Fall 2015 Final



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Fall 2015 Final



Do NOT mark on this Exam! It is part of a CLASS SET!

Quotation Identification: Match the quotations below with the correct author/work. Answers may be used once, more than once, or not at all.


a. “Lost in Translation”— Boroditsky

b. Excerpt from You’re Wearing That?Tannen

c. Introduction to Language of Oppression &

“Dehumanizing People and Euphemizing War”—

Bosmajian

d.“AIDS: The Linguistic Battlefield”—Callen

e. “Our Use of Little Words”--Spiegel

ab. NEA Freedom of Expression article —Van Camp

ac. “How to Tame a Wild Tongue”— Anzaldúa

ad. Through the Dark Continent (excerpt)—Stanley




ae. Travels in West Africa (excerpts)—Kingsley

bc. Over the Edge: Death in the Grand Canyon (excerpts)—

Ghiglieri & Myers

bd. St. Crispin’s Day Speech—Shakespeare

be. Address to the Virginia Convention—Patrick Henry

cd. Second Inaugural Address—Lincoln

ce. Free Speech in Wartime—La Follette

de. We Shall Fight on the Beaches—Churchill

abc. Vietnam Veterans Against the War Speech—Kerry

bcd. The Demon in the Freezer—Preston



cde. The Devil in the White City—Larson





  1. Mr. President, our Government, above all others is founded on the right of the people freely to discuss all matters pertaining to their Government, in war not less than in peace, for in this Government the people are the rulers in war no less than in peace. CE




  1. Some years ago, on an eastern college campus, flyers were distributed with the names of male students randomly drawn from the student directory, with the label that they were potential rapists. Assume, for the sake of argument, that this is guerilla theater art. Were these flyers statements? Were they false statements? Were the reputations of the male students harmed? [...] Should we allow such statements, even if they are defamatory, if they are made by artists? How then should we decide who counts as an artist for this exception to the prohibition on defamation? AB




  1. I assure you, Frank, this enormous void is about to be filled up. Blank as it is, it has a singular fascination for me. Never has white paper possessed such a charm for me as this has, and I have already mentally peopled it, filled it with the most wonderful pictures of towns, villages, rivers, countries, and tribes – all in the imagination – and I am burning to see whether I am correct or not. AD




  1. Patterns in language offer a window on a culture’s disposition and priorities. For example, English sentence structures focus on agents, and in our criminal-justice system, justice has been done when we’ve found the transgressor and punished him or her accordingly (rather than finding the victims and restituting appropriately. A




  1. We do not see ourselves as victims. We will not be victimized. We have the right to be treated with respect, dignity, compassion and understanding. We have the right to lead fulfilling, productive lives -- to live and die with dignity and compassion. D

Multiple Choice: Choose the best of the answer options provided for each question. Make sure you read all of the options before making your final decision. Unless you are specifically told to mark all that apply, you should choose only one answer for each question.


  1. Which of the following authors use the strategy of asking questions and then answering them?

a. Patrick Henry and Boroditsky

b. Churchill and Bosmajian

c. Tannen and Kingsley

d. Anzaldúa and Spiegel

e. Larson and Ghiglieri and Myers







  1. Preston’s overall purpose is to _____, while Larson’s overall purpose is to _____.

a. entertain; inform about important historical events

b. call the audience to action in order to effect some real change; uncover the nature

c. inform about information the governments keep secret; warn about the dangers of sociopaths

e. warn about the dangers of bioterrorism; inform about the way historical circumstances allowed

of man

d. create fear in his audience; make the reader ponder the parallels, and question appearances



for seemingly impossible things to be accomplished







  1. _____ use of humor is usually whimsical, slapstick-like, or gallows humor, and is usually intended to offer comic relief, while _____ use of humor tends to be more ironic, often darkly so, intended to let the reader infer information or to highlight something disturbing.

a. Preston’s; Stanley’s

b. Larson’s; Callen’s

c. Anzaldúa’s; Churchill’s

d. Preston’s; Larson’s

e. Stanley’s; Van Camp’s







  1. Preston has frequently been accused of fear mongering, of stirring up fears that are generally unwarranted. In retrospect, who else might one accuse of something similar?

