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Swayne D.E. (Ed.), 2013. Diseases of Poultry. 13th Edition. Wiley-Blackwell, USA.


  • Matin W.B. and I.D. Ait Isen, 2000. Diseases of Sheep, 3rd Ed. Blackwell Science, Oxford, UK.

  • Iqbal C.Z. and Akbar S.U.J., 2000. The Camel and its Diseases. Al Bayan Printing and Publishing Est. UAE.

  • Howard J.L, 1999. Current Veterinary Therapy, Food Animal Practice. W.B. Saunders, Co., U.S.A.

  • Rebhum, W.C., 1998. Diseases of Dairy Cattle, Williams and Willkins, Baltimore, USA.

  • Smith B.P., 1996. Large Animal Internal Medicine. 2nd Ed. The Mosby Co. Philadelphia U.S.A.

  • Hungerford. T.G., 1991, Hungerford’s Diseases of Livestock 9th Ed. McGraw-Hill Book Company, Sydney, Australia.

  • Larry P. Tilley and Francis W. K. Smith, Jr., 1997. The 5 Minutes Veterinary Consult Canine and Feline. William and Wilkins, M.D. USA.

  • Morgan, R.V., 1997. Handbook of Small Animal Practice. 3rd Ed. W.B. Saunders Company, PA, USA.


    ANAESTHESIOLOGY AND INTENSIVE CARE 1 (0-1)
    Learning outcomes:
    At the end of the course, the student will be able to:

    1. Describe different methods of general anaesthesia (injectable and inhalation).

    2. Describe different sites and techniques of regional and local anaesthesia.

    3. Monitor the surgical patient during intra and post-operative period.

    4. Practically demonstrate induction and maintenance of anaesthesia in clinical practice in different animals.


    Practical:

    Introduction to Veterinary Anaesthesia, including Pre-anaesthetics and Anaesthetic agents and their uses; Pre-anaesthetic considerations; Types of anaesthesia (local, regional and general), and their clinical applications; Epidural and Paravertebral anaesthesia and their practical demonstration; Local nerve blocks (for dental, eye and horn surgeries and their practical demonstration); Local nerve blocks in limbs for lameness diagnosis and their practical demonstration. Stages of General Anaesthesia and patient monitoring during and after anaesthesia; Anaesthesia under field conditions; Practical demonstration of anaesthetic regimens for small and large animals (including dogs, cats, small ruminants, horses, donkeys, large ruminants and camels); Anaesthetic regimens for birds, exotics, and laboratory animals; Anaesthetic emergencies (cardiac arrest, respiratory failure, shock, acid base imbalance) and their management.



    Recommended Books:

    1. Tranquilli, W. J., J. C. Thurmon and K. A. Grimn. 2007. Lumb and Jones’ Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia. 4th ed. Blackwell Publishing, USA.

    2. Aldridge, P. and L. O’Dwyer. 2013. Practical Emergency and Critical Care Veterinary Nursing. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., UK.

    3. Venugopalan, A. 2000. Essentials of Veterinary Surgery. 8th ed. Oxford, New Delhi.

    4. Harrari, J. 1996. Small Animal Surgery. Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore, USA.

    5. Thrall, D.E. 1994. Textbook of Veterinary Diagnostic Radiology. 2nd ed. W. B. Saunders Co., Philadelphia, USA.

    6. Turner, A. S. and C. W. Mcllwraith. 1989. Techniques in Large Animal Surgery. 2nd ed. Lea & Febiger Philadelphia, USA.

    7. Jennings. Jr. P. B. 1984. The Practice of Large Animal Surgery. W.B. Saunders Co., Philadelphia, USA.


    OBSTETRICS AND GENITAL DISEASES 3 (2-1)
    Learning outcomes:
    At the end of the course, students will be able to:


    1. Describe causes and management of fetal deaths in early and late gestation

    2. Describe causes of abortion

    3. Evaluate causes and management of pre- and post-partum disorders

    4. Describe the causes of infertility in animals


    Theory:

    Introduction and significance of obstetrics, Effect of climate on fertility, Effect of nutrition on fertility, Early embryonic mortality, Non-infectious causes of abortion, Infectious causes: bacterial, viral and protozoal diseases causing reproductive disorders in farm animals, Fetal mummification & maceration, Dropsy of fetal membranes & teratological defects, Uterine torsion, Genital prolapse, Causes and types of dystocia, Selection of obstetrical procedures, Diseases of puerperal period, Retention of fetal membranes, , Hormonal causes of infertility, Repeat Breeding, Anestrus, Uterine infections, Uterine cultures and treatment, Genetic and nutritional basis of infertility in male, Different types/forms of infertility in male, Principles of hormonal & antibiotic therapy, Small ruminants reproductive disorders, Equine reproductive disorders, Canine reproductive disorders.


