Ireland – Visa Frequently Asked Questions



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Ireland – Visa Frequently Asked Questions


24th January 2007, © Department of Justice Equality and Law Reform 2007
Disclaimer:
This document is intended to assist applicants in their dealings with the Visa Section throughout the Visa application process. As such it is intended for guidance purposes only.
This document will be updated from time to time as procedures and policies change, therefore applicants are advised to refer to the up to date version of these questions on the website before submitting any applications or documents.

Applying For a Visa





  • 1. Do I need an Irish Visa?

  • 2. What is a visa?

  • 3. How/Where do I apply for an Irish Visa?

  • 4. How long will my visa be valid for?

  • 5. Will my visa be valid for multiple trips to Ireland?

  • 6. I have no previous travel history to Ireland but it would be more convenient for me to have a multiple-entry visa. Is this possible?

  • 7. What documents do I need to submit with my application?

  • 8. Will the documents I submit be returned to me?

  • 9. Does my child need a separate visa to travel with me?

  • 10. How much does an Irish Visa application cost?

  • 11. How long does it take to process an application?

  • 12. Can my application be processed more quickly?

  • 13. How do I check the progress of my application?

  • 14. I hold a valid UK Visa. Do I need an Irish Visa?

  • 15. Will an Irish Visa allow me to Travel to Northern Ireland?

  • 16. I live in Northern Ireland & hold a valid UK Visa. Do I need an Irish Visa to enter the Republic, even on a short trip?

  • 17. I am legally resident in Northern Ireland, where can I apply for an Irish Visa?

  • 18. I hold a valid Schengen Visa. Do I require an Irish Visa?

  • 19. I will be travelling to, or am already in another country on a short stay, and wish to travel to Ireland. Can I apply for my visa in the Irish Embassy there?

  • 20. Can I come to Ireland to study?

  • 21. If I get a Study Visa can my spouse/children join me in Ireland?

  • 22. Can I come to Ireland to work?

  • 23. If I am granted permission to work in Ireland can my spouse/children come with me/join me later?

  • 24. Will my spouse be permitted to work?

  • 25. Do I qualify for a Van der Elst visa?

  • 26. I am an Irish national. My spouse is a visa-required national. Does s/he need a visa to visit/live in Ireland?




I have been granted a visa for Ireland…..





  • 27. Am I guaranteed entry to Ireland on arrival?

  • 28. What is the latest date that I can arrive in Ireland with my Visa?

  • 29. How long can I stay in Ireland?

  • 30. I am in Ireland and have a ‘C’ visa. I would now like to remain in Ireland for longer than 90 days. Is this possible?

  • 31. I have been issued with a ‘D’ visa. Can I leave Ireland and return using this visa?


I have been refused a visa for Ireland…...




  • 32. Can I appeal this decision?

  • 33. How much does an appeal cost?

  • 34. How long does it take to process an appeal?

  • 35. What documentation should I submit with my appeal?

  • 36. I believe I have submitted all of the required documentation with my application. Why was it still refused?

  • 37. If my appeal is turned down, can I make a further appeal?








Visa applications



1. Q - Do I need an Irish Visa?
A - The “Ireland Visa Requirements” document consists of two lists – Schedule 1 and Schedule 2.
Schedule 1 lists those countries whose nationals do not require a visa to enter Ireland.
Therefore nationals of all countries not mentioned on Schedule 1 will require a Visa prior to seeking entry to Ireland.
Schedule 2 refers to Transit Visas. Nationals of all countries listed in Schedule 2 require a visa to transit through Ireland.
A Transit Visa does not permit the holder to leave the port/airport. You can only transit to your onward connection and you must have a valid visa (if required) for your final destination.
For Ireland Visa Requirements (Schedules 1 & 2) Click here.
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2. Q - What is a Visa?


A - A visa is a paper document affixed to a page of the holder's passport.
It permits a person to travel to the State during the dates stated on the visa. It does not guarantee entry to the State. An Immigration Officer at the Port of Entry has the authority to grant or deny admission, and to decide on the duration a person may remain in the State.

