Generic respirator sop



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GENERIC RESPIRATOR SOP

The following documents are provided as models for command respirator policies and standard operating procedures (SOPs). This Generic SOP reflects Navy respirator policies in OPNAVINST 5100.23 Series, which are based on 29 CFR 1910.134. Every attempt was made to make these SOPs as comprehensive as possible. The intent is for Respiratory Protection Program Managers to review this document and tailor sections that are applicable to the needs of their program.


The first document is a model for establishing command respiratory protection program instructions. Subsequent enclosures cover individual facets of the program.

_(Name of Command) Instruction (number)_

From: Commanding Officer, _(Name of Command)_
Subj: RESPIRATORY PROTECTION PROGRAM
Ref: (a) 29 CFR 1910.134, Occupational Safety and Health

Administration Respiratory Protection Standard

(b) OPNAVINST 5100.23 Series, Navy Occupational Safety and Health

Program Manual

(c) NAVMCPUBHLTHCEN Technical Manual, Industrial Hygiene Field

Operations Manual, latest revision

(d) NAVMCPUBHLTHCEN Technical Manual OM 6260, Occupational Medical

Surveillance Procedures Manual and Medical Matrix, latest edition

(e) BUMED Notice 6110, Tracking and Reporting Individual Medical Readiness Data
Encl: (1) Worksite Standard Operating Procedures