    Practical:

    Overview of obstetrical anatomy, Normal/abnormal presentation, position and posture, Identification and usage of obstetrical instruments, Normal parturition mechanism in different species, Fetal and maternal dystocia: causes and treatment, Performance of mutation and forced extraction, Introduction and performance of fetotomy, Local, epidural and paravertebral anaesthesia, Caesarean section, Approach and handling of obstetrical cases, Induction of parturition and abortion in farm animals, Handling of prolapse and torsion, Prevention and treatment of infertility in male and female, Injuries/diseases of the puerperal period.


    Textbook:

    1. Roberts, S.J., 1986. Veterinary Obstetrics and Genital Diseases. 2nd Ed., Edwards Brothers, Inc., Ann. Arbor, Michigan, U.S.A


    Recommended Books:

    1. Morrow, D.A., 1986. Current Therapy in Theriogenology, II. W.B. Saunders Company, Philadelphia

    2. Youngquist, R.S. and W. Threlfall, 2007. Current Therapy in Large Animal Theriogenology. W.B. Saunders Company, Philadelphia


    COMMERCIAL POULTRY PRODUCTION 2 (1-1)
    Learning outcomes:
    At the end of the course, students will be able to:

    1. Describe modern managemental tools in different production systems and housing types.

    2. Describe different methods of processing of broiler meat.

    3. Demonstrate optimum production and management of layer chicken on the floor and in the cages.

    4. Perform disease prevention and control through proper implementation of biosecurity and vaccination procedures.

    5. Describe procedures required to maintain health and welfare of the birds.


    Theory:

    Present status and future scope of commercial poultry farming in Pakistan; characteristics of different breeds/strains involved in the development of broiler and layers; housing requirements for broiler and layer production; selection and procurement of quality chicks; pre-brooding and brooding requirements for broiler and layer chicks; feeding and management practices of broiler production; sex separate raising of broilers and measuring broiler growing efficiency; integrated broiler farming; processing of broilers chicken; factor affecting growth rate and meat quality in broiler production; vices and their remedies in layer production; light and feed manipulation to attain sexual maturity; management of layer flock during laying; layer management in cages; factors affecting egg production; production standards; management of the flock in hot and cold environment; induced molting and its economics; trouble shooting in commercial poultry farming; waste disposal; record keeping.


    Practical:

    Typical characteristics of poultry birds for meat production; demonstration of various types of brooders; sanitary practices on the farm; selection and culling of birds; pre-brooding and brooding management; selection and grading of live birds; litter management; feeding strategies for broiler; monitoring of growth performance of broilers viz. weekly feed consumption, weekly weight gain, mortality, feed to gain ratio and feed conversion ratio; processing techniques; carcass measurements and evaluating dressing percentage; giblet weights; sensory evaluation of broiler meat quality; biosecurity and its management; vaccination and vaccination schedule for common diseases; calculating economics of broiler production; debeaking, dubbing and toe clipping; identification of layer and non-layer; selection and culling procedures; catching and transportation of birds; cost benefit ratio of layer enterprises; induced molting techniques; managing flock during heat stress; use of computer in record keeping; visit to layer farm; feasibility report of broiler; feasibility report of 10,000 layer flock; record keeping.


    Textbook:

    1. North, M.O. and D.D. Bell. 2001. Commercial Chicken Production Manual. Van Nostrand Reinhold Co., New York, USA.


    Recommended Books:

    1. Ensminger, M.E., 1999. Poultry Science. The Interstate Printers and Publishers Inc., Danville, Illinois, U.S.A.

    2. Austic, R.E. and M.C. Nesheim, 1990. Poultry Production. Lea and Febiger, Philadelphia, U.S.A.

    3. Vegad, J.L., 2004. Poultry Diseases: A Guide for Farmers and Poultry Professionals. International Book Distributors Co. Lucknow, India.

