Health of the Health Workforce 2015



Download 0.56 Mb.
Page9/9
Date29.01.2017
Size0.56 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9

Medical workforce


Prospects are particularly good for:

GPs, especially in rural areas

clinical genetics

pain medicine

Palliative care

psychiatry

sexual health medicine.
In general, the specialties with poorer job prospects are those that currently have higher ratios of postgraduate trainee doctors to senior staff.
However, this does not hold true for specialties that have a shortage of senior staff, such as general practice and urgent care, for which job prospects for trainees are excellent.
See Appendix 2 for a graph showing ratios of trainees to senior doctors for all specialties, including GPs.

Nursing


Prospects are particularly good for advanced practice in areas including:

cancer care

long-term condition management

aged care

diabetes.
In recent years not all nursing graduates have found employment immediately, but workforce planning indicates New Zealand will need to train more nurses by 2017, when retirement among the ageing workforce will become a critical factor.

Midwifery


Opportunities are available, particularly in rural areas.

Allied health


Prospects are good for:

sonographers

psychologists

dental hygienists

dental therapists

MRI technicians

medical physicists.
Prospects are stable for:

medical laboratory scientists

occupational therapists

pharmacists


Prospects may be limited for dietitians.

Kaiāwhina (non-regulated)


Demand for carers and support workers will continue to rise as the population ages and the trend for care to move out of hospitals and closer to people’s homes continues. For a list of nonregulated health occupations, see Appendix 5.

References


BERL Economics. 2014. Health and Disability Kaiāwhina Worker Workforce 2013 Profile for Careerforce. Wellington: Business and Economic Research Ltd.

Kyle M, Aileone L. 2013. Mapping the Rural Midwifery Workforce in New Zealand. Christchurch: Midwifery and Maternity Provider Organisation.

Midwifery Council of New Zealand. 2010. Midwifery Workforce Report 2009. Wellington: Midwifery Council of New Zealand.

Ministerial Task Group on Clinical Leadership. 2009. In Good Hands: Transforming clinical governance in New Zealand. Wellington.

Ministry of Health. 2009. Our Oral Health. Wellington: Ministry of Health.

OECD. 2013. Health at a Glance 2013: OECD indicators. OECD Publishing.

Pacific Perspectives. 2013. Pacific Workforce Service Forecast for HWNZ. Wellington: Pacific Perspectives.

Appendix 1: List of responsible authorities and professions regulated


Responsible authority

Profession

New Zealand Chiropractic Board

Chiropractic

Dental Council of New Zealand

Dentistry

Dental hygiene

Clinical dental technology

Dental technology

Dental therapy


Dietitians Board

Dietetics

Medical Sciences Council of New Zealand

Medical laboratory science

Anaesthetic technology



Medical Radiation Technologists Board

Medical radiation technology

Medical Council

Medicine

Midwifery Council

Midwifery

Nursing Council

Nursing

Occupational Therapy Board

Occupational therapy

Optometrists and Dispensing Opticians Board

Optometry

Optical dispensing



Osteopathic Council

Osteopathy

Pharmacy Council

Pharmacy

Physiotherapy Board

Physiotherapy

Podiatrists Board

Podiatry

Psychologists Board

Psychology

Psychotherapists Board

Psychotherapy



Appendix 2: Ratios of trainee doctors to specialists


In general, specialties with ratios closest to zero and/or in which senior medical officers have an average age of 50+ years are the most vulnerable to future shortages of senior staff, and therefore represent the best job prospects.

Notes


The number and average age of SMOs by vocational registration were provided by MCNZ, as of 30 June 2015.

The number of trainees for musculoskeletal medicine (no current trainees, 20 SMOs) was provided by the New Zealand Association of Musculoskeletal Medicine, July 2015.

The number of trainees in general practice, medical administration, occupational medicine, public health medicine, sports medicine and urgent care was provided by their representative medical colleges, February–July 2015.

The number of trainees in family planning was calculated by using the number undertaking the Clinical Diploma in Sexual and Reproductive Health, July 2015.

