International development association project appraisal document



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Social Sustainability. Involvement of the community and the Ayil Okmotus (along with the DDWSWD) in project planning, design, financing and implementation will more likely result in locally acceptable and sustainable technical and institutional solutions. Critical to social sustainability will be the enhancement of service delivery and a demonstration that services meet customer expectations and needs, through a transparent and efficient process. The project will involve close community consultation and participation in design and implementation phases, a process which will support a sense of ownership over the investments. Education and communication programs will be implemented to induce knowledge, attitude and behavioral changes targeted towards a range of drinking water and sanitation issues, and citizen engagement mechanisms will be introduced to enhance accountability and recourse.

  • Institutional Sustainability: The overarching goal for improving water sector governance is to create a coordinated and responsive institutional framework, where the roles and responsibilities of actors are clear. This will facilitate the creation of an enabling environment for service providers—utilities and communities— through which quality and affordable services can be provided to households and businesses. The project will provide capacity building and technical assistance for the national and local agencies, and will closely engage them in project implementation and supervision, which will contribute to the ownership of project activities and outcomes.

  • Financial Sustainability. Financial sustainability will be supported by a range of activities addressing the issue both at the central and local levels. Specifically, this will include a focus on strengthening the capacity of water service providers, in terms of commercial systems, technical skills, and customer relations. The objective is to enable operators to provide affordable services of acceptable quality, which satisfy customer expectations and allow sufficient financial revenues to be generated and sustained over time. As part of this process, the project will introduce modern practices of applying consumption-based, cost-reflective tariffs – which consider operating and maintenance costs, and include a reserve for asset replacement over time. Furthermore, financial sustainability objectives have been considered in the system design process and proposed activities incorporate findings from ability and willingness to pay assessments12. Support at the central level will revolve around creating an enabling environment, through improved financial regulation and institutional mechanisms to support service delivery in rural areas.

  • Technical Sustainability. The project will apply technical design standards and methods, which will support operational sustainability. This will include careful consideration of water source options (quality, quantity, security / climate resilience13, and operational implications), life-cycle costs, disinfection approaches and operational capacity constraints. The selected water supply investments will support the piloting of an aggregation approach, in which provision of technical services for maintenance and repair can be introduced in a viable way. In addition, the focus on the modernization of technical standards and designs will provide water supply schemes that can be managed efficiently and operate reliably; meeting customer demands for levels of service and affordability.

  • Environmental Sustainability: The project design has integrated principles of environmental sustainability. Specifically, this will include assessments of sustainable yields, water source protection, water conservation (particularly targeting wasteful irrigation practices and losses due to poor operations and maintenance), and systems to support safe collection and disposal of wastewater and sludge.




    1. It is intended that the project provide programmatic support at the national level, related to sector policy, planning, and regulations, and at the local level, to enable or create conditions for sustainable water and sanitation service delivery in the project areas beyond the lifetime of the project.




    1. KEY RISKS

      1. Overall Risk Rating and Explanation of Key Risks

    1. The overall risk for the project is Substantial. The risk rating proposed by the team takes into account the implementation experience of the RWSSP-2, capacity of the responsible agencies and complexities associated with the context and institutional development agenda.




    1. The Substantial rating for risks associated with the Political and Governance and Macroeconomic categories are common to all Bank-financed operations and are informed by the Bank’s analysis of the Kyrgyz Republic’s performance in such categories, which consider the general risks associated with the operating environment. These are considered common portfolio issues and are addressed through systematic monitoring, training and capacity building activities implemented under the guidance of the country management unit.




    1. The risk rating for sector strategies and policies has been rated as Substantial to reflect significant challenges associated with the implementation of the water sector strategy, which requires substantial financing, strong Government commitment and parliamentary support. It is acknowledged that the capacity-strengthening activities at the central and local levels will require time and sustained efforts. Moreover, risks associated with the Institutional Capacity for Implementation and Sustainability have also been rated as Substantial. This risk rating reflects existing capacity constraints at the local (Ayil Okmotus) and central (DDWSWD) levels, which may affect sustainability of water service delivery. During project preparation however, key capacity issues have been identified and relevant activities have been included into the design to strengthen these institutions to fulfill their mandate. Potential institutional risks associated with project implementation have been mitigated through engaging ARIS in the process.




    1. In summary, despite this being the third in a series of projects, some Substantial risks are still apparent. These relate largely to the operating environment and include institutional capacity constraints. The Bank and the implementing agencies are both cognizant of the risks and have incorporated elements into the project design for mitigation, building upon experience of previous projects and incorporating lessons learned into the project design. Activities included under the project are demand-driven and have strong ownership at various levels. With sufficient support during implementation from the Government and the Bank, potential risks can be readily identified and resolved.