    4. Hurd, L.M., 2003. Modern Poultry Farming. Greenworld Publishers 8/217, Indira Nagar Lucknow-226 016 (UP).

    5. Charles, T.B. and H.O. Stuart, 2011. Commercial Poultry Farming. 6th edition, Biotech Books, USA.

    6. Sreenivasaiah, P.V., 2006. Scientific Poultry Production. 3rd edition. International Book Distributing Co., UP India.

    7. Haq, A. and M. Akhtar, 2004. Poultry Farming. Higher Education Commission, H-9, Islamabad, Pakistan.

    8. Jadhav, N.V. and M.F. Siddiqi, 1999. Handbook of Poultry Production and Management. Jaypee Brothers, Medical Publishers (P) Ltd. New Delhi, India.


    BIO-STATISTICS 3 (2-1)
    Learning outcomes:
    At the end of the course, students will be able to:

    1. Define bio-statistics and describe its applications

    2. Differentiate between continuous and discrete data

    3. Define and explain probability, correlation, regression and salient statistical concepts

    4. Perform statistical analysis pivotal to bio-statistics


    Theory:

    Introduction of bio-statistics, types of data (scales of measurements), frequency distribution for continuous and discrete data, visual representation of data, stem and leaf display, box and whisker plots; measures of location and variability, moments, skewness, coefficient of skewness and Kurtosis, definitions and laws of probability, simple correlation and regression analysis, elementary ideas of sampling, distribution of means and proportions, Test of significance of means, proportion, difference between means and difference between proportions with their confidence Intervals. Experimental Design (Completely Randomized Design, Randomized Complete Block Design).


    Practical:

    The statistical packages Minitab and SPSS will be used for Measure of Location, Measure of Dispersion, Graphical Presentation, Regression and Correlation Analysis, Test of significance of Means, Proportion, Differentiate between Two Means, Proportions, CR Design and RCB Design.


    Textbook:

    1. Zar, J.H., 2003. Biostatistical Analysis, Fourth Edition, Pearson Education (Singapore) Prentice Hall International (UK) Limited. London, UK.


    Recommended Books:

    1. Muhammad F., 2000. Statistical Methods and Data Analysis, Kitab Markaz, Bhawana Bazar Faisalabad, Pakistan.

    2. Choudhry, M. R., 2001. Modern Statistics (Vol-I & II ). Polymer Publications, Urdu Bazaar, Lahore.

    3. Steel, R. G. D, J. H. Torrie and D.A. Dickey, 1997. Principles and Procedures of Statistics: A Biometrical Approach. 3rd Edition. WCB McGraw-Hill, New York, USA.



    MEDICINE CLINIC-II 1 (0-1)
    Learning outcomes:
    At the end of the course, students will be able to:

    1. Perform disease diagnosis and treatment of clinical cases of hepatobiliary, nervous, urinary and integumentary systems of large and small animals.

    2. Collect samples of body fluid and tissues.

    3. Demonstrate knowledge and skills in the interpretation of common diagnostic procedures and Lab reports.

    4. Describe role of vaccination in diseases control and general vaccination schedule for different animal species.

    5. Interact with community through small scale project development.

    6. Develop of core competencies in clinical case handling and recording.


    Clinic:

    Exercises in diagnosis and treatment of clinical cases of diseases of hepatobiliary system, nervous system; urinary system, integumentary system in livestock and pets; Practice of sample collection, labeling, packaging and dispatch of biological materials (blood, serum, feces, skin scrapings, milk and other body fluids) for laboratory examination, Hematological evaluation and interpretation, Evaluation of acid-base balance and interpretation, Fecal examination procedures and interpretations, Examination of skin scrapings and interpretation, Urine evaluation procedures and interpretation, Tests and their interpretation for hemoprotozoan diseases, Interpretation of blood chemistry profile in diseases, Paracentesis and interpretation of test results, Milk tests for mastitis and interpretation, Vaccines and vaccination in ruminants, equines and pets, Preparing and implementing projects for community development, Recording of minimum 15 cases under the supervision of teacher and making a presentation after consulting veterinary information resources like journals, books and internet. Study tours to livestock farms and Veterinary Hospitals.


