Health Canada First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, Ontario Region Emerald Plaza, 3rd



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Health Canada

First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, Ontario Region
Emerald Plaza, 3
rd Floor
1547 Merivale Road
Nepean, Ontario
K1A 0L3


  • Toll Free: 1-866-225-0709

  • Teletypewriter: 1-800-465-7735 (Service Canada)

Brighter Futures and Building Healthy Communities

National Aboriginal Youth Suicide Prevention Strategy

National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program

Indian Residential Schools Mental Health Support Program

A National Indian Residential School Crisis Line has been set up to provide support for former Residential School students. You can access emotional and crisis referral services by calling 24-Hour National Crisis Line: 1-866-925-4419

Objectives:

Bidaaban promotes holistic healing that is culturally based. We Bidaaban promotes holistic healing that is culturally based. We honour the integrity and uniqueness of all Aboriginal people. High quality residential and community based programs foster healing and are delivered with pride and respect.



Key Components:

  • 10 day Anger Management – 1+2 day Workshops, 10 day Sexual Abuse, 10 day Grief and Abandonment and Community Outreach and Communit-based Training.

  • Use of traditions or ceremonies

  • A strong cultural component to Residential Treatment Programming and regular traditional ceremonies through community outreach. Role of Elders

  • Regular involvement of community Elders and traditional people.

  • Role of youth

  • We work with youth through community outreach programming and our young woman’s support group.

  • Client-based

  • The majority of individuals accessing programs found content to be applicable to the problems the identified. Programs have made positive impact on their lives.



Biidaaban Healing Lodge

Aboriginal Healing Lodge providing residential treatment and community outreach programming to First Nations communities in Grief and Abandonment, Anger Management, Sexual Abuse and Social Issues.

PO Box 219
Heron Bay, Ontario
P0T 1R0
Phone: 807-229-3592
Fax: 807-229-0308

The Enaahtig Healing Lodge and Learning Centre provides residential and non-residential healing and learning opportunities for Aboriginal persons and their families. The Lodge also provides a community-based mental health program for children, youth, and adults needing aftercare.



Objectives:_Case_management:_CM_focus_on_Concurrent_Disorders._–_CM-2_focus_on_Family_mental_health_support._Community_networking_and_liaison__Key_Components'>Objectives:

Direct service to community members:



  • Consultative service.

  • Capacity building.

Key Components:

  • Healing and Learning.

  • Use of traditions or ceremonies

  • Medicine Wheel approaches in combination with contemporary mental health clinical approaches.

  • Role of Elders

  • In Mental Health Program – support as required.

  • Role of youth

  • In Mental Health Program – support as required.

  • Systems evaluation. – Client evaluation – Form 4’s. – Ongoing client progress.

  • Generally positive results. Community acceptance.

  • Aboriginal Community Resources. Aboriginal Mental Wellness and Functioning Scale Tool.

Enaahtig Healing Lodge and Learning Centre - AHWS Mental Health Clinician Program

R.R.#1 4184 Vasey Road


Victoria Harbour, Ontario
L0K 2A0
Phone: 705-534-3724
Fax: 705-534-4991

Email: enaahtig@encode.com


Website: enaahtig.ca

The Enaahtig Healing Lodge and Learning Centre (EHLLC) provides residential and non-residential healing and learning opportunities for community members and their families.

The EHLLC also offers an Aboriginal community-based mental health service for Aboriginal adults in Simcoe County such as case management.

Objectives:
Case management: CM focus on Concurrent Disorders. – CM-2 focus on Family mental health support. Community networking and liaison

Key Components:


  • Specialized Case management support.

  • Use of traditions or ceremonies

  • Contemporary clinical approaches. “Shared Care” model. Case management focus.

  • Use Youth and Elders for resource

  • Ongoing systems evaluation. Direct client evaluations – Form 4’s.

Enaahtig Healing Lodge and Learning Centre-MOH Aboriginal Community Mental Health Service

R.R.#1 4184 Vasey Road


Victoria Harbour, Ontario
L0K 2A0
Phone: 705-534-3724,
Fax: 705-534-4991

Email: enaahtig@encode.com


Website: enaahtig.ca

Objectives:
To minimize domestic violence in the community, awareness on domestic violence, educational information domestic violence.

Key Components:

  • Full time 24-hour counselling, emergency housing, advocacy, and support are provided, transportation is provided for residents for appointments.

  • Use of traditions or ceremonies

  • Talking circles, moon ceremonies, smudging, sweats. Cultural programming

  • Elders conduct ceremonies, guidance, and support. Elders counselors on staff

  • Youth attend circles and workshops.

  • Evaluation Design

  • Client-based discharge evaluation, client evaluation surveys, and referrals.