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3. Q – How/Where do I apply for an Irish visa?
A - Application forms are available from your nearest Irish Embassy, Consulate or Visa Office, or can be downloaded from the Department of Foreign Affairs website, www.dfa.ie
If there is an Irish Embassy, Consulate, Honorary Consul or Visa Office in your country of permanent residence you must apply there. You may be required to attend for personal interview.
If there is no Irish Embassy, Consulate, Honorary Consul or Visa Office in your country of origin, another Irish Embassy or Consulate may have been designated for the purposes of processing applications from your country of permanent residence. If this is the case, you must apply in the Embassy or Consulate designated for this purpose
Please refer to the Department of Foreign Affairs website, www.dfa.ie for contact details for each Embassy or Consulate.
If there is no Irish Embassy, Consulate, Honorary Consul or Visa Office in your country of origin and no other Irish Embassy or Consulate has been designated for the purposes of processing applications from your country of permanent residence, as above, you may apply:


  1. Through any Irish Embassy or Consulate

  2. Through your reference in Ireland (however the application form must be signed by you)

  3. By direct post to the Visa Office, Irish Naturalisation & Immigration Service (INIS), Department of Justice, Equality & Law Reform, 13-14 Burgh Quay, Dublin 2, Ireland

The Department of Justice, Equality & Law Reform currently has Visa Offices in three countries – China, India and Russia.


If you are resident in China, Mongolia, or Cambodia you must apply to our office in Beijing. www.embassyofireland.cn

If you are resident in India, Bangladesh, Nepal, or Sri Lanka you must apply to our office in New Delhi. www.irelandinindia.com

If you are resident in Russia, Armenia, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Ukraine or Uzbekistan you must apply to our office in Moscow. (Embassy of Ireland, Grokholski Per 5, Moscow 129010 - Telephone: +7495 9375900)
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4. Q – How long will my visa be valid for?


A – The dates shown on a visa are the dates between which you may seek entry to the State.
There are two types of visas – C and D.

C Visas
C visas are issued for a short-term trip only, usually for the purpose of tourism, visiting family, business meetings or conferences.
The maximum duration for which the Immigration Officer will allow you remain in the State with a C visa is 90 days.
Once this time has elapsed, your permission to remain will not be extended and you must leave the State.
Your passport must be valid for at least 6 months after your intended date of departure from Ireland. If you are resident in a country other than your country of origin, your residence permit must be valid for 3 months after your intended departure form Ireland.
D Visas
If you have been issued with a D visa you are required to register with the Garda National Immigration Bureau (GNIB). You will be issued with a Garda Registration Card. The cost of registration is €100. (There are exemptions from this fee for certain categories of people).
It is advisable that your passport is valid for a period of at least 12 months as you will not be registered by GNIB beyond the expiry date of your passport, and you will be required to pay the fee each time you register. Further information is available at www.garda.ie
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5. Q – Will my visa be valid for multiple trips to Ireland?
A – All visa applications for long term stays in Ireland, e.g. for work or study purposes, will be valid for one trip only. Once you have registered with the GNIB you may apply for a multi- journey re-entry visa. (See Q31)
It is not our general practice to issue multiple-entry visas for short-term visits unless you have shown a compliant travel history to Ireland in the recent past.
If you have held 2 previous Irish visas and have observed the conditions of these visas – e.g. have not overstayed or worked illegally, then you may apply for a multi-entry visa.
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6. Q – I have no previous travel history to Ireland but it would be more convenient for me to have a multi-entry visa. Is this possible?
A - There are certain circumstances where we will issue multi-entry visas to applicants with no previous travel history to Ireland.
For example, you can apply for a multi-entry visa if:


  • You need to travel regularly to Ireland on short visits for business meetings. You should submit evidence of this from your employer and the company in Ireland with whom you are engaging in business (where relevant)




  • While in Ireland on business, you need to travel to another country, returning to Ireland for further meetings, or onward travel