    Recommended Books:

    1. Radostitis, O.M., C.C. Gay, K.W. Hincheliff and P. D. Constable, 2007. Veterinary Medicine, 10th Ed. Saunders Elsevier, PA, USA.

    2. Kelly, W. R., 1984. Veterinary Clinical Diagnosis. 3rd Ed. Bailliere Tindall and Corsell, London, UK.

    3. Kahn C.M., 2010. The Merck Veterinary Manual. 10th Ed. Merch & Company., INC, Whitehouse Station, N.J., USA.

    4. Pinsent, P.J.N. and C.J. Fulle, 1997. Outline of Clinical Diagnosis in Horse. Blackwell Science, Oxford, UK.

    5. Howard J.L, 1999. Current Veterinary Therapy, Food Animal Practice. W.B. Saunders, Co., U.S.A.

    6. Hungerford. T.G., 1991, Hungerford’s Diseases of Livestock 9th Ed. McGraw-Hill Book Company, Sydney, Australia.

    7. Smith B.P., 1990. Large Animal Internal Medicine. The C.V. Mosby Company, Baltimore.


    SURGERY CLINIC-II 1 (0-1)
    Learning outcomes:
    At the end of the course, students will be able to:

    1. Perform different techniques for handling of animals for examination and treatment purposes

    2. Protect themselves and the animals from serious injuries.

    3. Perform different surgical exercises on clinical cases.

    4. Perform management during post-operative period.


    Clinic:

    Physical and chemical restraint techniques in horses, ruminants, pets, history taking and clinical examination, routes of drug administration and catheterization in male and female animals, Bandages and bandaging techniques, Preparations used for topical dressing of wounds, management of wounds, galls, ulcers and abscesses, Trocarization in small and large animals, Hospitalization and care of sick animals. Students will be required to record a minimum of 10 cases (history taking, clinical findings, laboratory investigation, diagnosis, differential diagnosis treatment and discussion) in each clinical case under the supervision of a teacher.


    Recommended Books:

    1. Venugopalan, A. 2000. Essentials of Veterinary Surgery. 8th Ed. Oxford and IBH Publishers and Distributors, New Delhi, India.

    2. Kumar, A. 1997. Veterinary Surgical Techniques. Vikas Publishing House, New Delhi, India.

    3. Harari, J., 1993. Surgical Complications and Wound Healing in the Small Animal Practice, W. B. Saunders Co., Philadelphia, USA.

    4. Kelly, W. R. 1984. Veterinary Clinical Diagnosis. 3rd Ed. Bailliere Tindall, London, UK.


    THERIOGENOLOGY CLINIC - II 1 (0-1)
    Learning outcomes:
    At the end of the course, students will be able to:

    1. Describe the importance of breeding bull, its selection and clinical evaluation.

    2. Basics for semen collection, evaluation and processing.


    Clinic:

    Method and importance of history questions in case handling, Breeding program in a herd, How to diagnose pregnancy in domestic animals, Breeding soundness examination of male, Preparation of Bull and Artificial Vagina for semen collection, Methods of semen collection (Techniques), Evaluation of semen (characters) and processing (storage methods), Preparation of extenders, Rectal palpation and passing of rod for Artificial Insemination.


    Recommended Books:

    1. Zemjenis, R., 1970. Diagnostic & Therapeutic Techniques in Animal Reproduction. Williams & Wilkins Company, Baltimore

    2. Morrow, D.A., 1986. Current Therapy in Theriogenology, II. W.B. Saunders Company, Philadelphia

    3. Ahmad, M. and M.A. Saji, 1997. Manual for Breeding Soundness of Dairy Bulls for use in A.I. Livestock and Dairy development Department, 16-Cooper Road, Lahore.