(2) Respiratory Protection Program Manager Appointment Letter

(3) Respirator Selection Criteria

(4) Respirator Maintenance

(5) Respirator Inspection Procedures

(6) Respirator Training, Fit Testing, and Medical Clearance Record

(7) Training

(8) Fit Testing

(9) Respiratory Protection Program Audit

(10) Respiratory Protection Program Site Evaluation

(11) Respirator Qualification Cards

(12) Appendix D, 29 CFR 1910.134



(13) Respirator Cartridge Change Out Schedules
1. Purpose. To establish a respiratory protection program at the (name of command) as required by references (a) and (b).
2. Basic Policy. It is this command's policy to provide a safe and healthful work environment in compliance with all Navy and Federal standards. To protect employees from inhalation hazards produced during worksite operations, engineering controls will be used whenever possible to control air contaminants at their source of generation.
3. Scope
a. This command has made a commitment to establish and maintain a respiratory protection program for the protection of employees where respirators are used: (1) as an interim measure until proper engineering controls can be installed; (2) where engineering controls are not feasible; (3) where emergency respirators are required; and (4) where respiratory protection must be worn in addition to engineering controls.
b. The respiratory protection program will include written Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for each program element, including: hazard assessment; respirator selection and issue; cartridge change out schedules; fit testing; medical surveillance; equipment cleaning, storage, inspection, and maintenance; and program evaluation.
c. Standard operating procedures shall be developed for the specific respiratory protection requirements of each workplace. Workplace SOPs will be posted in the work areas and will include applicable attachments to enclosure (1), which include a summary of the command respiratory protection program standard operating procedures; shop-specific details concerning respirator selection, maintenance and inspection procedures; breathing-air quality, if applicable; emergency use respirators and respirator cartridge change out schedules.
4. Responsibilities
a. Commanding Officer. The Commanding Officer is responsible for establishing a respiratory protection program and appointing a qualified respiratory protection program manager. (Enclosure (2) is a sample appointment letter).
b. Respiratory Protection Program Manager (RPPM). The RPPM must complete a training course as specified in paragraph 1512. of reference (b).
(1) The responsibility for administration of this program rests with the respiratory protection program manager.
(2) The specific duties of the program manager include, but are not limited to:
(a) Selecting and purchasing appropriate, approved respiratory protection based on industrial hygiene survey reports, references (a), (b), and (c), and available literature.
(b) Develop respirator cartridge change out schedules.
(c) Training personnel in the proper use, limitations, and maintenance of respirators.
(d) Conducting respirator fit testing.
(e) Developing procedures for regular cleaning and inspection.
(f) Designating appropriate storage locations and procedures.
(g) Developing procedures for inventory control.
(h) Establishing a medical surveillance program based on Bureau of Medicine (BUMED) industrial hygiene surveys and medical recommendations.
(i) Annual evaluation (audit) and modification of the written respirator program and standard operating procedures.
These responsibilities are further described in the enclosures.
c. Shop Supervisors. Shop supervisors must have a thorough understanding of every aspect of the command SOP and of Chapter 15 of reference (b). They shall ensure that:
(1) Respirators are properly worn and maintained by shop personnel.
(2) A copy of the command SOP is kept in each shop office.
d. Respirator Issuers. Respirator issuers have responsibility for issuing, inspecting, maintaining, and inventorying respirators. Additional information is provided throughout this instruction and in enclosures (1), (4), and (5).
e. Employees. Employees are responsible for inspecting their respirators and notifying the RPPM of any defects. Each employee must perform positive and negative user seal checks on tight fitting respirators before each use per enclosure (1), Attachment I-3. Employees shall also maintain and store their respirators according to procedures established in this instruction.
f. Bureau of Medicine (BUMED) (or Commanding Officer, Medical Treatment Facility). BUMED is required by reference (b) to provide the following services:
(1) Perform periodic industrial hygiene survey according to Appendix 8-B of reference (b) to identify the workplace hazards and recommend respiratory protection.
(2) Provide the RPPM with a written evaluation of the effectiveness of the respirator program at the time of the periodic industrial hygiene survey.
(3) Medically evaluate personnel identified to wear respiratory protection.
5. Respiratory Protection Program Elements
a. Respirator Selection
(1) Respirator selection is based on the hazards to which the employees are exposed, as determined by annual industrial hygiene surveys. Respirators are selected by the RPPM using the guidelines in enclosure (3).
(2) Only respirators jointly approved by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) or NIOSH and Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) will be worn.
b. Cleaning, Disinfecting, Issuing, and Inventory Control. Procedures for cleaning, disinfecting, issuing, and inventorying respirators are in enclosure (4).
c. Inspection, Repair, and Storage
(1) Inspection. Respirator inspection will be conducted by the respirator issuer as they disassemble respirators for cleaning. Detailed procedures for inspecting half mask, full facepiece, gas mask, airline, SCBA, and hooded respirators are provided in enclosure (5). These procedures will be included in individual worksite SOPs, as appropriate.
Employees shall inspect their respirators prior to donning them. They are also responsible for ensuring that cartridges are inserted correctly into the respirator (e.g., not cross-threaded). Defective or dirty respirators shall not be used.
(2) Repair. The RPPM shall ensure that respirator issuers are trained to perform respirator repairs. Respirator issuers will make no attempt to replace components or make adjustments beyond the recommendations of the manufacturer. Reducing or admission valves, alarms, and regulators must be returned to the manufacturer or to a factory certified, trained technician for adjustment or repair.
(3) Storage. Each employee will store their respirator in a clean plastic bag in their locker. Storage in tool boxes is prohibited. Respirators will be laid flat in a natural position, and will be protected from sunlight, chemicals, or excessive temperatures. Emergency respirators will be stored in the shop location specified in the shop's SOP. (See enclosure (1), Attachment D).
(4) Emergency Respirators. Emergency respirators will be cleaned and inspected after each use according to the manufacturer's instructions (See enclosure (1), Attachment E). Emergency respirators will be inspected monthly and a written record (enclosure (1), Attachment D) will be maintained with the respirator.
d. Breathing Air Quality. Sources of compressed breathing air for atmosphere supplying respirators will be tested quarterly to ensure that air quality meets the minimum Grade D requirements of the Compressed Gas Association Commodity Specification for Air, Pamphlet

G-7.1-2004.