a. Kingsley

b. Boroditsky

c. Tannen

d. Stanley

e. Churchill







  1. Both Preston and Larson praise and celebrate individuals in their novels. However, the level of such praise varies. For instance, Preston praises ___almost without qualification, while his praise of ____ is somewhat more tempered. Likewise, Larson praises ____ quite unreservedly, while complicating his praise of ______ with some criticism.

a. Jahrling, Hensley; Burnham, Olmstead

b. Brilliant, Hensley; Harrison, Burnham

c. D.A. Henderson, Jahrling; Geyer; Burnham

d. Hatfill, Zaki; Olmstead, Geyer

e. Robert Stevens, D.A. Henderson; Root, Holmes







  1. In The Devil in the White City, Larson presents some of the scenes he describes as factual that later, in the notes, he explains are only speculation. Which of the following scenes DOES NOT fall into this category?

    a. Holmes’s murder of Julia

    b. Holmes’s murder of Anna

    c. Holmes taking Anna and Minnie to the stockyards

    d. Holmes’s courtship of Minnie

    e. Holmes’s execution scene


  2. In The Devil in the White City, what happens to Julia Conner?

    a. Holmes burns her body in his kiln

    b. He disposes of her in the pit of lye in his basement

    c. He gasses her and her sister to death in a trunk, and them buries them in a house in Toronto


    d. He has her skeleton articulated and sells it

    e. He abandons her and the child, and later attempts to divorce her, but never goes through with it




  3. The number and use of acronyms Preston notes in governmental agencies would probably make which two authors uneasy?

a. Tannen and Boroditsky

b. Bosmajian and Callen

c. Larson and Spiegel

d. Boroditsky and Anzaldúa

e. Callen and Van Camp







  1. Which of the following authors make use of a day-by-day structure that gives the work a sense of authenticity, as if it were based on journal entries of what happened at what time on what day?

a. Stanley and Callen

b. Boroditsky and Bosmajian

c. Kingsley and Tannen

d. Ghiglieri and Myers and Larson

e. Stanley and Preston







  1. Which authors work to combat a commonly held misconception(s)?

a. Kingsley, La Follette, Boroditsky

b. Preston, Stanley, Boroditsky

c. Preston, Van Camp, Tannen

d. Spiegel, Kerry, Ghiglieri and Myers

e. Larson, Stanley, Bosmajian







  1. In Through the Dark Continent, Stanley uses _____ in the exact way that _____ warns about.

a. dehumanizing language; Boroditsky

b. statistics; Anzaldúa

c. Christianity; Bosmajian

d. pronouns; Spiegel

e. metaphors; Tannen







  1. When discussing the argument about Kiva’s fate, Kingsley writes, “I explained to [the chief], that as the proceedings were taking place in his town he had a right of jurisdiction ipso facto.  The Fan could not translate this phrase, so we gave it the chief raw; and he seemed to relish it, and he and I then cut into the affair together, I looking at him with admiration and approval when he was saying his say, and after his ‘Azuna’ had produced a patch of silence he could move his tongue in, and he similarly regarding me during my speech for the defence.” This excerpt

a. reveals Kingsley’s need to be in control at all times, which frequently gets her into trouble

b. is an example of Kingsley’s clever wordplay that seeks to present the idea of cannibalism in a humorous way

c. closely parallels a similar scenario in Stanley’s work, although the ultimate outcome is rather different

d. shows how out of her depth Kingsley really is in Africa, and how little respect she has for the people and their customs

e. reveals Kingsley’s underlying racist feelings of superiority





  1. The following sentence from Stanley’s Through the Dark Continent is a ____ sentence, and this syntax ______.

“Yet after a moment's reflection, as I note the numbers of the savages, and the daring manner of the pursuit, and the apparent desire of our canoes to abandon the steady compact line, I give the order to drop anchor.”




a. simple and loose; makes it feel very immediate, as if you are in the boat with Stanley

b. complex and loose; makes it feel overwhelming, as there is so much to take in and clauses keep adding on, one on top of the next

c. compound-complex and loose; makes it feel hurried and chaotic, which matches Stanley’s mood

d. simple and periodic; lets us know right from the beginning what Stanley will have to do

e. complex and periodic; causes a long delay as we, too, take stock of the situation with Stanley before we see his decision





  1. ____ discusses freedom of speech with a focus on how it applies to _____; ______, on the other hand, focuses on free speech and _____.