    SEMESTER VIII
    BREEDER AND HATCHERY MANAGEMENT 3 (2-1)
    Learning outcomes:
    At the end of the course, students will be able to:

    1. Describe modern managemental techniques for optimum and cost-effective production of broiler and layer breeder.

    2. Describe techniques for optimum production, selection, fumigation of storage of hatching eggs.

    3. Ensure disease prevention and control through proper implementation of biosecurity and vaccination procedures.

    4. Describe procedures involved in production of good quality chicks

    5. Demonstrate maintenance of health and welfare of the breeding birds.

    6. Plan, implement, and manage optimum and hygienic hatchery operations.

    7. Perform chick sexing, grading, vaccination, packing practices in the hatchery.

    8. Handle problems in the breeding poultry and hatchery operations.


    Theory:

    Status and scope of Poultry Breeding Industry in Pakistan/World; commercial breeding programs; bio-security; breeder house layout and equipment requirements; environment control vs. open sided housing; care and management during brooding period; light and feed management during growing; monitoring body weights and uniformity during growing; grading and selection during growing period; significance of fleshing, feathering, shank and keel length; transportation or shifting of growing flock to breeding house; pre-breeder nutrition; feeding programs for adults; production standards; male management during rear and production; causes of poor fertility and hatchability; major management health concerns with breeders; summer and winter strategies to enhance production; induced molting in the breeder flocks; incubation methods; types of incubators; role of computer in modern hatchery operations; incubation requirements; embryonic development of chick; factors influencing fertility, hatchability and quality of chicks; setting and candling of eggs; taking off the hatch; hatchery sanitation and waste disposal; hazard management during incubation; incubation records; trouble shooting at different stages in the breeder and hatchery operation.


    Practical:

    Demonstration of commercial breeding programs; reproductive systems of male and female; vaccination programs and methods; blood and tissue sampling; environment control housing; ventilation and heating systems; toe clipping, dubbing and beak trimming; monitoring body weights during growing and uniformity calculations; basic practices for male management; identification of sexing errors; separate-sex feeding system; male to female ratio; artificial insemination; nest management; egg collection, handling, cleaning; hatching egg fumigation, selection, storage and transportation; summer and winter management; calculating cost of producing hatching eggs and chicks; calculations and conversions; feasibility report of 10,000 broiler and layer breeder flocks; Layout and design of hatcheries; selection, candling and setting of hatching eggs; cleaning of hatching eggs; fumigation; types of incubators and their different parts; operation of incubators; sexing, vaccination, grading; packing and transportation of day-old chicks; hatchery sanitation; disinfection and fumigation of incubators; visits to commercial hatcheries; record keeping; feasibility report of hatchery.


    Textbook:

    1. North, M.O. and D. D. Bell, 2001. Commercial Chicken Production Manual. Van Nostrand Reinhold Co., New York, USA.

    Recommended Books:

    1. Taylor, L.W., 2003. Fertility and Hatchability of Chicken and Turkey Egg. International book distributing company, Lucknow, India.

    2. Lakhotia, R. L., 2003. Reproduction in Poultry. CAB International, Wallingford, Oxon, U.K.

    3. Hocking, P. M., 2009. Biology of breeding poultry. CAB International, Wallingford, Oxon, U.K.

    4. Austic and Nesheim, 1990. Poultry Production.13th edition. Lea and Febiger; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

    5. Leeson, S. and J.D. Summers, 2000. Broiler Breeder Production. University Book Foundation, University of Guleph, Canada.

    6. Leeson, S. and J.D. Summers, 2001. Nutrition of the Chicken. International Book Distributing C., Lucknow, India.

    7. Sreenivasaiah, P.V., 2006. Scientific Poultry Production. 3rd edition. International Book Distributing Co., UP India.


    VETERINARY EPIDEMIOLOGY AND PUBLIC HEALTH 3 (2-1)
    Learning outcomes:
    At the end of the course, students will be able to:

    1. Describe basic principles of epidemiology, including descriptive/analytical epidemiology

    2. Elaborate techniques used to conduct disease outbreak investigations and develop disease prevention programs

    3. Describe causal models, distribution/patterns and control of disease or other health-related events in populations.

    4. Perform epidemiologic data collection, management and analysis, evaluation of analyses and critical evaluation of published information.