  • You are travelling to and from another country, via Ireland

If you are travelling to/from Northern Ireland please see questions 16 & 17


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7. Q - What documents do I need to submit with my application?
A - There are certain documents that must accompany an application. This will depend on the type of visa applied for. A list of minimum requirements for each type of visa is available here
Applicants should note that the Department is under no obligation to contact you, or your reference in Ireland, to seek further information or documentation. The onus is on you to provide all the required documentation at the time of submission of your application.
However, if a Visa Officer needs further information in order to make a decision on your application they may contact you or your reference in Ireland.
Please note that ALL documents must be in English, or accompanied by a notarized English translation. Applications with non-translated documents will be returned or refused.
The Department of Foreign Affairs and / or the Department of Justice, Equality and Law Reform may refuse to accept any application for processing where the applicant has not supplied the required documents, or all documents are not translated.
The provision of false, fraudulent or misleading information will result in the refusal of your application and no appeal will be permitted. It will also seriously affect any future applications you submit for an Irish visa.
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8. Q – Will the documents I submit be returned to me?
A - It is advisable that you keep copies of all documents submitted with your application. Original documents such as marriage/birth certificates will be returned to you. However, bank statements, letters of invitation etc will not be returned.
If there are specific documents that you wish to have returned to you, please submit a list of these with your application.
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9. Q - Does my child need a separate visa to travel with me?
A – If your child is travelling using his/her own passport then a separate visa will be required. A separate visa application form must be completed and relevant fee paid. The fee for a visa is the same for adults and children.
If your child is included on your passport, and will be travelling with you using your passport only, then a separate visa is not required. However, you must clearly state on your application form that you wish your child included on your visa. There is only one visa fee payable in such cases.
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10. Q - How much does an Irish Visa application cost?
A – The non-refundable Visa Application Processing Fees apply as follows:
SINGLE-JOURNEY €60.00

MULTIPLE-JOURNEY €100.00



TRANSIT €25.00
Communications charges may also be levied in some cases and information in this regard, and on the fee in your local currency, is available from your local Embassy or Consulate.
Some applicants are not required to pay a fee. This includes visa-required spouses and certain family members of EEA citizens (including Irish nationals) provided that proof of the relationship is provided with the application.
In addition applicants from some countries are not required to pay a fee. As this changes from time to time information in this regard should be sought from your local Embassy or Consulate
Please note that the Visa fee is an administration fee which covers the cost of processing your application. This fee cannot be refunded if your application is refused.
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11. Q - How long does it take to process an application?
A- In some cases, applications can be processed locally in the Irish Embassy, Consulate or Visa Office in your country of origin in a very short period of time.
If your application does not fall into the category of applications that can be processed locally, it will be referred to Dublin for processing by the Department of Justice, Equality and Law Reform.
This office endeavours to deal with all applications in the fastest possible time. Incomplete applications, lack of documentation, or submission of non-translated documents results in delays for everyone.
To allow for the possible transfer of your application to Dublin you should submit your application 8 weeks in advance of proposed date of travel. (For applicants legally resident in Northern Ireland please also see questions 16 & 17)
We advise applicants not to pay for airline or other travel tickets without having been issued with a visa.
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12. Q – Can my application be processed more quickly?
A - In order to ensure that all visa applicants receive fair and equal treatment, applications are dealt with in the order that they are received.
You should check current processing times with your local Irish Embassy, Consulate, or Visa Office at the time of application.
In exceptional cases, where it can be demonstrated that extenuating circumstances exist, applications may be processed ahead of schedule.
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13. Q - How do I check the progress of my application?
A – It is not possible at present to track the progress of your application. However, you will be notified as soon as a decision on your application has been made. Visa decisions are also published every Friday on our website. Click here to view the list of visa decisions. You can check this list by using the reference number which issues to you when you submit your application.
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14. Q – I hold a valid UK Visa, do I need an Irish visa to travel to the Republic of Ireland?
A – Yes.
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15. Q - Will an Irish visa allow me to travel to Northern Ireland?
A - No – If you wish to travel to Northern Ireland you will require a UK Visa.
If you are travelling to the Republic of Ireland, and you intend to also visit Northern Ireland and return to the Republic, you must obtain a multiple-entry Irish visa and a UK visa.
If your main destination is Northern Ireland but you arrive in, and depart from the Republic of Ireland, you must first obtain a UK visa, and then a multi-entry Irish visa.
Northern Ireland consists of Counties Antrim, Armagh, Derry, Down, Fermanagh and Tyrone.
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16. Q – I live in Northern Ireland and hold a valid UK visa. Do I need an Irish visa to enter the Republic even on a short trip?
A – Yes. You will be required by Immigration Officials at border crossings to show that you hold a valid Irish visa.
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17. Q – I am legally resident in Northern Ireland, where can I apply for an Irish visa?
A – You may submit your application by post either to the Irish Embassy in London or to the Visa Section in Dublin
If applying through London any fees payable must be paid in pounds sterling (bank draft, money order, or postal order).
If applying through Dublin they must be paid in Euro (bank draft or postal order only).
Personal cheques are not accepted by either office
The relevant addresses are:

Visa Office

Embassy of Ireland

106 Brompton Road

London SW3 1JJ
Or
Visa Section (Ground Floor)

Irish Naturalisation & Immigration Service

13-14 Burgh Quay

Dublin 2
The documents required are:

Application form fully completed

2 passport sized photos

Passport containing valid UK visa/permission to reside

Letter outlining purpose of journey

Fee - €60 for single entry, €100 for multiple entry – if applying through Dublin

Fee - £42stg for single entry, £70 for multiple entry – if applying through London



Your application will be processed within 5-10 working days and your passport will be returned to you by registered post.
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18. Q - I hold a valid Schengen Visa, do I need an Irish visa to come to the Republic of Ireland?
A - Yes
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19. Q – I will be travelling to, or I am already in, another country on a short visit before travelling to Ireland. Can I apply for my Irish visa in the Irish Embassy/Consulate there?
A – You should apply for a visa in your country of residence. (See Q 4). If however, there are valid reasons or circumstances which prevented you from doing so prior to your departure, you may outline these in your application and submit it to the nearest Irish Embassy/Consulate.
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20. Q - Can I come to Ireland to study?
A - Information on study visa applications is available here. If you meet the criteria outlined in this document you can apply for a study visa and your application will be considered.
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21. Q – If I get a Study Visa can my spouse/children join me in Ireland?
A – It is not the general policy of this Department to allow family members of study visa holders, permission to join them in Ireland

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22. Q - Can I come to Ireland to work?
A - If you are a national of a country which is not a member of the European Economic Area (EEA) and you wish to work in Ireland, you will require permission from the Department of Enterprise, Trade and Employment to do so.
For full information on employment permits please visit the Department of Enterprise, Trade and Employment’s website at www.entemp.ie.
Please note that the visa application process and the employment permit application process are separate. The granting of an employment permit does not necessarily guarantee that a Visa will be issued.
If you have been granted an employment permit you should apply for a visa through your local Irish Embassy, Consulate, Honorary Consulate or Visa Office.
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23. Q – If I get permission to work in Ireland can my spouse/children come with me/join me later?
A – Please click here for information on Family Reunification for Workers
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24. Q – Will my spouse be permitted to work?
A - Permission to work is granted by the Department of Enterprise Trade & Employment. That Department is currently considering extending the Spousal Work Permits Scheme to include spouses of all holders of employment permits. You should check their website for updates on this scheme. www.entemp.ie
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25. Q – Do I qualify for a Van der Elst Visa?
A – Holders of a Van der Elst visa do not require an employment permit to work in Ireland.
To qualify for such a visa you must be lawfully employed in another EU Member State.
You must be coming to Ireland to provide services on behalf of your employer.
You will need to submit the following documentation with your Visa Application:

  • Fully completed and signed Visa Application Form




  • Passport




  • Evidence of your right to reside & work in the EU Member State you are coming from, and that your permission to return there will be valid following termination of the contract in Ireland.




  • Declaration from your employer confirming that you are lawfully employed by that company, that you are coming to Ireland to provide services on the company’s behalf, the name and contact details for the company in Ireland, and that you will be returning to work in the other EU Member State following completion of the project in Ireland.



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26. Q - I am an Irish national. My spouse is a visa required national. Does s/he need a visa to visit/live in Ireland?
A – Yes. Please check here for the documentation you must submit with the visa application.
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I have been granted a visa for Ireland….