    1. The “Other” Substantial risk identified during preparation was related to potential legacy issues, which refers to unquantified, unresolved issues from previous projects (financed by ADB and World Bank). Early stages of RWSSP-2 were burdened by such issues, which resulted in a reallocation of funds mid-course to rectify uncompleted technical problems and address outstanding community concerns from the previous project (RWSSP-1). These concerns, if they arise, have the potential to disrupt investment plans identified and appraised under this project. In recognition of these potential risks, the Bank carried out an assessment of potential legacy issues during preparation and agreed with MoF that two sub-projects14 in Issyk-Kul oblast will be included in the first phase of investments, to ensure outstanding issues are resolved. Furthermore, this topic has been specifically addressed through the design of the citizen engagement activities and grievance redress mechanism (GRM) for the project, which outline specific procedures for managing such issues, if they arise.




    1. APPRAISAL SUMMARY

      1. Economic Analysis

    1. The economic benefits from the project are generated by improved quality of water supply services to households and improved sanitation services in schools, pre-schools and other public buildings. Improving these services will enhance welfare by reducing coping costs (for example, time saved from water collection, reduced need for in-house drinking water treatment). Improving the quality of water supply, sanitation services, and hygiene practices—through the WASH educational program—are also expected to produce welfare benefits through improved health.




    1. The project’s economic analysis relies on activities identified during project preparation to assess benefit and cost streams. It includes (i) the cost of all project components, including estimated O&M costs and project implementation costs and (ii) all measurable benefits, including decreases in the time spent collecting water, welfare gains at household level associated with reduced need for in-house treatment (for example, boiling of water), and reduced incidence of water-related diseases such as infectious hepatitis and acute enteric infections as a result of improved access to quality water and decline in the reliance on standing water sources. Expected benefits are based on results observed from similar projects in the country—the STICBP, RWSSP1 and 2, and BOUIP and BOUIP-AF. As with all economic analyses, the costs are perfectly observed while the benefits are not.




    1. The estimated ERR is 13 percent and the NPV is US$19.99 million, assuming a social discount rate of 5 percent,15 20 years of asset life of water supply systems, including the project implementation period, with corresponding benefits to be realized starting in 2021. A sensitivity analysis was conducted, analyzing a reduction of 20, 40 and 50 percent of expected benefits, an increase in costs by 10, 25 and 45 percent and an increase in project implementation by 1 and 2 years. In all cases, ERR rates remained above 5 percent, respectively, which support the economic rationale for the proposed project. Annex 5 provides additional information.




      1. Technical

    1. The Bank has reviewed and confirmed that the proposed investments reflect Government priorities and are aligned with strategic sector principles addressing key technical issues. The infrastructure solutions proposed are considered technically sound concepts, supported by engineering investigations and designs, and take into account operational capacity constraints and life-cycle costs to promote project sustainability. More specifically, to enable access to water supply services in the project areas existing infrastructure will be rehabilitated or replaced and distribution coverage will be expanded. Where technically viable, a single system will be developed to supply multiple villages within the project areas. A comprehensive approach, including consideration of alternative water sources and climatic factors, has been applied to optimize designs and reduce costs, which will address the infrastructure backlog in the project areas and allow the Ayil Okmotus to meet increasing demands associated with population growth. Furthermore, the selection of rural villages to be included under the project and proposed investments will leverage and support the institutional reforms by establishing models for aggregated systems, which extend services to areas beyond the local government boundaries—that is, serving multiple Ayil Okmotus. Fourteen such sub-projects have been identified and prioritized for financing under SRWSSDP. For each sub-project, a concept-level design has been prepared and the Bank specialists, along with representatives of the Government, have assessed and verified the existing conditions and proposed concepts.




    1. Cost estimates have been prepared and reviewed by the Bank. The estimates are based on a comparison of costs from RWSSP-2 and include provisions for escalation and contingencies. The proposed contract packaging considers potential technical and procurement risks and geographical constraints, and where possible seeks to increase efficiency through economies of scale (by grouping similar investments into larger packages). Moreover, the procurement packaging and implementation timeframes were reviewed from a technical perspective, and it was confirmed that the approach incorporates lessons learned though the experience of RWSSP-2 and is considered achievable within the project duration.




    1. Detailed engineering designs and preparation of bidding documents have commenced for three of the sub-projects, with a total value of around US$7.0 million (25 percent of the total project costs). Advance procurement activities are expected to start prior to project effectiveness to ensure readiness for implementation. The first packages will include:


    Works

    • Rehabilitation and Construction of Water Supply System, Kyrgyz-Ata, Osh Oblast (covering 3 villages, serving around 16,202 people).