    Theory:

    Introduction to epidemiology & public health, disease occurrence, Mapping, Causality, Determinants of disease, Diagnostic testing, Transmission and maintenance of infection, Descriptive epidemiology, Analytical epidemiology, Case-control studies, Cohort studies, Experimental epidemiology, Animal disease survey, Types of sampling, Surveillance, Prevention, Control and eradication, Outbreak investigation, National and international disease reporting, Trans-boundary disease of veterinary importance, TAD distribution, mapping, regulatory implications, TAD control, International trade framework


    Practical:

    Nature of veterinary data scale of measurement, Data elements, Representation of data: coding numeric codes, symbols, Presentation of numerical data, Measure of disease occurrence, Vital statistics, Collection, handling and transportation of appropriate samples, Methods of data collection, Survey and sample size calculation, Questionnaire development for field visit, Field visit for detection of weather determinants, global positioning system (GPS) and GIS Arc for mapping of important communicable diseases, entry of data collected during survey and its analysis, Epidemic investigation steps, Questionnaire for epidemic investigation of retrospective, cohort and prospective studies.



    Textbook:

    1. Thrusfield M., 2007. Veterinary Epidemiology. Blackwell Publisher


    Recommended Books:

    1. Gordis L., 2008. Epidemiology. 4th Edition. Saundeis, Elsevier

    2. Bonita, R., R. Beagleohole, T. KjellStrom, 2006. Basic Epidemiology. 2nd Edition. WHO

    3. Merrill, R. M., 2013. Introduction to epidemiology, 6th Edition. Jones and Barletta learning LLC.


    SMALL ANIMAL SURGERY 4 (3-1)
    Learning outcomes:
    At the end of the course, students will be able to:

    1. Correct surgical problems encountered in small animal practice

    2. Practice the learned techniques on experimental and clinical cases.


    Theory:

    General surgical considerations, Fluid and electrolyte therapy in small animals, Affections of mouth & teeth, salivary glands, neck, digestive system, Hip and Shoulder Dislocations, Fracture, Affections of respiratory system, skin and its adnexa, ears, urinary system, Male and female genital systems.


    Practical:

    Laparotomy techniques in small animals, Tooth extraction procedure, salivary gland resection, Splenectomy, Gastrotomy, Intestinal end-to-end anastomosis, Castration in dog and cat, Ovariohysterectomy in bitches and queens, Cystotomy, Nephrotomy and Nephrectomy, Thoracotomy, correction of auricular haematoma, ear cropping, Tail docking and Dewclaw amputation, repair of prolapse of eye ball, Approaches to different long bones and use of external and internal fixation devices for fracture repair, Anal sac resection.


    Textbook:

    1. Slatter, D. H. (ed.) 1991. Textbook of Small Animal Surgery. 2nd ed. W. B. Saunders Co., Philadelphia, USA.


    Recommended Books:

    1. Bojrab, M. J. (ed.) 1998. Current Techniques in Small Animal Surgery. 4th Ed. Lea and Febiger, Philadelphia, USA.

    2. Fossum, T. W. (ed.) 1997. Small Animal Surgery. 3rd ed. Mosby-Year Book, Inc., St. Louis, Missouri, USA.

    3. Harvey, C. E., C. D. Newton and A. Schwartz, 1990. Small Animal Surgery. J. B. Lippincott. Philadelphia, USA.

    4. Knecht, C. D., A. R. Allen, D. J. Williams and J. H. Johnson, 1987. Fundamental Techniques in Veterinary Surgery. 3rd Ed. W. B. Saunders Co., Philadelphia. USA.


    5. Piermattei, D. L., 1993. An Atlas of Surgical Approaches to the Bones and Joints of the Dog and Cat. 3rd Ed. W. B. Saunders Co., Philadelphia, USA.

    6. Archibald, J. (ed.) 1974. Canine Surgery. 2nd Ed. Santa Barbara, American Veterinary Publications, Inc., California, USA.

    FISHERIES AND AQUACULTURE 1 (0-1)
    Learning outcomes:
    At the end of the course, students will be able to:

    1. Differentiate between fish, fisheries & aquaculture.

    2. Identify fish species on the basis of morphology.

    3. Apply principles of aquaculture for appropriate site selection, designing and pond construction; selection of suitable fish species for sustainable aquaculture.

    4. Apply best aquaculture operational and management skills.

    5. Formulate and prepare aqua feed, induced breeding techniques, diagnosis and control of diseases in commercially important fish species.