a. Anzaldúa, culture; Van Camp, war

b. Spiegel, politics; Van Camp, social situations

c. Bosmajian, race relations in America; La Follette, war

d. Callen, discrimination; Anzaldúa, literature

e. Van Camp, art; La Follette, war







  1. Which of the following authors tend to phrase things in either/or terms, leaving no room for middle ground or compromise?

    a. Stanley and Boroditsky

    b. Bosmajian and Kerry

    c. Patrick Henry and Stanley

    d. Lincoln and Anzaldúa

    e. Tannen and Kingsley





  2. Which of the following exercise their right to freedom of speech in order to criticize a sitting president? [Mark ALL that apply]

    a. La Follette

    b. Bosmajian

    c. Anzaldúa

    d. Kerry

    e. Boroditsky





  3. These authors discuss a war where things look grim for the “good” side because it lacks the resources to effectively combat the enemy; however, the war _____ discusses is metaphorical, while the one discussed by_____ is a literal war.

    a. Callen; Lincoln

    b. Van Camp; Henry V

    c. Bosmajian; Kingsley

    d. Ghiglieri and Myers; Churchill

    e. Anzaldúa; Kerry





  4. Which authors rely heavily on the fact that most (if not all) of their audience is Christian? [Mark ALL that apply]

    a. Bosmajian in “Dehumanizing People and Euphemizing War”

    b. Bosmajian in The Language of Oppression

    c. Patrick Henry

    d. Lincoln

    e. Boroditsky





  5. Which of the following authors have been discriminated against and speak/write with a tone that betrays some actual anger over their treatment?

    a. Lincoln, Callen, and Bosmajian

    b. Bosmajian, Kingsley, and Patrick Henry

    c. Anzaldúa, Churchill, and Van Camp

    d. Anzaldúa, Callen, and Kerry

    e. Boroditsky, Callen, and La Follette





  6. Which two authors attempt to persuade their hurt or angry audiences to look at the opposing side in a different light, and to work towards understanding and tolerance, although the scale of the conflicts they address are very different?

    a. Boroditsky and Churchill

    b. Tannen and Lincoln

    c. Kingsley and Van Camp

    d. Anzaldúa and Preston

    e. Stanley and Bosmajian






  7. Consider the structure Preston uses in The Demon in the Freezer when the WHO is very close to eradicating smallpox in nature—when they are down to the last few outbreaks. What other work often relies on a similar structure?

    a. “How to Tame a Wild Tongue”

    b. “Over the Edge: Death in the Grand Canyon”

    c. You’re Wearing That?

    d. The Devil in the White City

    e. Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address





  8. In his speech, Kerry mentions his American Indian friend, but does not share the man’s name. Like ______, Kerry probably doesn’t share the man’s name because _______.

    a. Ghiglieri and Myers; he doesn’t actually know the man’s real name

    b. Spiegel, journalist-source confidentiality prevents him from sharing such details

    c. Callen and Tannen, the man is not a real person, but a hypothetical example

    d. Shakespeare and Patrick Henry’s biographer, the man is somewhat fictionalized, although based

    e. Tannen and Preston; he wants to protect the man from any negative reactions to his statement


    on a real person who probably did and said similar things

  9. What Kerry’s American Indian friend tells him about growing up on the reservation would make good evidence for the arguments made by

    a. Callen and Churchill

    b. Anzaldúa and Bosmajian

    c. Van Camp and Spiegel

    d. La Follette and Tannen

    e. Kingsley and Patrick Henry





  10. In the process of making their arguments, which of the following run the biggest risk of angering or offending their original audiences?

a. Callen, Tannen, and Patrick Henry

b. Kerry, Bosmajian, and Kingsley

c. Henry V, Boroditsky, and Van Camp

d. Lincoln, Anzaldúa, and Ghiglieri and Myers

e. Stanley, Spiegel, and Churchill







  1. Both ____ belittle themselves in their writing in order to set the audience at ease; however, the former does it so the readers do not feel embarrassed or ignorant while the latter does it to make the reader feel less frightened or intimidated.

a. Stanley and Henry V

b. Anzaldúa and Callen

c. Kingsley and Kerry

d. Patrick Henry and Bosmajian

e. Spiegel and Kingsley







  1. _____ argues scathingly that soldiers are fighting and dying in a “mystical war” against a concept, and that the language the government uses to discuss the war is misleading; _____ also argues that people are dying as a result of the government using misleading labels, although this time the war referenced is metaphorical.

a. Churchill; Anzaldúa

b. Kerry; Boroditsky

c. Kerry; Callen

d. Lincoln; Bosmajian

e. Lincoln; Van Camp





Read Lincoln’s “Gettysburg Address” below, and then answer the following questions.