    • Rehabilitation and Construction of Water Supply System, Togotoi, Osh Oblast (covering one village, serving 2,267 people).

    • Rehabilitation and Construction of Water Supply System, Sultan, Chui Oblast (covering 9 villages, serving 8,479 people).


    Consultancy

    • Detailed engineering designs and preparation of tender documents for four sub-projects in Osh oblast

    • Detailed engineering designs and preparation of tender documents for five sub-projects in Chui oblast




    1. Further details on the technical concepts guiding the water supply investments under component 1 are presented in Annex 2.




    1. The retrofitting works for sanitation facilities in schools, kindergartens/pre-schools, and health clinics will build upon the successful implementation models and experience developed through the RWSSP-2. Standard designs will be prepared in consultation with the Ministry of Education and Ministry of Health and applied (and adapted as required) where possible to selected social institutions within project areas. The project will cover all schools and kindergartens in the target rural communities. The planning costs allocated for this activity are around US$30,000 per school / kindergarten, or US$1,380,000 in total for 46 facilities within the project areas. This will adequately cover these institutions, and is estimated to provide services to more than 16,000 students. Any remaining funds will be used to upgrade sanitation facilities in other eligible social facilities (including health clinics) – decided in consultation with the Ayil Okmotus and on demand basis. These works will complement the water supply investments and together will contribute to improved development outcomes. Component 2 activities will be managed directly by ARIS, who will contract individuals (or small firms / NGOs as appropriate) for design and supervision of works. Small works contracts will be used for implementation of the facility upgrades/retrofitting.




      1. Financial Management

    1. The project’s Financial Management (FM) assessment established that FM arrangements existing in ARIS meet Bank requirements. The assessment took into account ARIS’s significant past experience in implementing Bank-funded projects, including adequate staffing of the FM function and documentation of the FM arrangements in the draft POM. FM arrangements, including budgeting and planning, internal control procedures, and staffing of the FM function are adequate. With respect to accounting and reporting, ARIS will use the system based on the existing accounting software, which will be modified for the accounting and financial reporting purposes of the SRWSSDP. The accounting software is specifically designed to meet Bank-financed project requirements, including the ability to generate IFRs, attachments of withdrawal applications, including SOEs, and annual financial statements. The annual audits of project financial statements will be provided to the Association within six months after the end of each fiscal year and at project closing. The Recipient has agreed to disclose the audit reports for the project within one month of their receipt from the auditors by posting the reports on the ARIS website. Following the Bank’s formal receipt of these reports, the Bank will make them publicly available according to the Bank’s Policy on Access to Information. As part of the project’s implementation support and supervision missions, quarterly IFRs will be reviewed and regular risk-based FM missions will be conducted. More details on FM arrangements are provided in Annex 3 and 4.




    1. Disbursements from the IDA Credit and Grant Accounts will follow the transaction-based method, that is, traditional Bank procedures, including advances to designated accounts, direct payments, Special Commitments and reimbursement (with full documentation and against SOEs). Two separate (Credit and Grant) designated accounts will be opened in a commercial bank acceptable to the Bank. For payments above the minimum application size, which will be specified in the Disbursement Letter, ARIS may submit withdrawal applications to the Bank for payments to suppliers and consultants directly from the Credit and Grant Accounts. Disbursement arrangements will be detailed in the Disbursement Letter.




      1. Procurement

    1. A procurement capacity assessment was conducted for the SRWSSDP, which confirmed that the procurement capacity in ARIS meets Bank requirements. Procurement for the SRWSSDP will be carried out in accordance with “Guidelines: Procurement of Goods, Works and Non-consulting services under International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) Loans and International Development Association (IDA) Credits and Grants by World bank Borrowers,” dated January 2011 (revised July 2014); “Guidelines: Selection and Employment of Consultants under IBRD loans and IDA Credits and Grants by World Bank Borrowers,” dated January 2011 (revised July 2014); and the provisions of the legal agreement.




