Longitude [degrees]

        2. Latitude [degrees]

        3. Altitude/Depth [meters mean sea level]

      2. Space Environment

      3. Meteorological Environment

        1. Air Temperature

          1. Temperature Range [degrees Celsius]

          2. Temperature Variability [degrees Celsius]

          3. Temperature Duration [seconds]

        2. Pressure

          1. Atmospheric Pressure [kilopascals]

          2. Oxygen Partial Pressure [kilopascals]

          3. Vapor Pressure of Air-Saturated Water [kilopascals]

        3. Wind

          1. Wind Direction [degrees]

          2. Wind Speed [kilometers per hour]

        4. Relative Humidity [percent]

        5. Clouds

          1. Type (cirrus, cumulus, etc.)

          2. Base [meters]

          3. Ceiling [meters]

          4. Coverage [percent]

        6. Precipitation

          1. Type (visible moisture)

            1. Hail [centimeters]

            2. Rain [centimeters]

            3. Sleet [centimeters]

            4. Snow [centimeters]

            5. Ice [centimeters]

          2. Rate [centimeters per hour]

          3. Duration [hours]

          4. Depth [centimeters of water]

        7. Electrical Disturbances

          1. Lightning

            1. Rate [strikes per hour]

            2. Duration [hours]

          2. Solar Storms

            1. Rate [flares per hour]

            2. Duration [hours]

        8. Visibility

          1. Obscurants

            1. Smoke [parts per million]

            2. Dust [parts per million]

            3. Fog [parts per million]

            4. Haze or Smog [parts per million]

          2. Horizontal Visibility [kilometers]

          3. Ambient Illumination

            1. Twilight Beginning/Ending [time of day]

            2. Moon Phase/Rise/Set [time of day]

            3. Star Brilliance [lux]

            4. Sun Intensity/Rise/Set [lux and time of day]

          4. Sun/Moon Angle [degrees azimuth and elevation]

      4. Terrestrial Environment

        1. Topography

          1. Minor Relief Features

            1. High Ground (mesas, buttes, ridges, dunes)

            2. Depressions (basins, canyons, wadis)

            3. Breaks in High Ground (passes, gaps)

            4. Special Features of Terrain (talus slopes, boulder fields)

          2. Microrelief Features of Terrain (low escarpments, stream banks, pits, dikes, swales, kames, moraines)

          3. Elevation/Slope of Terrain

            1. Shape of Terrain (convex, concave, uniform)

            2. Angle of Terrain (percent, degrees, gradient)

        2. Surface Composition

          1. Soil

            1. Composition (clay, gravel, loam, sand, silt)

            2. Bedrock Depth [meters]

            3. Moisture in Soil

            4. Layering of Soil

            5. Consistency [loose, solid]

          2. Rock

            1. Formation Class (igneous, sedimentary, metamorphic)

            2. Thickness of Rock [meters]

            3. Consistency [loose, solid]

        3. Drainage of Terrain

          1. Watersheds, Water Courses, and Water Bodies (stream, river, creek, canal, lake)

            1. Flow Velocity, Tidal Effects, Flooding Potential

            2. Water Crossings

            3. Banks/Shore (composition, height, condition)

            4. Terrain Adjacent to Water

            5. Dimensions of Water Body (width, depth) [meters]

          2. Wet Areas (swamp, marsh, bog, paddy)

            1. Inundation Causes

            2. Crossings of Wet Areas

            3. Flooding Potential of Wet Areas

        4. Flora (naturally occurring)

          1. Trees

            1. Canopy Height [meters]

            2. Coverage [percent]

            3. Density

            4. Trunk Diameter [centimeters]

          2. Shrubs (hedgerows)

          3. Grasses and Crops

          4. Micro-organisms

            1. Biological Agents

              1. Bacterial Agents

                1. Bacillus anthracis

                2. Brucella

                  1. Brucella abortus

                  2. Brucella canis

                  3. Brucella melitensis

                  4. Brucella neotomae

                  5. Brucella ovis

                  6. Brucella subspecies

                  7. Brucella suls

                3. Bacillus cereus

                4. Bacillus stearothermophillus