    Practical:

    Introduction to fish, fisheries and aquaculture; fish diversity, source and consumers preference; fish identification, morphometric and meristic counts, dissection, anatomy and dressing percentage; construction and components of fish ponds; determination of water quality parameters (physical, chemical and biological-phytoplankton and zooplankton sampling and identification); diagnosis and control of infectious and metabolic fish diseases; formulation and preparation of aqua feed; types of fish hatchery and management; induced fish breeding techniques; ornamental fishes and aquarium making; fishing gears and netting.


    Textbook:

    1. Garg, S. K., A. Bhatnagar, A. Kalla and M.S. Johal, 2002. Experimental Icthyology. CBS Publishers. INDIA.


    Recommended Books:

    1. Mirza, M. R. and M. Sharif, 1998. Key to the Identification of Fishes of Punjab. Ilmi Publications, Lahore.

    2. Ali, S. S., 2001. Fresh Water Fish Biology. Naseem Book Depot, Hyderabad.

    3. Shammi, Q. J. and S. Bhatnager, 2002. Applied Fisheries. Agrobios. India.

    4. Pillay, T.V.R., 2002. Aquaculture: Principles and Practices. Blackwell Science Ltd.

    5. Bhatti, M. N. and M.R. Mirza, 1995. Jadeed Fish Culture. Feroze Sons, Lahore.

    6. Bhatti, M. N. and M.R. Mirza, 1993. Pakistan Ki Machlianaur Mahiparwari. Feroze Sons, Lahore.


    MEDICINE CLINIC-III 2 (0-2)
    Learning outcomes:
    At the end of the course, students will be able to:

    1. Perform disease diagnosis and treatment of clinical cases of musculoskeletal system, eye and ear of large and small animals.

    2. Practice emergency handling and critical care of patient in ICU and demonstrate basic skills of diseases outbreak investigation.

    3. Use alternative medicine in veterinary practice.

    4. Describe principles of storage of dangerous drugs and development of strategies for parasite control in livestock.

    5. Demonstrate basic knowledge of diseases diagnosis, treatment and control of zoo and wild animal diseases.

    6. Develop core competencies in clinical case handling and recording.


    Clinic:

    Exercises in diagnosis and treatment of clinical cases of diseases of musculoskeletal system, eye and ear; Practice of emergency handling and critical care (colic, tympany, snakebite, poisonings, drug reactions, hemorrhage, shock, heat stroke etc.), Managing of an outbreak of infectious/contagious disease, Application of different diagnostic and treatment tools (gastric lavage, enema, allergic tests etc.), Screening tests for brucellosis, Health and safety (human, animal, environment), Maintenance and storage of dangerous/poisonous drugs, Practical demonstration of the control measures of ecto- and endo-parasites on individual animals and herd basis, Introduction to the practice of complementary medicine (alternative medicine), Use of biotechnology in disease diagnosis, treatment, control and prevention, Introduction to important diseases of zoo/wild animal species, Recording of minimum 15 cases under the supervision of teacher and making a presentation after consulting veterinary information resources like journals, books and internet. Study tour to livestock farms, Zoo/Wildlife Parks and Veterinary Hospitals.


    Recommended Books:

    1. Radostitis, O.M., C.C. Gay, K.W. Hincheliff and P. D. Constable, 2007. Veterinary Medicine, 10th Ed. Saunders Elsevier, PA, USA.

    2. Kelly, W. R., 1984. Veterinary Clinical Diagnosis. 3rd Ed. Bailliere Tindall & Corsell, London, U. K.

    3. Kahn C.M., 2010. The Merck Veterinary Manual. 10th Ed. Merch & Company., INC, Whitehouse Station, N.J., USA.

    4. Pinsent, P.J.N. and C.J. Fulle, 1997. Outline of Clinical Diagnosis in Horse. Blackwell Science, Oxford, UK.

    5. Howard J.L, 1999. Current Veterinary Therapy, Food Animal Practice. W.B. Saunders, Co., U.S.A.

    6. Hungerford. T.G., 1991, Hungerford’s Diseases of Livestock 9th Ed. McGraw-Hill Book Company, Sydney, Australia.

    7. Smith B.P., 1990. Large Animal Internal Medicine. The C.V. Mosby Company, Baltimore.



    SURGERY CLINIC-III 2 (0-2)
    Learning outcomes:
    At the end of the course, students will be able to:

    1. Control and handle different animals for the purpose of surgical manipulations.

    2. Manage treatment of animals brought to the Surgery clinic.

    3. Prepare animals for surgical operations.

    4. Manage pre-operative and post-operative requirements of individual patients.

    5. Manage and feed admitted cases.


    Clinic:

    Management and treatment of burn wounds, Antibiotics, Analgesics, Anti-inflammatory drugs used in surgery, Lameness in large animals, Nerve block, regional and local anaesthesia in clinical cases, Use of firing and counter irritants in veterinary practices, Induction and maintenance of general anaesthesia in field conditions, Surgical management of horn, hoof and tail affections, Teat surgery (instruments, techniques and complications), Castration of large animals, Visits to animal farms and hospitals.


    Recommended Books:

    1. Crow, S. E. and S. O. Walshaw, 1997. Manual of Clinical Procedures in the Dog, Cat and Rabbit. 2nd Ed. J. B. Lippincott, Philadelphia, USA.

    2. Kelly, W. R. 1984. Veterinary Clinical Diagnosis. 3rd Ed. Bailliere Tindall, London, UK.

    3. Kirk, R. W., S. I. Bistner and R. B. Ford, 1985. Kirk and Bisner's Handbook of Veterinary Procedures and Emergency Treatment. 6th Ed. W.B. Saunders Co., Philadelphia, USA.

    4. Oehme, F.W. and I. E. Prier, 1998. Text book of Large Animal Surgery. 2nd Ed. Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore, London, UK.



    THERIOGENOLOGY CLINIC - III 2 (0-2)
    Learning outcomes:
    At the end of the course, students will be able to:

    1. Explain the procedures of Artificial Insemination and their application.

    2. Elaborate the use of ultrasonography in reproductive management.

    3. Describe and demonstrate; how to handle reproductive disorders.


    Clinic:

    Approaches to diagnose and record reproductive disorders in clinical cases, Different methods of artificial insemination (AI) in domestic animals, Semen handling and structure of liquid nitrogen container, Thawing of frozen semen, Preparation of AI gun, Pre-requisites for AI procedure, Determination of time of insemination, Method of AI rod & AI gun passing in the female reproductive tract on table and in live animals, Clinical application of hormones in different reproductive disorders, Ultrasonography in domestic animals, Synchronization for reproductive management in domestic animals, Causes and management of repeat breeding, Diagnosis causes of anestrus, prolapse and its management, Uterine sample collection for culture sensitivity and endometrial biopsy, Diagnosis and prevention of abortion.


    Recommended Books:

    1. Zemjenis, R., 1970. Diagnostic & Therapeutic Techniques in Animal Reproduction. Williams & Wilkins Company, Baltimore

    2. Morrow, D.A., 1986. Current Therapy in Theriogenology, II. W.B. Saunders Company, Philadelphia

    3. Kahn, W., D. Wolkmann, and R.M. Kenney, 1994. Veterinary Reproductive Ultrasonography, Mosby-Wolfe, London



    SEMESTER IX
    ANIMAL WELFARE AND ETHICS 2 (2-0)
    Learning outcomes:
    At the end of the course, students will be able to:

    1. Enumerate international and national organizations working for animal welfare

    2. Describe challenges of captive animals

    3. Elaborate regulations, policies and principles governing care and use of laboratory animals

    4. Describe various hazards affecting welfare of animals


    Theory:

    Care and welfare of different animal species, National / Provincial Legislation for Animal Welfare, Regulations, policies and principles governing the care and use of animals, Code of practice for domestic poultry, farm, captive, laboratory and companion animals, Hazards (Natural and Man-made) affecting the welfare of animals and their management, Difference between hazard and disaster, Ethics, Animal Welfare Organizations like Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA), Challenges to Zoo and animal welfare, Setting Standards for Evaluating of captive Facilities.


    Textbook:

    1. Fraser, D., 2008. Understanding Animal Welfare: The Science in its Cultural Context. ISBN: 978-1-4051-3695-2 Wiley-Blackwell.
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