    1. ARIS has been effectively managing procurement activities under the BOUIP, the Village Investment Project 2, and RWSSP-2. The main office of ARIS is staffed by four well-qualified and experienced procurement specialists, one of which will be dedicated to the SRWSSDP team. Two small oblast-level liaison offices will ensure adequate coverage of the country and provide administrative and logistical support for ARIS field staff. Risk and mitigation measures were agreed and have been satisfactorily addressed by ARIS. The key issues and risks include: (i) potential risk of delays in the implementation of the project due to the complexity of procurement processes and decision-making that involves local governments, and (ii) insufficient contract monitoring and contract management skills. The corresponding mitigation measures include: (i) ensuring the publication of procurement notices and contract award information as required by the Bank Procurement and Consultant Guidelines, including publication on the E-GP website; (ii) preparation of the POM, including a procurement section detailing procurement arrangements and an independent complaint handling mechanism, including for contract management; (iii) enhanced contract management through the hiring international individual consultants; (iv) prompt recording, communication to the Bank, and addressing of all complaints received from any supplier or consultant relating to the procurement and contract management process; and (v) maintenance of up-to-date procurement records.




    1. ARIS in consultation with DDWSWD, developed the Procurement Plan for the first 18 months of project implementation. This plan, dated August 17, 2016, will be updated annually or as required to reflect the actual project implementation needs and improvements in institutional capacity. The procurement arrangements are presented in Annex 3.




      1. Social (including Safeguards)

    1. Project preparation benefited from analysis of outcomes and lessons learned from the two preceding projects. The project is expected to have positive social impacts such as improved water accessibility, hygiene, and sanitation standards in the project communities, which in turn have positive impacts on the quality of life, especially of women, children and vulnerable groups. Improved sanitation practices and greater awareness of the population is expected to have a trickle-down effect on the health situation of the population. The main project beneficiaries include residents of the participating communities. At the same time, awareness raising campaign and greater involvement of civil society, local and national level governance institutions will ensure a broader project impact and change in cultural practices in hygiene and sanitation.




    1. Involuntary Resettlement (OP 4.12): Project activities related to the rehabilitation of existing and/or construction of new water supply systems (component 1) in the target areas and investments for retrofitting existing sanitary facilities under component 2 are likely to have temporary and permanent land-acquisition implications. Therefore, OP 4.12 Involuntary Resettlement has been triggered and a resettlement policy framework (RPF) prepared for the project. The RPF public consultations were held on February 11, and June 23, 2016 in Bishkek and February 16, June 24 2016, in Osh –including participants from each target rural community. Feedback from the consultations was reflected in the revised final document, disclosed both in-country and at the Infoshop on July 6, 2016 and July 7, 2016 respectively. The RPF provides guidance on the preparation of resettlement action plans (RAPs) during project implementation.




    1. Gender. Women make up more than a half of the population of the project area. Women tend to be responsible for households activities, including provision of water, cleaning and sanitation. Surveys carried out under RWSSP-2, indicate that some 80 percent of those tasked with collecting household water (for example, for drinking/bathing/washing) were women. Furthermore, time spent for this activity is significant, due to long distances to the nearest water sources (for example, standpipe or canals). At the same time, women’s participation in the decision-making process, especially at the local level, is limited. Traditional decision-making mechanisms in rural areas of the Kyrgyz Republic tend to involve largely men and exclude women and youth from the process16. The project will support active participation of women and seek to address specific gender-related needs, including gender-informed activities to support inclusion and equality. Under component 2, the design and implementation of awareness campaigns will include a central role for women’s groups. This approach acknowledges that women are often powerful agents of change at the household level; provide an important gender perspective to the issues; and give’s voice to women in the community. In the Kyrgyz Republic, the number of women’s groups is relatively low, and yet they are active and focus on specific needs of women in the country.17. The project includes gender-disaggregated indicators in the Results Framework.




    1. Citizen Engagement. Citizens have and will continue to be engaged in identifying priority project activities through consultations with different groups of stakeholders and feedback from direct and indirect project beneficiaries on proposed project activities. More specifically, under component 1, local community members will be involved in the project at all stages: detailed design, monitoring, and evaluation/lesson learning. Under component 2, in shaping and implementing information campaigns, different groups of beneficiaries, and particularly women’s groups, will be involved in formulating and passing on the message about proper sanitary practices and hygiene. As part of component 3, the project will promote service-oriented management that will include feedback from consumers on the services provided to them. Some of the Citizen Engagement undertakings would be supported through technical assistance under the institutional development component and incorporates citizen perceptions of project activities and processes.




    1. These information/awareness-building and demand-side processes will be supplemented by a grievance redress mechanism (GRM) which will cover all aspects of project implementation, including, inter alia, grievances related to involuntary resettlement. The GRM will also include a pro-active element through which ARIS will seek comment from beneficiaries once a year, as well as establishing the systems for receiving and processing unsolicited comments/complaints. GRM data will be collected, compiled and reported in quarterly reports, including an analysis of the different types of complaints. Grievances will be discussed during Bank implementation support missions with a view to responding to feedback and adapting project procedures causing harm to beneficiaries.