The number of trainees in cardiothoracic surgery, general surgery, neurosurgery, orthopaedic surgery, otolaryngology, paediatric surgery, plastic surgery, urology and vascular surgery was provided by the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, September 2015.

The number of trainees in all other specialties was provided by DHBs (RMO workforce profile data collection), March 2015.


Appendix 3: Number of nurses per 100,000 population


This table is based on the number of annual practising certificates issued by the Nursing Council of New Zealand as of 31 March 2015, and the 2015 population from Statistics New Zealand’s population projection, which is based on the 2013 Census, 2014 update. These numbers indicate a head count of nurses rather than the numbers of FTEs.


DHB

Enrolled nurses

Nurse practitioners

Registered nurses

Northland

72

4

1009

Waitemata

24

2

558

Auckland

42

5

1522

Counties Manukau

26

1

563

Waikato

51

4

1031

Lakes

47

2

922

Bay of Plenty

53

4

1013

Tairāwhiti

67

2

1052

Hawke’s Bay

61

6

1061

Taranaki

66

4

974

MidCentral

73

9

1052

Whanganui

64

2

997

Capital & Coast

33

1

1187

Hutt

35

3

805

Wairarapa

103

5

927

Nelson Marlborough

53

1

1010

West Coast

235

3

1114

Canterbury

94

2

1111

South Canterbury

107

5

968

Southern

112

4

1016

Average across all DHB regions

61

3

1087



Appendix 4: List of allied health, science and technical professionals


Below is a list of most of the professions generally regarded as allied health (including science and technical) professions. Some are regulated under the HPCA Act, as indicated with an asterisk.


Anaesthetic technicians*

Audiologists

Biomedical engineers and electronic technicians

Cardiac sonographers*

Chiropractors*

Clinical dental technicians*

Clinical perfusionists

Clinical physiologists – dialysis (renal dialysis technicians)

Clinical physiologists – respiratory

Clinical physiologists and technicians – cardiac

Clinical physiologists and technicians – sleep

Counsellors

Cytogeneticists

Dental assistants

Dental hygienists*

Dental technicians*

Dental therapists*

Dietitians*

Dispensing opticians*

Diversional therapists

Drug and addiction counsellors

Exercise physiologists

Family and marriage counsellors

Gastroenterology scientists and technicians

Genetic associates

Hospital play specialists

Magnetic resonance imaging technologists*

Massage therapists

Medical imaging (or radiation) technologists*


Medical laboratory scientists*

Medical laboratory technicians*

Medical photographers

Medical physicists

Music therapists

Neurophysiology scientists

Neurophysiology technicians

Nuclear medicine technologists*

Occupational therapists*

Optometrists*

Orthoptists

Orthotists and prosthestists

Osteopaths*

Paramedics

Pharmacists*

Pharmacy technicians

Physiotherapists*

Podiatrists*

Psychologists* (clinical, educational, child and family, counselling, health and neuropsychologists)

Psychotherapists*

Radiation therapists*

Rehabilitation counsellors

Social workers30

Sonographers*

Speech and language therapists

Sterile service technicians

Traditional Chinese medicine practitioners

Vision and hearing technicians

Visiting neurodevelopmental therapists




Appendix 5: List of kaiāwhina (non-regulated) roles


This list comprises the non-regulated occupations regarded as part of the kaiāwhina workforce.

Non-regulated professional, support and carer roles


Child or youth residential care assistants

Community health workers

Community health workers – public health

Disabilities services officers

Diversional therapists

Family support workers

Health care assistants

Health diagnostic and promotion professionals

Health promotion officers

Home and community based support workers for disabled, older or injured people

Hospital orderlies

Kaiāwhina hauora (Māori health assistants)

Navigators

Nursing support workers

Peer support workers

Personal care assistants

Public health workers

Rehabilitation assistants

Residential care officers

Sterile service technicians

Support workers in residential facilities

Therapy assistants

Traditional Māori health practitioners

Vision and hearing technicians

Whānau Ora workers

Appendix 6: HWNZ current priorities


We work with key occupational groups and stakeholders to aim for the best possible outcomes by encouraging a strategic national approach to addressing the challenges facing the workforce. We look for ways to develop joined-up mutually owned solutions for the challenges our sector faces in the following key work areas.