                5. Francisella tularensis

                6. Malleomyces mallei

                7. Malleomyces pseudomallei

                8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis

                9. Pasteurella pestis

                10. Pasteurella tularensis

                11. Salmonella (nonspecific)

                12. Salmonella typhimurium

                13. Serratia marcescens

                14. Spores (nonspecific, produced by bacteria)

                15. Vibrio cholerae

                16. Yersinia pestis

              2. Fungi

                1. Coccidioides immitis

                2. Herbicidal Fungi

                  1. Phytophtora infestans

                  2. Sclerotium rolfsi

                3. Histoplasma capsulatum

              3. Rickettsia

                1. Coxiella burneti

                2. Rickettsia australis

                3. Rickettsia conori

                4. Rickettsia typhi (mooseri)

                5. Rickettsia prowazeki

                6. Rickettsia rickettsi

                7. Rickettsia sibirica

                8. Rickettsia tsutsugamushi

              4. Toxins

                1. Aflatoxin G2

                2. Batrachotoxin

                3. Black Widow Spider Venom

                4. Clostridium botulinum Toxins

                  1. Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxin A

                  2. Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxin B

                  3. Clostridium botolinum Neurotoxin C1

                  4. Clostridium botolinum Neurotoxin C2

                  5. Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxin D

                  6. Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxin E

                  7. Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxin F

                  8. Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxin G

                5. Cobra Venom

                6. Endotoxins

                7. Fusarium trichothecenes

                8. Hornet Venom

                9. Microcystin

                10. Picrotoxin

                11. Rattlesnake Venom

                12. Ricin

                13. Saxitoxin

                14. Scorpion Venom

                15. Snake (nonspecific) Venom

                16. Staphylococcal Enterotoxins

                  1. Staphylococcal Enterotoxin A

                  2. Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B

                17. Tetrodotoxin

                18. Trichothecenes

                19. Vibrio Cholerae Enterotoxin

                20. Wasp Venom

                21. Yellow Rain

              5. Viruses

                1. Chlamydia psittaci Virus

                2. Dengue Fever Virus

                3. Encephalitis Viruses

                  1. Encephalitis Lethargica Virus

                  2. Japanese Encephalitis Virus

                  3. Russian Spring-Summer Encephalitis Virus

                  4. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus

                  5. Western Encephalitis Virus

                4. Encephalomyelitis Viruses

                  1. Venezuelan Equine Encephalomyelitis Virus

                5. Hemorrhagic Fever Virus

                  1. Ebola Fever Virus

                  2. Lassa Fever Virus

                  3. Marburg Fever Virus

                6. Influenza Virus

                7. Meningitis Virus

                8. Newcastle Disease (Avian Pneumoencephalitis) Virus

                9. Onyong-Nyong Virus

                10. Psittacosis Virus

                11. Rift Valley Fever Virus

                12. Smallpox Virus

                13. Vesicular Stomatitis Virus

                14. Yellow Fever Virus

              6. Yeasts

          5. Hostile Flora

            1. Poisonous Flora

              1. Poison Ivy

              2. Poison Oak

              3. Poison Sumac

            2. Thorns

        5. Fauna (naturally occurring)

          1. Hostile Fauna

            1. Insects

              1. Ticks

              2. Fleas

              3. Mosquitoes

              4. Mites

              5. Arachnids

              6. Parasites

            2. Carnivores

          2. Harmless Fauna

      5. Oceanographic Environment

        1. Temperature