    1. Conflict Filters. SRWSSDP has taken into account the findings of a Conflict Filter assessment carried out during project preparation. Key sources of potential tension and conflict were identified and include: (i) inequality of services (access and quality) within the project areas; (ii) perception of or actual implementation delays; (iii) social resistance for tariff increases; (iv) change in water-use behaviors and practices; and (v) transparency and governance issues. These issues will be addressed through a range of technical, social and institutional support mechanisms. A summary of mitigation measures include: (i) engaging during both project preparation and implementation in pro-active communication that explain to both beneficiaries and the public at large the benefits brought by the project to the target communities; (ii) applying clear and transparent criteria for investment selection and design, including technical, social and economic/poverty indicators; (iii) developing suitable grievance redress standards and measures for the project (not only for safeguards-related issues); and (iv) identifying early on the propensity to social tensions and/or possible conflicts in the project areas by requesting ARIS to assess such risks as part of its social and environmental impact checks.




      1. Environment (including Safeguards)

    1. The SRWSSDP will not finance any activities with significant or irreversible environmental impacts, and therefore is classified as Environmental Category "B". The Project will focus on achieving concrete, verifiable and sustainable results in the improvement of water supply and sanitation service delivery to participating rural communities. While the environmental impact of the proposed project will be largely positive, some adverse impacts may be generated. The identified positive environmental impacts of the project include (i) improved water management and efficiency through replacement of leaking pipes and production systems, replacement of continuously running communal stand pipes with household stand-pipes, and installation of individual meters, together with support for improved operations; (ii) the overall water consumption for respective rural systems, will be less than actual quantities and original design/planning estimates due to efficiency gains; (iii) help in protecting ground and surface water resources by promoting the construction and use of environmentally sound sanitation facilities for human waste disposal; (iv) improved citizens’ skills and awareness in planning and implementation of local activities, with particular attention to environment protection, and (v) sustainable management of improved infrastructure by communities, which will bring environmental and social benefits related to natural resources management.




    1. The potential estimated environmental issues associated with the small/medium scale activities for local communities will be limited, temporary nuisances resulting from construction activities, and may include: (i) increased pollution due to construction waste; (ii) generation of dust, noise, and vibration due to the movement of construction vehicles and machinery; (iii) associated risks due to improper disposal of construction waste and asbestos, or minor operational or accidental spills of fuel and lubricants from the construction machinery; (iv) improper reinstatement of construction sites upon completion of works. These potential environmental impacts are readily identifiable, small in scale, and minimal in impact and can be effectively prevented, minimized, or mitigated by including into the work contracts specific measures to be taken by contractors under close supervision of compliance by ARIS. Use of construction materials that are hazardous to human health (for example, asbestos and asbestos-contained materials [ACM]) will not be permitted. ACM waste will be collected, transported and finally disposed by applying special protective measures in accordance with hazardous waste handling standards.




    1. Effective measures have been put in place under the SRWSSDP to address and closely monitor safeguards issues. An Environmental and Social Management Framework (ESMF) for the project consistent with Environmental Assessment (OP 4.01) requirements was prepared by ARIS and found satisfactory by the World Bank. The ESMF public consultations were held on February 11, and June 23, 2016 in Bishkek and February 16, June 24 2016, in Osh –including participants from each target rural community. The final ESMF documents in both Russian and English languages were disclosed in country and on the Bank Infoshop on July 4, 2016 and July 6, 2016 respectively. The ESMF will be incorporated into the POM. Each activity to be financed under the project will be reviewed for safeguards risks in line with OP4.01, and must obtain the clearances required by Kyrgyz national regulations.




    1. Site-specific Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMPs) will be prepared for each activity. Implementation of environmental mitigation and compliance measures during the RWSSP-2 was carried out by the contractors (construction firms) and monitored by ARIS staff (engineers). This practice will continue under the SRWSSDP. During implementation, ARIS will have overall management responsibility for ensuring that the measures indicated in the EMP are being properly performed. ARIS, in collaboration with the local authorities of the participating rural communities and the Kyrgyz Forestry and Environment Preservation Agency, will perform the environmental monitoring during both construction and operation phases, as specified in the monitoring plan of the ESMP. Appropriate training on Bank safeguards will continue to be provided under the SRWSSDP to local officials, contractors, and community representatives.




    1. The project will not finance Category-A activities, will not support activities that target natural habitats or protected sites, and will prohibit those activities that can cause a significant loss or degradation of any significant natural habitat. The environmental screening process will check for the presence of physical cultural resources. In addition, chance find procedures will be included in all works contracts.