(1) Name of activity personnel or name of contractor, etc. is responsible for testing the breathing air with Dräger Aerotest Kit, for testing breathing air for carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide, oil, and water along with the Biosystems four-gas Analyzer for testing oxygen levels (Note: These products are mentioned only for illustrative purposes. Mention of these products does not constitute an endorsement by the Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center or the Department of the Navy. Results of these tests will be recorded in enclosure (1), Attachments F and F-1, for each shop using breathing air compressors.
(2) Name of person in building number is responsible for recording the breathing air test results and ensuring that the air compressor CO alarm systems, high temperature alarms, sorbent beds and filters are maintained and inspected before each use; CO monitor and alarm systems are calibrated per manufacturer’s recommendations; and that the inspection results are recorded on enclosure (1), Attachment G. Name of person can be reached by telephone at phone number . Current copies of enclosure (1), Attachments F-1 and G will be kept at the applicable shop offices.
(3) (Applicable to ships only) Use of ship's low pressure (LP) air as a breathing air source is prohibited unless the air is tested and certified as Grade D as required in paragraph 5.d. of this instruction.
e. Medical Evaluation. BUMED (Commanding Officer, Medical Treatment Facility (MTF)) will make all decisions regarding the medical evaluation and determination of the employees' physiological and psychological ability to wear a respirator according to the protocols for respirator users (Medical Matrix Program 716) in reference (d).
(1) Each individual must be medically qualified by BUMED before initial fit testing.
(2) For civilians, shop supervisors will complete the top portion of the medical clearance form (enclosure (1), Attachment H), and shop personnel will hand carry the form with them to their respirator medical evaluation at the name of MTF MTF. Upon completion of the medical evaluation, attending medical treatment personnel will complete the medical clearance form, and shop personnel will hand carry the form back to the shop supervisor, who gives a copy to the RPPM.
(3) The RPPM will record the medical clearance information on the employees' record (enclosure (6)).
(4) Military personnel, who have been confirmed as “Fit for Full Duty” and having a current annual Periodic Health Assessment (PHA), are deemed medically qualified for use of all types of respirators. The phrase “Fit for Full Duty” is interpreted as having no deployment-limiting conditions. This is consistent with a “fully or partially medically ready status” of the Individual Medical Readiness (IMR) classification described in reference (e). PHA screening, IMR and deployment readiness tracking for activity military personnel is accomplished and verified by the IMR point of contact at the local MTF. The name and phone number of the IMR point of contact is name of IMR POC and their phone number IMR POC Phone number . This information is recorded on (enclosure (6)). Questionable cases will be referred to the MTF for a Respirator User Certification exam (Medical Matrix Program 716).
f. Training. Respirator training requirements are specified in enclosure (7). Shop SOPs for training are in enclosure (1), Attachment I.
g. Fit Testing. Fit testing procedures shall be performed as stated in enclosure (8). Fit test operator training and evaluation will be conducted according to enclosures (8-3) and (8-4).
h. Workplace Surveillance and Program Evaluation
(1) Workplace Surveillance. Personal air samples must be collected to determine 8 hour time weighted average (TWA) exposures and short term exposures. Air sampling is performed by BUMED industrial hygienists. Air sampling results will be made known to the employees within five days after they are received by this command.

(a) Shop supervisors will immediately contact the cognizant BUMED industrial hygienist when there are any changes in operations. The industrial hygienist will reevaluate the process and collect additional air samples if necessary.


(b) Shop supervisors will immediately notify the cognizant BUMED industrial hygienist when ventilation systems are installed or changes to the systems implemented. The industrial hygienist will evaluate the system and reevaluate the requirements for respiratory protection.
(2) Program Evaluation. The RPPM will:
(a) Conduct an annual audit of the respirator program. Enclosure (9) is provided as guidance.
(b) Conduct periodic random, inspections of work areas where respirators are worn to ensure that the correct respirators are being used, that they are being worn properly, and that they are in good working condition. The RPPM will maintain a record of inspection dates and findings using enclosure (10) and ensure that copies are provided to the appropriate shop supervisors.
(c) Per paragraph 1513.b.(2)(a) of reference (b), BUMED will provide a written evaluation on the effectiveness of the respirator program to the program manager based on occupational medicine and industrial hygiene reviews. In agreement with the local BUMED industrial hygienist, this evaluation will be provided along with the periodic industrial hygiene survey.
(d) The RPPM shall act immediately to correct all faults found in the program and/or procedures.
i. Record Keeping. The program manager will document the medical clearance, training, and fit testing, to include the type of respirator, brand name and model, size, method of fit test, test results, test date, and person performing the fit test (enclosure (6)). Completed Medical Clearance Forms (enclosure (1), Attachment H) and printouts from quantitative fit testing must be attached to enclosure (6). Employees will be issued a card (enclosure (11)) indicating which model and size respirator(s) they are qualified to wear. This card must be presented at the time of respirator issue. Employees will immediately report lost or stolen cards to the RPPM so that a replacement can be issued.
j. Facial Hair, Contact Lenses, and Voluntary Use of Respirators.
(1) Facial hair. Per paragraph 5.a.(1)(b) of reference (c), no respiratory protection, except for loose fitting positive pressure supplied-air respirators, or loose fitting powered air purifying respirators, where appropriate, will be worn by personnel when conditions such as beards, sideburns, etc., may prevent a good face seal.
(2) Contact Lenses, Corrective Eye Glasses, and Spectacle Kits. Wearing contact lenses in contaminated atmospheres with respiratory protection is permitted as long as eye and face