          1. Temperature Range [degrees Celsius]

          2. Temperature Variability [degrees Celsius]

        2. Pressure [kilopascals]

        3. Current

          1. Velocity [meters per second]

          2. Direction [degrees]

        4. Thermocline Depth [meters]

        5. Topography

        6. Acoustic Disturbances

          1. Wave Action

          2. Whales

    2. Artificial Environment

      1. Nuclear Environment (initial, residual)

        1. Blast Overpressure

          1. Dynamic Pressure [kilopascals]

          2. Static Pressure [kilopascals]

        2. Radiation Exposure

          1. Ionizing-Radiation Exposure [sieverts for dose equivalent]

            1. Gamma Radiation [grays for absorbed dose]

            2. Neutron Radiation

            3. Beta Radiation

            4. X-Radiation [grays per minute for absorbed dose]

          2. Nonionizing-Radiation Exposure

            1. Infrared Radiation [joules per square meter]

            2. Visible Radiation [joules per square meter]

            3. Ultraviolet Radiation [joules per square meter]

            4. Radio-Frequency (RF) Radiation [microwatts per square centimeter]

          3. Radiation Shielding

            1. Gun Shielding

            2. Frequency Domain Coding Shielding

            3. Tank Shielding

            4. Vehicle Shielding

        3. Isotopes in Fallout (long-half life)

        4. Residual Radiation

          1. Contaminated Metal

          2. Contaminated Soil

        5. Nuclear-Induced Weather Patterns

      2. Chemical Agents

        1. Alogens

          1. 5-Hydroxtrytamine [parts per million]

          2. Acetylcholine [parts per million]

          3. Histamine [parts per million]

        2. Binary Agents

          1. EA5774 [parts per million]

          2. EA5823 [parts per million]

          3. EA5824 [parts per million]

          4. EA5825 [parts per million]

          5. EA5826 [parts per million]

        3. Blister Agents

          1. Blister Agent Arsenicals

            1. Ethyldichloroarsine [parts per million]

            2. Methyldicloroarsine [parts per million]

            3. Phenyldichloroarsine [parts per million]

          2. H Agents

            1. H [parts per million]

            2. HD [parts per million]

            3. HL [parts per million]

            4. HN-1 [parts per million]

            5. HN-2 [parts per million]

            6. HN-3 [parts per million]

            7. HS [parts per million]

            8. HT [parts per million]

            9. THD [parts per million]

            10. THL [parts per million]

          3. L Agents

            1. L [parts per million]

            2. TL [parts per million]

          4. Phosgene Oxime [parts per million]

          5. Sesquimustard [parts per million]

          6. T [parts per million]

        4. Blood Agents

          1. Arsine [parts per million]

          2. Cyanogen Chloride [parts per million]

          3. Hydrogen Cyanide [parts per million]

        5. Chemical Agent Precursors

          1. Amine Experimental Drugs [parts per million]

          2. Methylphosphonic Dichloride [parts per million]

          3. Methylphosphonic Difluoride [parts per million]

          4. Phosphorus Oxychloride [parts per million]

          5. Picrate Experiments [parts per million]

          6. Pinacolyl Alcohol [parts per million]

          7. QL [parts per million]

          8. Selenide Experiments [parts per million]

          9. Thiodigylcol [parts per million]

        6. Choking Agents

          1. Chlorine Gas [parts per million]

          2. Chloropicrin [parts per million]

          3. Diphosgene [parts per million]

          4. Phosgene [parts per million]

          5. Triphosgene [parts per million]

        7. Herbicides

          1. 2,4 (Dichlorophenoxy) Acetic Acid [parts per million]

          2. 2,4,5 (Trichlorophenoxy) Acetic Acid [parts per million]

          3. Agent Blue [parts per million]

          4. Agent Orange [parts per million]

          5. Agent Pink [parts per million]

          6. Agent Purple [parts per million]

          7. Agent White [parts per million]

          8. Bromacil [parts per million]

          9. Dioxin [parts per million]

        8. Incapacitating Agents

          1. 3-Quinuclidinyl Benzilate [parts per million]