    1. Institutional Safeguards Arrangements: ARIS will be responsible for safeguards management under the proposed project. With qualified personnel and well established systems, ARIS has demonstrated their capacity and developed a strong record of experience with environmental and social safeguards aspects of projects financed by the Bank and other international and bilateral donors, including RWSSP-2. Furthermore, as per the Bank’s recommendations during preparation, ARIS has started to broaden their capacity for safeguards management through engaging and training new staff in this field.




      1. Other Safeguards Policies Triggered

    1. Projects on International Waterways (OP/BP 7.50). OP 7.50 has been triggered because the project will finance rehabilitation, improvement, or minor additions/expansions to drinking water supply systems located within the transboundary basin of the Syr Darya, Talas and Chui Rivers. However, project interventions are not expected to adversely affect water quality or quantity to downstream other riparian states. It is anticipated that the nature of Project activities will not (i) cause appreciable harm to the other riparian states as it will not adversely change the quality or quantity of water flows, and (ii) will not be appreciably harmed by other riparian state’s possible water use. Infrastructure rehabilitation and modernization and water supply management improvements should increase system efficiency, thereby generating water savings and providing users with a reliable water supply. Further, the project aims to improve efficiency of water use and to substantially reduce technical losses and high water consumption rates. Leakages will be reduced through infrastructure rehabilitation and replacement which will help conserve ground and surface water resources. Water conservation will be promoted through improved demand-management measures, i.e., replacement of continuously running communal stand pipes, replacement of communal stand pipes with household stand-pipes, and installation of individual meters.




    1. The Exception from the requirement to notify other riparian’s under OP 7.50 has been granted because the nature of the Project activities meet the policy requirements mentioned in paragraph 1 (i) and (ii) above.



      1. World Bank Grievance Redress Service (GRS)




    1. Communities and individuals who believe that they are adversely affected by a World Bank (WB) supported project may submit complaints to existing project-level grievance redress mechanisms or the WB’s Grievance Redress Service (GRS). The GRS ensures that complaints received are promptly reviewed in order to address project-related concerns. Project affected communities and individuals may submit their complaint to the WB’s independent Inspection Panel which determines whether harm occurred, or could occur, as a result of WB non-compliance with its policies and procedures. Complaints may be submitted at any time after concerns have been brought directly to the World Bank's attention, and Bank Management has been given an opportunity to respond. For information on how to submit complaints to the World Bank’s corporate Grievance Redress Service (GRS), please visit http://www.worldbank.org/GRS. For information on how to submit complaints to the World Bank Inspection Panel, please visit www.inspectionpanel.org.



  • Annex 1: Results Framework and Monitoring

    kyrgyz republic: Sustainable Rural Water Supply and Sanitation Development Project


    Project Development Objective

    PDO Statement

    The project development objectives (PDO) are to assist the Kyrgyz Republic to (i) improve access to and quality of water supply and sanitation services in the Participating Rural Communities; and (ii) strengthen capacity of the Recipient's institutions in the water supply and sanitation sector.

    These results are at the:

    Project Level

    Project Development Objective Indicators













    Cumulative Target Values

    Frequency

    Data Source/ Methodology

    Responsibility for Data Collection

    Comments

    Indicator Name

    Core

    Unit of Measure

    Baseline

    YR1

    YR2

    YR3

    YR4

    YR5

    Number of people in rural areas provided with access to an improved water source under the project



    Number

    0

    0

    0

    26,500

    72,500

    100,000

    Semi-Annual

    Reports

    ARIS




    Number of people in project areas provided with access to improved sanitation facilities under the project.




    Number

    0

    0

    0

    3,000

    11,000

    16,000

    Semi-Annual

    Reports

    ARIS




    Operating Cost Coverage Ratio in project areas




    Ratio

    TBD

    -

    -

    0.50

    0.75

    >1.0

    Annual

    Reports

    ARIS




    Average hours of water supply per day in project areas




    Hours per day

    <12

    -

    -

    -

    16

    >18

    Semi-Annual

    Reports

    ARIS




    Institutional Support Plan for DDWSWD developed and approved




    Yes or No

    0

    -

    Draft

    Reviewed and

    Approved


    Yes

    Yes

    Semi-Annual

    Reports

    ARIS




    Intermediate Results Indicators













    Cumulative Target Values

    Frequency

    Data Source/ Methodology

    Responsibility for Data Collection

    Comment

    Indicator Name

    Core

    Unit of Measure

    Baseline

    YR1

    YR2

    YR3

    YR4

    YR5

    Component 1

    Direct project beneficiaries (percentage of whom are female)