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, upon this continent, a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that “all men are created equal.”

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived, and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that this nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate -- we can not consecrate -- we can not hallow, this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here.

It is rather for us, the living, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us -- that, from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they here, gave the last full measure of devotion -- that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain; that this nation, shall have a new birth of freedom, and that government of the people by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.


November 19, 1863

5

10

15



20








  1. In which of the following sentences does Lincoln use parallel syntax?

a. "The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here.”

b. "But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate -- we can not consecrate -- we can not hallow, this ground."

c. "We have come to dedicate a portion of that field as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that this nation might live.”

d. Both A and B

e. A, B, and C







  1. Lincoln's short speech begins, famously, with the words "Four score and seven years ago." (The word score comes from an Old Icelandic word meaning "twenty.") What famous document does Lincoln allude to in the first sentence of his speech?

a. Emancipation Proclamation

b. The Articles of Confederation

c. The Declaration of Independence

d. The United States Constitution




  1. In what portion of the long final sentence of "The Gettysburg Address" does Lincoln use epistrophe?

a. "we here be dedicated to the great task remaining before us"

b. "government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish"

c. "we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain"

d. "It is rather for us the living, to be dedicated here"




  1. When Lincoln opens the speech with “our fathers brought forth, upon this continent, a new nation, conceived in liberty” (2), he sets up a metaphor for the country. “Brought forth” and “conceived” suggest the reader see the U.S. as

a. a farmer’s field

b. a ship

c. a child

d. a reindeer




  1. Lincoln repeats several key words in his short address. Which one of the following words does not appear more than once?

a. nation

b. living

c. dedicated

d. freedom

e. dead







  1. The phrase "birth of freedom" in the final line of Lincoln's address calls to mind which similar phrase in the first sentence of the speech?

a. "all men are created equal"

b. "conceived in liberty"

c. "Four score and seven years ago"

d. "upon this continent"




  1. In lines 10-13, Lincoln repeats the word “consecrate.” This word has multiple connotations that we can begin to understand by thinking about the root word. From this root comes which other, related words that we might hear echoing in the background of this speech?

a. sacred

b. scared

c. sacrifice

d. second

e. A and C

ab. A and B




  1. In lines 16-18, Lincoln switches back and forth between the passive and active voice. Why might he have chosen to say “It is rather for us, the living, to be dedicated here” and then “It is rather for us to be here dedicated” when speaking in the first person, but then use the active voice, saying “they who fought here” when speaking about the soldiers?

a. He wanted to avoid responsibility for the war, and so speaks in the passive voice when in first person.

b. He lived hundreds of years ago, and there weren’t any rules about grammar back then.

c. He wanted to emphasize that the soldiers were heroes who did great deeds, while those like himself were passive observers.

d. He is a sloppy writer, and doesn’t pay attention to his grammar.




  1. “Fourscore and seven years ago” has a distinctive diction to it that mirrors the phrase “three score year and ten,” which was the “allotted span” of a human life, according to the Bible. Which of the following is an accurate statement about the phrase when taken in the context of the entire speech?

a. It suggests that the nation has outlived the life of one human, but prepares the listener for the end of the speech, which mentions a rebirth, or regeneration of the country.

b. It prepares the listener for the rest of the speech, which relies heavily on Biblical allusions, and uses the speaker’s familiarity with the Bible as a type of appeal to ethos.

c. It is an example of understatement.

d. It adds a sense of irony to the speech.




  1. In an earlier draft of the speech, Lincoln had written “The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, while it can never forget what they did here” in lines 13-15. Later it was revised to read “The world will little note nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here.” What is the effect of changing “while” to “but”?

a. The meaning remains exactly the same.

b. It adds a more pessimistic tone to the comparison.

c. “But” sets the two clauses are direct opposites. “While” suggests that the two clauses are parallel.

d. Using the word “but” allows Lincoln to use alliteration to make the sentence flow more smoothly.