          2. Blue-X [parts per million]

        9. Nerve Agents

          1. EA5365 [parts per million]

          2. Ethyl-p-nitrophenyl Methylphosphonate [parts per million]

          3. Flash [parts per million]

          4. G Agents

            1. Dimebu [parts per million]

            2. G [parts per million]

            3. GA [parts per million]

            4. GB [parts per million]

            5. GD [parts per million]

            6. GE [parts per million]

            7. GF [parts per million]

            8. TGD [parts per million]

          5. V Agents

            1. TVX [parts per million]

            2. V [parts per million]

            3. VE [parts per million]

            4. VG [parts per million]

            5. VM [parts per million]

            6. VS [parts per million]

            7. VX [parts per million]

        10. Other Chemical Agents

          1. Acrylamides [parts per million]

          2. Butyl Salicylate [parts per million]

          3. Cadmium Chloride [parts per million]

          4. Cadmium Fluoride [parts per million]

          5. Chloroethylamine [parts per million]

          6. Chloroethylmethylamine [parts per million]

          7. Diisopropyl Fluorophosphate [parts per million]

          8. Dimethylpolysulfide [parts per million]

          9. Disulfur Decafluoride [parts per million]

          10. Neostigmine [parts per million]

          11. Phencyclidine [parts per million]

          12. Sodium Arsenite [parts per million]

        11. Psycho-Toxic Agents

          1. Antidepressants [parts per million]

          2. Antioxilytic Sedative Substances [parts per million]

          3. Neuroleptics [parts per million]

          4. Psychodisleptics [parts per million]

          5. Psychostimulators [parts per million]

        12. Tear Agents

          1. 2-Bromobenzylcyanide [parts per million]