The Akwesasne Family Violence program - Domestic Violence Program

Safe Housing Educational programming Crisis Line 24/7 26 Beds Cultural Programming


MCA
PO Box 579
Cornwall Island/Akwesasne, Ontario
K6H 5T3

Phone: 613-937-4322


Fax: 613-937-4979
Email: catherine.lelievre@akwesasne.ca

Objectives:

  • To provide a safe environment for women and their children who are fleeing abuse.

  • Key Components

  • Eight (8) week stay, communal living, programming, activities, house meetings.

  • Use of traditions or ceremonies

  • Smudges, medicine wheel, holistic approach.

  • Elders are brought in to discuss anything with employees or with residents.

Anishnaabe Kwewag Gamig - Women's Centre

PO Box 39


Roseneath, Ontario
K0K 2X0
Phone: 905-352-3898
Fax: 903-352-2225

Dilico Ojibway Child and Family Services embraces a holistic approach in the delivery of Health, Mental Health, Addictions, and Child Welfare services to compliment the strengths, values, and traditions of Anishinabek children, families, and communities. Dilico Ojibway Child and Family Services was established in January 1987 to address the concerns of First Nations regarding the high number of Native children in the care of the Children’s Aid Societies. Believing that our families and communities have the right to direct the development of their children and themselves, in accordance with Anishnabe values, traditions, and beliefs, we developed and implemented a Native child welfare service that would strengthen, maintain and support Anishnabe children and families in the Robinson-Superior Treaty area. Dilico Ojibway Child and Family Services believes that the family unit is irreplaceable and that no child welfare program or organization can truly fulfill a child’s need for love, acceptance, guidance, encouragement, and trust. Physical, emotional, mental and spiritual well-being must begin with the individual and then extend to the family unit, positively affecting the community as a whole. In assisting the individual to achieve improved or enhanced wellbeing, that individual’s family, community, and nation must be examined and assisted.

Objectives:


  • To reduce incidents of suicidal behaviour, complete suicides, attempted suicides and to provide training in suicide prevention and intervention to all staff.

  • Key Components

  • Suicide prevention protocol, Anishinabek suicide resource manual, problem gambling resource manual and child welfare workers.

  • They hold traditional ceremonies such as the sweat lodge, smudging and the medicine wheel as a tool for healing.

  • The Elders provide support and guidance to the staff and clients, conduct traditional ceremonies and participate in the summer camps.

  • This organization is in the process of developing a youth council. They hosted a leaders- in-training program for youth and the youth participate in the programming of the centre.

Dilico Ojibway Child & Family Services - Suicide Prevention Program

Dilico Ojibway Child & Family Services


200 Anemki Place
Fort William First Nation, Ontario
P7J 1L6

Phone: 807-623-8511


Fax: 807-626-7999
Email: dilico@tbyetl.net

Please refer to the Aboriginal Healing and Wellness Strategy Suicide Prevention Toolkit for more information. All 50 communities within NAN region have received training in Suicide Prevention and Intervention and the training is ongoing. NAN Suicide Prevention Programs focus on the strength of family values and spirituality to help combat the high rate of youth suicide in the NAN Territory. For additional information, please contact the NAN Crisis Team Training Coordinator at the NAN regional office at: 807-625-4918.

Objectives:


  • To obtain funding for special programs in order to educate and keep the youth busy and out of trouble.

  • Use of traditions or ceremonies

  • Sweatlodges.

  • Elders communicate on radio.

Neskantaga First Nation - Suicide Prevention Program

Project Director:


Peter Moonias
Chief, Neskantaga First Nation
Neskantaga Reserve #239 PO Box 105
Lansdowne House , Ontario
P0T 1Z0

Phone: 807-479-2570


Fax: 807-479-1138

NAN Suicide Prevention Programs focus on the strength of family values and spirituality to help combat the high rate of youth suicide in the NAN Territory. For additional information, please contact the NAN Crisis Team Training Coordinator at the NAN regional office at: 807-625-4918. Please refer to the Aboriginal Healing and Wellness Strategy Suicide Prevention Toolkit for more information.



Objectives:

To provide health and social services by using a holistic approach to guide their interaction and provision of services for the collective benefit of Mo-Creebec. They use Cree traditions of freedom and sharing, responsibility to oneself, ones family and to the community as a whole. They promote awareness, empowerment and healing of their membership.



Key Components:

  • The Crisis Intervention Worker, Health Director and Health services offer support, prevention, intervention and training for frontline workers. They identify the needs of their Elders, youth and other community members.

  • The Elders offer support in times of crisis. The Elders come every morning for breakfast and the youth come and sit with them to talk about anything.

  • They have recreational activities for the youth such as baseball, basketball and dances as well as traditional cultural components such as fishing and other outdoor activities.