Advanced trainee fellowship

Anaesthesia workforce strategy

Audiologists and audiometrists

Clinical rehabilitation education

Community-based attachments

Dermatology

Disability support services

Endoscopy nursing

Gastroenterologists

GP training

Health Practitioners (Replacement of Statutory References to Medical Practitioners) Bill

Health workforce data modelling

HPCA Amendment Bill

HPI improvement project

Implementation of Allied Health Educational Framework

Investment strategy

The Kaiāwhina Action Plan

Māori health

Medical specialty − career guidance factsheets

Mental health and addictions (MHA) workforce development



NETP programmes

Nurse practitioners

Optometrists and ophthalmologists

Pacific health

Pain medicine workforce strategy

Palliative care strategy

Pathology workforce strategy

Pharmacy accuracy checking technician

Pharmacy workforce development

Postgraduate midwifery education

Prescribing regulations

Progress applications for regulation under HPCA Act

Redesign medical and allied health contracts

Regularisation of the workforce

Rural health workforce development

Rural midwifery

Sonography

Specialist nursing and nurse prescribing

Strengthened midwifery first year of practice (MFYP)

Voluntary bonding






1 Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development

2 These figures are DHB clinical staffing numbers and are available at www.health.govt.nz. The employed FTE methodology is based on contracted hours, in which one FTE is a person working 40 hours a week or more, not headcount. However if a person works less than 40 hours per week the proportion of hours worked will be counted (eg, 30 hours is 0.75 FTE).

3 Annual practising certificates to legally work in New Zealand as of mid-2015 and mid-2009.

4 MCNZ workforce surveys, 2009 and 2013.

5 MCNZ workforce surveys, 2009 and 2013.

6 Medical graduates typically in their first or second year of work in a hospital.

7 Hospital positions for doctors in at least their third postgraduate year.

8 MCNZ workforce survey 2014, and Statistics New Zealand population projection based on the 2013 Census.

9 MCNZ registration by specialty for annual practising certificates mid-2009 to mid-2015. Note: this information relates to the number of doctors.

10 MCNZ registration for annual practising certificates, mid-2009 to mid-2015.

11 Dental Council of New Zealand annual report (provisional data).

12 Dental Council of New Zealand annual report (provisional data).

13 Statistics New Zealand population projection based on 2013 Census; 2014 update.

14 Dental Council of New Zealand workforce analysis 2010: reporting period dentists October 2010 to September 2011.

15 NCNZ end of year statistics as at 31 March 2015.

16 NCNZ annual reports 2009, 2011.

17 NCNZ end of year statistics as at 31 March 2015.

18 Statistics New Zealand population projection based on 2013 Census; 2014 update.

19 NCNZ end of year statistics as at 31 March 2015.

20 Nursing advanced choice of employment data, 2013 and 2014.

21 These scholarships are funded through the Ministry’s Very Low Cost Access scheme.

22 Statistics New Zealand population projection based on 2013 Census; 2014 update: females aged between 15 and 44.

23 Statistics New Zealand birth registration births, deaths, and selected rates, revised December 2014.

24 Lead maternity carers provide maternity care and support throughout pregnancy, labour and the first weeks of a baby’s life. Most are midwives, but GPs with obstetrics training may also carry out this role.

25 Midwifery Council of New Zealand, 2014 midwifery workforce survey.

26 Midwifery Council of New Zealand, 2014 midwifery workforce survey.

27 Midwifery Council of New Zealand, 2014 midwifery workforce survey.

28 See Appendix 4 for a list of professions included under the allied health umbrella. This is not intended to be an exhaustive list; there is a lack of agreement about which professions should be included.

29 See www.workforceinaction.org.nz

30 Social workers are voluntarily regulated under the Social Workers Registration Act 2003, administered by the Ministry of Social Development.

Released 2016 health.govt.nz



Share with your friends:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9


The database is protected by copyright ©dentisty.org 2019
send message

    Main page