    Number,

    Percentage



    0

    0

    0

    26,500

    (52%)


    72,500

    (52%)


    100,000

    (52%)


    Semi-Annual

    Reports

    ARIS




    New piped household water connections resulting from the project intervention



    Number

    0

    -

    -

    3,250

    8,900

    12,280

    Semi-Annual

    Reports

    ARIS




    Number of social institutions in project areas connected to the water supply network




    Number

    0

    -

    -

    20

    30

    46

    Semi-Annual

    Reports

    ARIS




    Number of service providers with signed agreements with SES Department




    Percentage

    0

    -

    -

    3

    9

    12

    Semi-Annual

    Reports

    ARIS




    Component 2

    Number of social institutions in project areas benefiting from improved sanitation facilities.




    Number

    0

    -

    -

    10

    20

    46

    Semi-Annual

    Reports

    ARIS




    Number of people trained to improve hygiene behavior and sanitation practices (% of whom are women)



    Number, percentage

    0

    -

    -

    8,000

    17,000

    26,250

    Semi-Annual

    Reports

    ARIS




    Preparation of standard designs and guidelines for on-site household sanitation




    Yes or No

    0

    -

    Draft

    Reviewed and

    Approved


    Yes

    -

    Annual

    Reports

    ARIS




    Component 3

    Number of service contracts signed




    Number

    0

    -

    3

    6

    9

    12

    Semi-Annual

    Reports

    ARIS




    Commercial Systems Operating in project areas




    Number

    0

    -

    -

    3

    6

    12

    Semi-Annual

    Reports

    ARIS




    Preparation of connection subsidy strategy in project areas




    Number

    0

    -

    3

    6

    9

    12

    Semi-Annual

    Reports

    ARIS




    Legal creation of aggregated water service provider (pilot)




    Yes or No

    0

    -

    Draft

    Reviewed and

    Approved


    Yes

    Yes

    Semi-Annual

    Reports

    ARIS




    Number of villages with updated information on the water supply and sanitation national data base




    Number

    0

    -

    200

    800

    1300

    1805

    Semi-Annual

    Reports

    ARIS




    Percentage of beneficiaries satisfied with the participatory process and level of engagement in the project.




    Percentage

    0

    -

    >60%

    >65%

    >70%

    >75%

    Annual

    Reports

    ARIS






    Explanatory Notes


    1. Number of people in rural areas provided with access to an improved water source under the project. This core sector indicator captures the cumulative number of people benefiting from access to new piped water supply system financed by the project. The project will support the installation of around 12,280 new connections to a household yard stand pipe, which will cover around 70 percent of project beneficiaries. The average household size is 5.7 persons (as per to recent data provided by the Ayil Okmotus). It is estimated, that remaining 30 percent of the project beneficiaries will receive water through a public standpipes to be installed in cases where it is not technically or economically viable to provide services through individual connections. Population estimates are based on figures provided by DDWSWD through official correspondence to the Bank, which makes reference to National Statistics Committee data, 2015.




    1. Number of people in rural areas provided with access to improved sanitation facilities under the project. This indicator captures the cumulative number of people benefiting from access to improved sanitation facilities in schools, kindergartens and other eligible social facilitates, financed under component 2 of the project.




    1. Operating Cost Coverage Ratio (OCCR). This PDO indicator relates to efficiency and financial sustainability of water services in project areas. It captures, outcomes related to the physical investments under component 1 and the institutional support activities, at the national and local level, financed under component 3 – and for this project it is a proxy indicator to measure strengthened capacity of sector institutions. Specifically, the indicator reflects the financial performance of the service provider as a ratio of total revenues and total operating expenses. The baseline values will be determined during year one of implementation and will be measured by the service providers, thereafter as part of their operating procedures. Average values will be reported to the Bank annually. To facilitate achievement of this indicator and ensure sustainability of investments, ARIS will enter in an agreement with the participating Ayil Okmotus at the early phases of implementation (prior to commencing works). This agreement will outline conditions for the Ayil Okmotus related to tariff increases, metering, billing and collection, and other necessary preconditions (including collection of connection fees from community members) to enable household connections to the new schemes.




    1. Average hours of water supply per day. This quality-of-service indicator tracks progress of outcomes associated with the infrastructure investments under component 1, including activities that focus on increasing production, improving network distribution, and reducing NRW. To a lesser extent it will also be influenced by institutional support activities implemented through component 3. Baseline values reflect actual hours of supply at the time of appraisal. These values are expected to increase throughout the project duration, as availability of water improves with support of project-financed investments.