Mocreebec Council of the Cree Nation - Suicide Prevention Program

Project Director:


Randy Kapashesit
Chief, Mocreebec Council of the Cree Nation
PO Box 4
Moose Factory, Ontario
P0L 1W0

Phone: 705-658-4769


Fax: 705-658-4487
Email: George.small@mocreebec.com

Please refer to the Aboriginal Healing and Wellness Strategy Suicide Prevention Toolkit for more information. All 50 communities within NAN region have received training in Suicide Prevention and Intervention and the training is ongoing. NAN Suicide Prevention Programs focus on the strength of family values and spirituality to help combat the high rate of youth suicide in the NAN Territory. For additional information, please contact the NAN Crisis Team Training Coordinator at the NAN regional office at: 807-625-4918.



Objectives:

To strengthen, support and educate the community.



Key Components:

  • The Crisis team members work together in times of crisis. They held one workshop on suicide prevention.

  • Elders offer support and guidance during times of crisis.

  • Some youth offer support during times of crisis. This community is opening up a youth facility for sporting and recreational activities in order to keep the youth busy and out of trouble.

Bearskin Lake First Nation - Suicide Prevention Program

Project Director:


Rodney McKay
Chief, Bearskin Lake First Nation
PO Box 25
Bearskin Lake, Ontario
P0V 1E0

Phone: 807-363-2518


Fax: 807-363-1066

Please refer to the Aboriginal Healing and Wellness Strategy Suicide Prevention Toolkit for more information. All 50 communities within NAN region have received training in Suicide Prevention and Intervention and the training is ongoing. NAN Suicide Prevention Programs focus on the strength of family values and spirituality to help combat the high rate of youth suicide in the NAN Territory. For additional information, please contact the NAN Crisis Team Training Coordinator at the NAN regional office @ 807-625-4918.



Objectives:

  • To meet individual and community needs and to provide support.

  • To develop and the physical, mental, emotional and spiritual well being of community members.

  • To focus on wellness, families and individuals and crisis.

Key Components:

  • Promotion, prevention and rehabilitation approaches.

  • Use of traditions or ceremonies

  • Supports are present but at times they attend Mental Health and are than referred to outside community services.

  • Elders are present in the community to provide support on an individual basis.

  • Brighter Futures Program is present in the community to provide support but needs other activities to increase youth involvement and needs Band council support for recreational activities into the community.

Weenusk First Nation - Suicide Prevention Program

Project Director:


Mike Wabano
Chief, Weenusk First Nation
Phone: 705-473-2554
Fax: 705-473-2503

Objectives:

The main objective of the project is to provide mental health services to Native individuals in the communities of our District. It is hoped that by providing intervention services they can assist individuals in healing their issues. The prevention services are aimed at various different age groups to try and provide information to as many people in the communities as possible around issues that directly affect them and the community.



Key Components:

  • One of the key components of this program is that services are provided in the community that request it. Both intervention and prevention services can be provided in any of the First Nation communities. Another component is the location of the Gizhewaadiziwin Health Access Centre is very central and accessible for most people.

  • Use of traditions or ceremonies

  • The services provided can involve traditional cultural practices, if the client requests this. If traditional practices are requested, the Traditional Healing Coordinator is consulted to assist. Examples of requests may be for a sweat lodge, a naming ceremony, a healing circle, a blessing ceremony, etc. All workshops, presentations and groups done in the community involve a traditional opening and closing ceremony conducted by an Elder in the community to meet the community cultural norms.

  • As indicated above, Elders and the Traditional Healing Coordinator are consulted and utilized whenever needed to ensure cultural traditions and practices are upheld.

  • Many communities are beginning to involve the youth through participation in educational and preventative workshops. One of the communities has developed a Youth Council to assist in the overall planning of activities.

Gizhewaadiziwin Health Access Centre - Mental Health Program

Project Director:


Marlis Bruyere
Executive Director, Gizhewaadiziwin Health Access Centre
PO Box 686
Fort Frances, Ontario
P9A 3M3

Phone: 807-274-3131


Fax: 807-274-6280

The mental health program offers quality mental health services to Aboriginal peoples in the Rainy River District, both on and off reserve. The mental health worker is part of an interdisciplinary team that consists of doctors, nurses, nurse practitioners, dietitian, asthma coordinator, FASD program workers, health educator, child nutritionist, medical translator, and a traditional healing coordinator. The Gizhewaadiziwin Health Access Centre utilizes a holistic approach to health in all the services provided. The mental health program offers both intervention services such as counselling and prevention/education services such as workshops and presentations.