          2. Bromoacetone [parts per million]

          3. Chloroacetophenone [parts per million]

          4. Chloroacetophenone/Chloroform Mixture [parts per million]

          5. Chloroform [ [parts per million]]

          6. CN/Benzene/Carbon Tetrachloride Mixture [parts per million]

          7. CN/Chloropicrin/Chloroform Mixture [parts per million]

          8. Ethylbromoacetate [parts per million]

          9. Orthochlorobenzylidene Malonitrile [parts per million]

        13. Vomiting Agents

          1. Vomiting Agent Arsenicals [parts per million]

            1. Diphenylaminoarsine [parts per million]

            2. Diphenylaminochloroarsine [parts per million]

            3. Diphenylchloroarsine [parts per million]

            4. Diphenylcyanoarsine [parts per million]

      3. Electromagnetic Environment (Artificial)

        1. Electronic Warfare (Electronic Combat) [watts per square meter]

        2. Nuclear Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) [webers/cubic meter/second]

        3. Directed Energy

          1. Laser Radiation (see also 1.2.5.3) [joules per square meter]

          2. Spotlight

          3. Neutron and Other Particle Beam Radiation

        4. Navigation and Guidance (e.g., missile seeker)

        5. Sensor Emission

          1. Radar Altimeter

          2. Laser Range Finders

          3. Radar

        6. Station Broadcast

          1. Radio

          2. Television

      4. Obscurants

        1. Aerosols

        2. Chaff [parts per million]

        3. Flares

          1. Infrared

          2. Illumination

        4. Laser Burnout of Sensors [joules per square meter]

        5. Radar Reflectors

        6. Smoke (visible and infrared-blocking) [parts per million]

      5. Man-Made Features

        1. Power Lines

        2. Buildings

          1. Urban Structures

          2. Rural Structures

          3. Industrial Facilities (factories, mines)

          4. Military Fortifications

        3. Lines of Communication

          1. Transportation Routes

            1. Highways

              1. Blacktop Surface

              2. Dirt Roads

          2. Railways

          3. Pipelines

          4. Structures and Crossings

          5. Ports, Harbors, Airfields

        4. Anti-Low Level Flight Netting

        5. Decoys

      6. Threat Environment

        1. Airborne Threats

          1. Aircraft

          2. Missiles

          3. Anti-Aircraft Artillery

          4. Aerial Mines

          5. Bombs

        2. Groundborne Threats

          1. Tanks

          2. Artillery

          3. Land Mines

        3. Seaborne Threats

          1. Surface Ships

          2. Submarines

          3. Sea Mines

      7. Operational Environment

    3. Operational Environment

      1. Enemy Situation

        1. Disposition of Enemy Forces

          1. Location (grid, altitude) [degrees, meters above sea level]

          2. Movement (direction, rate) [degrees, meters per second]

          3. Density (point, area)

        2. Composition of Enemy Forces

          1. Enemy Task Organization

          2. Enemy Equipment Types and Characteristics

          3. Enemy Configuration (mission equipment, loads)

        3. Strength of Enemy

          1. Enemy Unit Strength (committed, reinforcements)

            1. Enemy Personnel (percent of authorized, morale, training)

            2. Enemy Equipment (percent combat ready)

          2. Enemy Support Status

            1. Enemy Combat Support (air, nuclear, chemical)

            2. Enemy Combat Service Support

        4. Significant Activities of Enemy

          1. Recent Operations of Enemy

          2. Tempo of Operations of Enemy

        5. Vulnerabilities of Enemy

          1. Enemy Protection Levels (ballistic, chemical, electronic)

          2. Enemy Concealment (positioning)

          3. Enemy Security Procedures

      2. Friendly Situation

        1. Disposition of Friendly Forces

          1. Location of Friendly Forces (grid, altitude) [degrees, meters above sea level]

          2. Movement of Friendly Forces (direction, rate) [degrees, meters per second]

          3. Density of Friendly Forces (point, area)

        2. Composition of Friendly Forces

          1. Task Organization of Friendly Forces

          2. Equipment Types and Characteristics of Friendly Forces

          3. Configuration of Friendly Forces (mission equipment, loads)

        3. Strength of Friendly Forces

          1. Unit Strength of Friendly Forces (committed, reinforcements)

            1. Personnel of Friendly Forces (percent of authorized, morale, training)

            2. Equipment of Friendly Forces (percent combat ready)

          2. Support Status of Friendly Forces

            1. Combat Support of Friendly Forces (air, nuclear, chemical)

            2. Combat Service Support of Friendly Forces

        4. Significant Activities of Friendly Forces

          1. Tempo of Operations of Friendly Forces

          2. Civil Affairs of Friendly Forces

        5. Vulnerabilities of Friendly Forces

          1. Protection Levels of Friendly Forces (ballistic, chemical, electronic)

          2. Concealment of Friendly Forces (positioning)

          3. Security Procedures of Friendly Forces

      3. Level of Activity

        1. War

          1. Strategic War

            1. National War

            2. National Military Situation

            3. Theater War

          2. Tactical War

            1. Maneuver Battlefield Operating Systems (BOSs)

              1. Move Forces

                1. Position/Reposition Forces (units and equipment)

                  1. Prepare Forces for Movement

                  2. Move Forces On/Under Surface

                  3. 1.3.3.6.2.1.1.1.2.1 Move Forces While Mounted

                  4. 1.3.3.6.2.1.1.1.2.2 Move Forces While Dismounted

                  5. Move Forces Through Air

                  6. Close Forces Into Tactical Position

              2. Engage Enemy

                1. Employ Direct Fire

                  1. Process Direct-Fire Targets

1.3.3.6.2.1.2.1.1.1 Select Direct-Fire Targets

1.3.3.6.2.1.2.1.1.2 Select Direct-Fire System



              1. Control Terrain

                1. Control Terrain Through Fire or Fire Potential

                2. Occupy Terrain

            1. Fire Support BOSs

              1. Process Ground Targets

                1. Select Target to Attack

                2. Select Fire Support Attack System

                  1. Determine Attack System Capability

                  2. Determine Attack System Availability

                  3. Select Attack System

                3. Develop Order to Fire

              2. Engage Ground Targets

                1. Conduct Lethal Engagement

                  1. Conduct Surface Attack

                  2. Adjust/Illuminate Fire Support Targets

                  3. Request Air-to-Ground Attack

                2. Conduct Nonlethal Engagement

                  1. Reduce Enemy Personnel Effectiveness

1.3.3.6.2.2.2.2.1.1 Employ Incapacitating Agents

1.3.3.6.2.2.2.2.1.2 Conduct Battlefield Psychological Activities

1   2   3   4


The database is protected by copyright ©dentisty.org 2016
send message

    Main page