protection is worn as appropriate for workers exposed to eye injury hazards. If wearing corrective eye glasses with half mask respirators, lenses shall meet the ANSI Standard Z87.1 requirements. Corrective eye glasses must not interfere with the fit of half mask respirators. Spectacle kits will be provided for personnel needing vision correction who are required to wear full face respirators. If work processes require full face respirators with impact protection, check with the respirator manufacturer to ensure respirator lenses comply with ANSI Z87.1 impact testing requirements.


(3) Voluntary use of Respirators. Per paragraph 1503.g. and page 20 of the Glossary in reference (b), the command RPPM may issue NIOSH approved filtering facepiece respirators for voluntary use. Voluntary respirator use is defined as personnel choosing to wear respirators when their use is not required to control exposures or when respirators are not required by this command. NIOSH approved filtering facepiece respirators (dust masks) may be issued under the control of the RPPM without medical screening and fit testing for all perceived particulate hazards. Voluntary respirator users will be trained annually on the limitations stated on the respirator approval label and the information contained in Appendix D of 29 CFR 1910.134 (Enclosure (12)). The RPPM must ensure these respirators are not dirty or contaminated and that they do not interfere with working safely. When the perceived contaminant is a gas or vapor, NIOSH approved elastomeric respirators equipped with appropriate chemical cartridges may be issued for voluntary respirator use. All respirators issued for voluntary use, other than filtering facepiece respirators, require enrollment in the complete respirator program.
k. Respirator Cartridge Change Out Schedules. Reference (a) no longer allows reliance on odor thresholds and other warning properties as the sole basis for determining that an air-purifying respirator will afford adequate protection against exposure to gas and vapor contaminants. When available, respirator cartridges with end-of-service-life-indicators (ESLI) shall be worn. The ESLI must be visible either on the cartridge from eye level or ESLI cartridges must be worn on plenum respirators that are attached to the belt for visibility. Reference (a) requires basing change out schedules for chemical cartridges on objective information or data that will ensure that cartridges are changed before the end of their service life. The preamble to reference (a) states that the basis for cartridge change out schedules should ideally be based on tests of breakthrough studies that are conducted under worst-case conditions of contaminant concentration, humidity, temperature and breathing rate. Standard operating procedures for establishing, verifying, and implementing respirator cartridge change out schedules are in enclosure (13). Chemical cartridge air-purifying respirators may be used (up to their maximum use concentration) for protection against gas and vapor contaminants, including substances without good warning properties, as long as a cartridge change out schedule is developed and implemented.

WORKSITE STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES

Attachment A - Respirator Standard Operating Procedure


Attachment B - Respirator Selection Criteria
Attachment C - Respirator Maintenance
Attachment D - Emergency Use Respirators - Inspection Record
Attachment E - Emergency Use Respirators - Manufacturer's Inspection Instructions
Attachment F - Results of Quarterly Air Quality Testing of Breathing Air Compressors
Attachment G - Inspection of Breathing Air Compressors - Carbon Monoxide Monitor, Carbon

Monoxide And High Temperature Alarms, Filters, Desiccant & Sorbent Beds


Attachment H - Medical Clearance for Respiratory Protection
Attachment I - Respirator Training
Attachment J - Respirator Cartridge Change Out Schedule Worksheet

RESPIRATOR STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE
SHOP _number/name_

Type of respirators respirators were chosen as protection against contaminant during the type of operation_ operation. Rationale for selecting the respirators used in this operation is in Attachment B.
The respiratory protection program manager (RPPM) will conduct inspections of this shop to ensure that the correct respirators are being used; that they are being worn properly; and that they are in good working condition. The respiratory protection program manager's written record of inspection dates and findings shall be maintained with the shop SOP.
Before wearing respirators, all shop number/name personnel must be medically qualified, fit tested, and trained. It is the responsibility of shop number/name personnel to notify the respiratory protection program manager of any of the changes listed below or other circumstances that might interfere with the facial seal of the respirator.
1. weight change of 20 lbs.