Objectives:

AHWS fosters and promotes integration of traditional and culturally appropriate approaches to healing and wellness in Aboriginal communities with contemporary strategies, while supporting better access to the type of care and services for Aboriginal People that most other Ontarians take for granted. As a result of the efforts of the Strategy’s participants, more and more Aboriginal people are receiving the kinds of holistic health and healing services health they have sought for many years and are enjoying an improvement in the quality of care they receive. An important feature of the Strategy is that programs and services are Aboriginal designed, delivered and managed. Empowerment is a key aspect in promoting wellness in Aboriginal communities striving for self-reliance by using traditional and cultural teachings and values that kept them strong in the past.



Key Components:

  • The strategy offer a variety of programs -Aboriginal Health Access Centres -Aboriginal Health Planning Authorities -Family Violence Healing Programs -Healing Lodges -Information Clearinghouse -Maternal and Child Centre -Mental Health Program -Outpatient Hostels -Patient Advocates -Shelters -Translator Services -Treatment Centres -Aboriginal Healthy Babies/Healthy Children Program

  • Use of traditions or ceremonies

  • AHWS adopted a number of principles which AHWS-funded projects attempt to incorporate into their programming: – The physical, mental, emotional and spiritual needs of the individual are addressed through various aspects of wholistic programming. – Programming is aimed at providing services throughout the lifecycle of the individual, from infancy through childhood, youth, adulthood, senior and Elderhood. – Programming is designed to address multiple needs along a continuum of care/service using health promotion, prevention, curative and rehabilitation approaches. – Community development and capacity-building are encouraged and promoted through inter-agency linkages, co-operation, community involvement, training and other means. – Programming is community-based and culturally-based with great latitude to offer and support Traditional approaches to healing and wellness.

  • Role of Elders
    The presence of elders and the use of traditional practices facilitate a dynamic not only of healing, but also of teaching and learning.

Aboriginal Healing and Wellness Strategy

Project Director:


Michele Harding
Manager, Aboriginal Healing and Wellness Strategy
880 Bay Street, 2nd Floor
Toronto, Ontario
M7A 2B6

Phone: 416-326-6905


Fax: 416-326-7934
Email: michele.harding@css.gov.on.ca

Aboriginal health is holistic and includes the physical, mental, emotional, spiritual and cultural aspects of life. Through this understanding, a vision of wellness which balances body, mind, emotion and spirit is promoted throughout the healing continuum. The goal of the Aboriginal Healing and Wellness Strategy (AHWS) is to foster improvements in the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal individuals, families, communities and nations through: provision of equitable access to primary health and healing services and programs, including prevention, treatment and support, that are culturally appropriate and culturally competent; .building on the strengths and enhancing the capacities of Aboriginal communities; .promotion of equitable, violence-free relationships and healthy environments. A unique collaborative process, the Strategy was developed to address the limitations of existing services and programs, and to identify and implement culturally appropriate solutions.

We are a fully accredited 60-bed hospital and a 20-bed extended care facility. We provide health services to all residents within Sioux Lookout and the surrounding area, including the Nishnawbe Aski communities north of Sioux Lookout, the Treaty #3 community of Lac Seul First Nation, and residents of Hudson, Pickle Lake, and Savant Lake.

“MenoYaWin” in the Anishinaabe language means “health, wellness, well-being”, and refers to holistic healing and wellness, the “whole self-being in a state of complete wellness”.


Our care is based on recognizing the relationship of the physical, emotional, mental and spiritual aspects of a person.

Sioux Lookout Meno Ya Win Health Centre

Sioux Lookout Meno Ya Win


Health Centre
1 Meno Ya Win Way
P.O. Box 909
Sioux Lookout, Ontario
P8T 1B4
Phone
(807) 737-3030

Other Programs

Healing Our Own Counselling Unit

112 Ontario Street


Thunder Bay, Ontario, P7B 3G2
TEL: (807)344-9579

Family Court Support Program

112 Ontario Street


Thunder Bay, Ontario, P7B 3G2
TEL: (807) 344-9579 Ext 2100

Native Women’s Crisis Home

Crisis Line: (807)346-HELP (4357)


Toll-Free: 1-888-200-9997
Community Action Plan for Children
541 Luci Court
Thunder Bay, Ontario, P7E 1H2
TEL: (807) 622-5445

WAKAIGIN Housing

541 Luci Court


Thunder Bay, Ontario, P7E 1H2
TEL: (807) 628-0625

Transitional Housing Support Program

112 Ontario Street


Thunder Bay, Ontario, P7B 3G2
TEL: (807)344-9579

Prenatal Program

541 Luci Court


Thunder Bay, Ontario, P7E 1H2
TEL: (807) 628-0624

National Native Alcohol & Drug Addiction Program (NNADAP)

112 Ontario Street


Thunder Bay, Ontario, P7B 3G2
TEL: (807) 344-9579 Ext 1400


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