27. Q – Does this guarantee me entry to Ireland on my arrival?
A - The granting of a visa is in effect only a form of pre-clearance. A visa only permits you to travel to the State and seek entry during the validity period of the visa. It does not grant permission to enter or reside in the State; this permission is given by the Immigration Officer who has the authority to grant or deny such admission.
An Immigration Officer is entitled to question any person on arrival. If they are not satisfied with the bona-fides of any person, their documents, or their reasons for wishing to enter the State, they have the right to deny entry to any such person, despite the fact they hold a valid visa.
You are advised to carry supporting documentation related to the purpose of your journey in your hand luggage, for presentation to the Immigration Officer at the port of entry.
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28. Q - What is the latest date that I can arrive in Ireland with my Visa?
A - The dates shown on a visa are the dates between which you may seek entry to the State.
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29. Q - How long can I stay in Ireland?
A - If you have been issued with a ‘C’ visa, this will be determined by an Immigration Officer. However, 90 days is the maximum duration you will be allowed remain in the State on this type of visa.
If you have been issued with a ‘D’ visa, the duration of stay will depend on a number of factors, including, for workers, the renewal of employment permits, or for students, satisfactory attendance & progress at school/college. You must register with the Garda National Immigration Bureau who will decide on the duration you will be permitted to stay.
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30. Q – I am in Ireland and have a ‘C’ visa. I would now like to stay longer than 90 days. Is this possible?
A – No. The maximum time you can stay in Ireland on this visa is 90 days.
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31. Q – I have been issued with a ‘D’ visa. Can I leave Ireland and return using this Visa?
A – If the number of journeys indicated on your visa is ‘01’ then you can only enter the State once on this visa. When you have registered with the Garda National Immigration Bureau (GNIB), you can then apply for a ‘Re-entry Visa’.
If you apply for a multiple journey re-entry visa, it will be valid from the date of issue until the expiry date on the Registration Card issued to you by the GNIB, or the expiry date of your passport, whichever is earliest.
This will allow you to leave and re-enter the State any number of times within the dates shown on your visa.
If you apply for a single journey re-entry visa, this will only be valid for one entry to the State within the dates shown on the visa, which will be for 90 days from the date of issue. (It will not be valid for the duration of your GNIB card).
To avoid having to apply for further visas for the duration of your permission to remain, you should apply for a multiple-entry re-entry visa.
Please click here for further information on Re-entry Visas.

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I have been refused a visa for Ireland……..


32 - Q - Can I appeal this decision?
A - If you are refused a Visa you may appeal this decision by writing to:
Visa Appeals Officer

Visa Section

Irish Naturalisation & Immigration Service

13/14 Burgh Quay



Dublin 2
Appeals must be in writing and posted to the Visa Appeals Officer at the above address. Faxed or emailed appeals will not be considered.
If you made your visa application to one of our offices in Beijing, Moscow or New Delhi, you must submit your appeal to the relevant office. Please see Q3 for contact details.
Only one appeal may be lodged in respect of any application and must be received within 2 months of the refusal date.
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33. Q - How much does an appeal cost?
A - There is no charge for an appeal against a refusal of a Visa.
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34. Q - How long does it take to process an appeal?
A – Your appeal will be dealt with as speedily as possible. At present it takes 1-2 weeks.
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35. Q – What documentation should I submit with my appeal?
A – This will depend on a number of factors – the type of visa you applied for, the reasons your application was refused, and your own personal circumstances.
You should submit any relevant documentation that will address the reasons given for the refusal of your visa application. The onus is on you to satisfy the Visa Appeals Officer that you should be granted a visa, and that you will observe the conditions of any visa issued.
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36. Q – I believe I have submitted all of the required documents. Why was my application refused?
A – While there is a comprehensive list of documents required for each of the various categories of visa, provision of these documents does not guarantee that a visa will be issued.
Please examine carefully the reasons given for refusing your visa application, and ensure that you address all the issues in your appeal.
The onus is on you to make a convincing case as to why you should be granted a visa, and provide relevant material to support your case.

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37. Q – If my appeal is turned down can I make a further appeal?
A – No – Only one appeal can be made for each application. If your appeal is rejected, you must make a new visa application.
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