2. facial scarring in area of face seal.

3. any dental changes.

4. any reconstructive surgery or cosmetic surgery.


Each employee is responsible for properly wearing and maintaining their respirator. Respirator maintenance procedures are in Attachment C.
If airline respirators are used, refer to the shop's records (Attachments F, F-1, and G) to ensure that grade D breathing air quality and compressor integrity have been maintained.
The RPPM is RPPM's name . He (she) is located in building number and can be reached at telephone number .

RESPIRATOR SELECTION CRITERIA
SHOP _number/name_

Air sampling has revealed contaminant concentrations of number times the number (mg/m3 or ppm) Navy Occupational Exposure Limit (OEL) during the type of operation operation.


Name of contaminant causes biological effect . The physical and chemical properties of contaminant include incompatibilities with names of incompatible chemicals_.
This particular hazard will be corrected by implementing appropriate engineering controls, which will include an exhaust ventilation system. As an interim measure until the system can be installed, respiratory protective equipment will be used. (or Engineering controls are not feasible and respiratory protection is required during this operation. or Despite engineering controls, respiratory protection is still required during this operation.)
For less than IDLH or non-oxygen deficient atmospheres, the minimum protection factor needed will be calculated by the hazard ratio, which is determined by dividing the time-weighted average (TWA) exposure concentration, which is TWA concentration of contaminant by the OEL for the contaminant value of the OEL . For contaminants with a ceiling or short term limit, divide the contaminant concentration by the ceiling or short term limit. The required protection factor is

value of protection factor .
Respirators approved by either NIOSH or NIOSH/MSHA must be used. _Class of respirators_ respirators were selected based on their assigned protection factor of number as set forth in Table 9-1 of reference (c). This will provide protection up to number times the PEL. Name of manufacturer_ and/or name of manufacturer respirators were selected based on successful employee fit testing. The respirators available to employees for the type of operation operation are as follows:
Name of manufacturer Type of respirator respirator, TC‑ _number_, model _number_ (Small) (Medium) (Large)
Name of manufacturer Type of respirator respirator, TC‑ _number_, model _number_ (Small) (Medium) (Large)
Example:

North N95 respirator, TC‑84A ‑ 1099 , model 7706N95 (Medium)

RESPIRATOR MAINTENANCE
SHOP _number/name_

General
Respirator inspection is performed by the respirator issuer in building number while disassembling the respirators for cleaning. The name of the respirator issuer and their phone number are name of respirator issuer and phone number , respectively.
In addition, each employee is responsible for inspecting their respirator and notifying the respirator issuer of any defects.
Each employee must perform positive and negative user seal checks on tight fitting respirators before each use. Respirators on which user seal checks (see enclosure (1), Attachment I-3) cannot be performed must not be worn.
Respirators will be returned to the respirator issuer in building number for cleaning and disinfecting according to the schedule indicated by the following code number: number .
Where: 1 = Daily 3 = Monthly

2 = Weekly 4 = Other


Inspection
Respirators used in this shop will be inspected as follows:
(Insert procedure(s), as appropriate, from enclosure (5)).
Storage
Each employee will store their respirator in a clean plastic zip-lock bag in their locker. Storage in tool boxes is prohibited. The respirator will be laid flat in a natural position, and will be protected from sunlight, chemicals, or excessive temperatures. Emergency respirators will be stored in the shop location specified in enclosure (1), Attachment D.
Employees must present a valid Respirator Qualification Card (Enclosure 11) when requesting issue of a respirator.
EMERGENCY USE RESPIRATORS
INSPECTION RECORD, SHOP _number/name_
Name of manufacturer Type of respirator respirator, TC ‑ _number_, model _number_
The emergency respirator will be stored location of emergency respirator .


Date


Inspection

Findings


Repairs/


Comments

Inspector’s

Signature




























































EMERGENCY USE RESPIRATORS

MANUFACTURER'S INSPECTION INSTRUCTIONS
SHOP _number/name_


__ Name of manufacturer Type of respirator respirator, TC ‑ _number_, model _number_

(Attach manufacturer's inspection instructions here or staple to this page).