    1. Institutional Support Plan for DDWSWD developed and approved. This indicator relates specifically to the objective of strengthening sector institutional capacity. It measures progress of the institutional support plan for DDWSWD with defined actions to support capacity improvement towards providing institutional support for sustainable water service delivery in rural areas.




    1. Direct project beneficiaries (percentage of whom are female). This core indicator reflects an estimate of the population that directly benefits from activities/interventions supported by the project. This will be recorded as a cumulative amount. Population estimates are based on figures provided by DDWSWD through official correspondence to the Bank, which makes reference to National Statistics Committee data, 2015. Data provided by Ayil Okmotus has been used to determine the proportion of beneficiaries that are female.




    1. New piped household water connections resulting from the project intervention. This intermediary indicator measures the number of new connections to be installed under the project – an important input into the estimate of project beneficiaries. The project will support the installation of around 12,280 new connections to a household yard stand pipe, which will cover around 70 percent of project beneficiaries.




    1. Number of social institutions in project areas connected to the water supply network. This intermediary indicator measures the number of schools, kindergartens, health clinics and other eligible social facilities, connected to the water supply network in the project areas.




    1. Number of service providers with signed agreements with SES Department. This intermediary indicator captures progress towards ensuring improved systems for water quality monitoring. As part of the quality assurance and operating procedures, water quality sampling and testing procedures will be introduced and agreements will be signed with SES Department for laboratory testing and certification.




    1. Number of social institutions in project areas benefiting from improved sanitation facilities. This intermediary indicator measures the number of schools, kindergartens, health clinics and other eligible social facilities, in which the project has supported upgrades and rehabilitation of the sanitation facilities.




    1. Number of people trained to improve hygiene behavior and sanitation practices (% of whom are women). This gender disaggregated indicator measures training outputs related to the sanitation and hygiene promotion and education activities, both at schools / kindergartens and within the project communities.




    1. Preparation of standard designs and guidelines for improved on-site household sanitation. This intermediary indicator tracks the progress of outputs related to preparation of standard designs, including guidelines for construction and operations, for household latrines and septic systems for rural areas, this together with related education and social mobilization programs (to stimulate demand), will facilitate private household investments for these facilities.




    1. Number of service contracts signed. This intermediary indicator tracks the progress of outputs related to institutional support activities provided under sub-component 3.1. Specifically, the project will also support the preparation of service contract agreements, to clarify and formalize respective responsibilities of the operator (CDWUUs) and asset owner (Ayil Okmotus) and to support governance of service performance, tariffs and financing mechanisms




    1. Commercial Systems Operating in project areas. This intermediary indicator tracks progress on the customization and installation of new commercial systems for each service provider. The commercial systems include activities that focus on billing and commercial management, customer-service policies and procedures, and citizen engagement and complaints handling/recourse mechanisms.




    1. Preparation of connection subsidy strategy in project areas. Component 3 activities will support the Ayil Okmotus and service providers, to develop a connection subsidy strategy and tariff mechanisms to address the needs of poorest and most vulnerable groups with the project areas. This intermediary indicator will track the progress of this important output.




    1. Legal creation of aggregated water service provider (pilot). As part of the institutional strengthening activities under component 3, the project will support the piloting of an aggregated service delivery model, which includes water service provision in more than one Ayil Okmotu. This activity is designed to enable more efficient and sustainable service delivery models. This intermediary indicator will track progress of this output.




    1. Number of villages with updated information on the water supply and sanitation national data base. The project will support augmentation and institutionalization of the sector management information system/data base, building upon the work carried out under RWSSP-2. This system will be used to strengthen sector monitoring, evidence based policy development and investment planning. This intermediary indicator will track progress of this output.




    1. Percentage of beneficiaries satisfied with the participatory process and level of engagement in the project. This indicator aims to report on the effectiveness of citizen engagement processes in the project. It will measure the level of satisfaction of project beneficiaries to the activities intended to engage them in project design, implementation and monitoring. The planned project surveys will be extended to obtain feedback from community members on their satisfaction with: (i) access to project information and awareness of decisions taken, (ii) their opportunities to provide feedback and participate in the dialogue, and (iii) the responsiveness of the implementing entity and Ayil Okmotus to feedback provided. These criteria will be rated on a 1-5 scale and will be equally weighted. ARIS will oversee this survey and report annually. Results will be gender disaggregated. Detailed mechanisms for collecting this data will be developed by ARIS, with support of the Bank, and included in the POM.


    Annex 2: Detailed Project Description

    kyrgyz republic: Sustainable Rural Water Supply and

    Sanitation Development Project


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