COMPRESSOR

BREATHING AIR QUALITY REPORT

Compressor Model: Date:________


Serial No:
COMPONENT ANALYZED SPECIFICATION RESULTS
Oxygen 19.5 - 23.05 % %
Carbon Dioxide 1000 PPM Max ppm
Carbon Monoxide 10 ppm Max ppm
Oil 5 mg/m3 mg/m3
Water Vapor 18 mg/m3 (24 ppm v/v) mg/m3

or


ppm

Or moisture content corresponding to the dew point at 1 atm. that is at least 100 F lower than the temperature in which the respirator will be worn (see note 3 to Table 1 and Table 3 of CGA G-7.1-2004)


Odor Not Objectionable

This is to certify that the above referenced sample DOES/DOES NOT meet the Grade D air purity standards for compressed breathing air per CGA G-7.1-1997.


Sample Taken By:____________________________________

Next Sample Due on______________




RESULTS OF QUARTERLY AIR QUALITY TESTING OF

BREATHING-AIR COMPRESSORS
SHOP _number/name_


Date




Passed/Failed

Grade D Air

Air Line


Pressure Measured

at Respirator



Signature




































































































INSPECTION OF BREATHING-AIR COMPRESSORS
CARBON MONOXIDE MONITOR, CARBON MONOXIDE, AND HIGH TEMPERATURE ALARMS,

FILTERS, DESICCANT & SORBENT BEDS

SHOP _number/name_



Date

CO/High Temp. Alarm

Operational?

Calibration?

CO Monitor

Reading

Condition of

Air Purifiers

Air Purifiers

Changed (date)


Signature






































































REQUEST FOR MEDICAL CLEARANCE

FOR RESPIRATOR USE QUESTIONNAIRE

SHOP _number/name_

Note: Combine this page with Enclosure (6) to provide a complete respirator history record.
EMPLOYEE: SSN: Position:
Supervisor: Phone: Code: Department:


CIRCLE THE TYPE OF RESPIRATOR(S) TO BE USED:
AIR-SUPPLIED (tight fitting) AIR-PURIFYING (POWERED) (tight fitting)
AIR-SUPPLIED (hooded) AIR-PURIFYING (POWERED) (hooded)
OPEN-CIRCUIT SCBA AIR-PURIFYING (NON-POWERED)

Filtering facepiece or elastomeric

CLOSED-CIRCUIT SCBA N, R, P 95, 99, 100

Type of chemical cartridge:_______________

COMBINATION AIRLINE/SCBA

WORK EFFORT: (CIRCLE ONE)

Light Moderate Heavy Strenuous



EXTENT OF Usage: (CIRCLE ONE)

1. On a daily basis

2. Occasionally - but more than once a week

3. Rarely - or for emergency situations only



LENGTH OF AVERAGE WORK DAY IN RESPIRATOR:
SPECIAL WORK CONDITIONS: (i.e., confined spaces, high places, temperature/humidity extremes, hazardous materials, other protective clothing worn, climbing, etc.)





MEDICAL WRITTEN EVALUATION
1. No restrictions on the respirators circled above

2. Respirator use with some restrictions

3. No respirator use allowed

4. Alternate respirator recommended


Comments/Restrictions:






(under 35) (35-45) (over 45)

Routine Follow-up medical evaluation required: 5 yrs 2 yrs 1 yr
Or due to medical findings return: Date:______________
Employee has been given a copy of this recommendation.
Health care professional's Signature:_____________________________ Date:____________

Sections 133, 1071-87, 3012, 5031, and 8012, Title 10

USC & Exec. Order 9397 (Privacy Act of 1974) Apply
RESPIRATOR TRAINING

SHOP _number/name_


1. Respirators are required to be worn because the contaminant concentration in the work area is above the occupational exposure limit (OEL).
2. contaminant causes biological effect .
3. Respirators are only an interim measure until proper ventilation can be installed to capture the contaminant at the source of generation (or Engineering controls are not feasible and respiratory protection is required during this operation. or Despite engineering controls, respiratory protection is still required during this operation.)
4. contaminant concentration is number to number times the OEL and the respirators were chosen because they provide a protection factor that is number times the OEL.
5. Limitations of different respirators:
a. Air-purifying respirators do not provide protection against oxygen deficiency and cannot be worn when there is less than l9.5% oxygen in the air.
b. Air-purifying respirators cannot be used in IDLH atmospheres.
c. Particulate filters remove particles in the air.
(1) N series filter respirators cannot be worn in oil aerosol atmospheres, R series filter respirators can be worn eight hours in oil aerosol atmospheres, and P series filter respirators can be worn in oil aerosol atmospheres up to a time limit set by the respirator manufacturer.
(2) Particulate filters cannot remove gas and vapor contaminants.
d. Chemical cartridges remove gases and vapors but will not remove particulates.
(1) Chemical cartridges have a maximum use concentration that is calculated by multiplying the OEL by the assigned protection of the respirator or set by the respirator manufacturer.
e. Airline respirator hoses are limited to a maximum hose length of 300 feet but not all airline respirators have been approved for 300 feet of hose.
(1) Airline respirators are not approved for IDLH atmospheres. Loss of the breathing air source eliminates any protection to the respirator wearer.
f. SCBAs are limited by service time of the air cylinder and weight of the unit.
6. Explain how to don the respirator, how to maintain and inspect the respirator, and how to perform positive and negative pressure user seal checks according to enclosure (1),

Attachment I-3.


7. Filters must be changed when increased breathing difficulty is first experienced and chemical cartridges must be changed according to the cartridge change out schedule.
a. Explain chemical cartridge change out schedule and breakthrough (smelling the vapor/gas of concern inside the respirator).
b. Give any odor characteristics that may help employees identify when breakthrough occurs (e.g., isoamyl acetate smells like bananas; hydrogen sulfide smells like rotten eggs).
c. Change your cartridge time interval . Chemical cartridges must be changed if break-through is experienced before scheduled change out time.
8. Inform employees what to do in emergency situations.
9. Explain shop-specific respirator problems concerning:
a. Communications

b. Vision

c. Use in excessive heat or cold

d. IDLH and oxygen deficient atmospheres

e. Confined spaces
10. Explain command policies concerning:
a. Medical evaluation

b. Facial hair

c. Contact lenses

d. Issue of voluntary use respirators


11. Emergency rescue teams and all personnel required to enter IDLH atmospheres will receive training in the use of the emergency respirators by the manufacturer's technical representatives.
a. The gas free engineer will teach these individuals emergency IDLH atmosphere entry procedures and provide emergency practice scenarios.
12. Breathing air from closed-circuit escape only respirators can be very hot and dry. The temperature allowed by NIOSH for 10 minute escape devices is 135o F. Breathing this air will be uncomfortable but is a small tradeoff for escaping from an IDLH atmosphere.

USER SEAL CHECKS
The user shall check the seal of the respirator by using positive and negative pressure user seal checks every time a respirator is donned. These pressure checks are NOT substitutes for quantitative or qualitative fit tests. It is essential to adequately train respirator users to perform these checks. User seal checks should be done according to the manufacturer’s recommendations, or by using the following procedures:




Negative pressure user seal check.
The inlet opening of the respirator’s canister(s), cartridge(s),

or filter(s) is closed off by covering with the palm of the hand(s)

or by squeezing a breathing tube or blocking its inlet so that it will

not allow the passage of air.


The wearer is instructed to inhale gently and hold their breath for at least 10 seconds.
If the facepiece collapses slightly and no inward leakage of air is detected, the respirator has been properly donned and the facepiece is not leaking.

Negative Pressure User Seal Check


Positive pressure user seal check.



The exhalation valve or breathing tube, or both, is closed off and the wearer is instructed to exhale gently.


If a slight positive pressure can be built up inside the facepiece (e.g., facepiece bulges slightly outward) without detecting any outward leakage of air between the sealing surface of the facepiece and the wearer’s face, the respirator has been properly donned.
For some respirators, this test method requires that the respirator wearer first remove the exhalation valve cover from the respirator and then replace it after completion of the test. These tasks are often difficult to carry out without disturbing the fit of the respirator. OSHA states in the preamble to reference (a) that there are respirators that user seal checks cannot be performed on and that these respirators cannot be used to control exposure.

Positive Pressure User Seal Check




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