Short Work Matching: Using the choices below, match the significant arguments, strategies, purposes etc. with their respective works. Answers may be used once, more than once, or not at all.


a. “Lost in Translation”— Boroditsky

b. Excerpt from You’re Wearing That?Tannen

c. Introduction to Language of Oppression &

“Dehumanizing People and Euphemizing War”—

Bosmajian

d.“AIDS: The Linguistic Battlefield”—Callen

e. “Our Use of Little Words”--Spiegel

ab. NEA Freedom of Expression article —Van Camp

ac. “How to Tame a Wild Tongue”— Anzaldúa

ad. Through the Dark Continent (excerpt)—Stanley




ae. Travels in West Africa (excerpts)—Kingsley

bc. Over the Edge: Death in the Grand Canyon (excerpts)—

Ghiglieri & Myers

bd. St. Crispin’s Day Speech—Shakespeare

be. Address to the Virginia Convention—Patrick Henry

cd. Second Inaugural Address—Lincoln

ce. Free Speech in Wartime—La Follette

de. We Shall Fight on the Beaches—Churchill



abc. Vietnam Veterans Against the War Speech—Kerry




  1. The author reveals that he/she/they work to overcome a deep-seated sense of shame connected to language AC

  2. Uses a scathing, mocking tone towards a large part of its audience in order to make them rethink their behavior BC

  3. Tells the story of Humpty Dumpty using a variety of languages in order to point out their differences A

  4. Criticizes the jokes and unscripted remarks of politicians C

  5. The author is a professor emeritus of speech communication from both the University of Washington and Stanford University whose emphasis was on public address and freedom of speech C

  6. The vast majority of the work is actually an explanation someone else’s theory and supporting evidence, not the author’s E

  7. A work that shocked the original audience because of its brevity and content CD

  8. The argument relies on appeals to pathos and a series of reversals that push the audience to see objectively negative things as positive instead BD

  9. The work’s evidence is comprised of anecdotal evidence gathered from others B



Short Essay Section (Wednesday Version): 50% of total exam grade
Read each question carefully. Then pick ONE and ONLY ONE question to answer. The essay should begin with a one or two-sentence thesis/statement of argument. This should be followed by detailed evidence from the texts and your own insightful analysis. You do not need an introduction or a conclusion, and your response may be in one big block paragraph. Remember to be as specific as possible, both in stating your claim and in providing evidence. Analyze in depth. Do not oversimplify, use broad generalizations, or simply rehash what we discussed in class. Show me that you read and understood the works and their nuances. I am looking for independent, original thought. Length will vary somewhat, but should be at least a page, single-spaced (if you write in big, loopy letters, expect to be writing far more than a page!).


  1. Read the excerpt from Ronald Reagan’s speech below, and then compare and/or contrast it to at least two other texts from this semester. Be sure to pay attention to subtleties and nuances of meaning, not just general ideas. It might be helpful to know that he gave this speech before the National Association of Evangelicals in Orlando, Florida, in 1983.

Yes, let us pray for the salvation of all of those who live in that totalitarian darkness–pray they will discover the joy of knowing God. But until they do, let us be aware that while they preach the supremacy of the State, declare its omnipotence over individual man, and predict its eventual domination of all peoples on the earth, they are the focus of evil in the modern world.

It was C.S. Lewis who, in his unforgettable “Screwtape Letters,” wrote: “The greatest evil is not done now…in those sordid ‘dens of crime’ that Dickens loved to paint. It is…not even done in concentration camps and labor camps. In those we see its final result, but it is conceived and ordered; moved, seconded, carried and minuted in clear, carpeted, warmed, and well-lighted offices, by quiet men with white collars and cut fingernails and smooth-shaven cheeks who do not need to raise their voice.”

Well, because these “quiet men” do not “raise their voices,” because they sometimes speak in soothing tones of brotherhood and peace, because, like other dictators before them, they’re always making “their final territorial demand,” some would have us accept them at their word and accommodate ourselves to their aggressive impulses. But if history teaches anything, it teaches that simpleminded appeasement or wishful thinking about our adversaries is folly. It means the betrayal of our past, the squandering of our freedom.

So, I urge you to speak out against those who would place the United States in a position of military and moral inferiority. You know, I’ve always believed that old Screwtape reserved his best efforts for those of you in the Church. So, in your discussions of the nuclear freeze proposals, I urge you to beware the temptation of pride–the temptation of blithely..uh..declaring yourselves above it all and label both sides equally at fault, to ignore the facts of history and the aggressive impulses of an evil empire, to simply call the arms race a giant misunderstanding and thereby remove yourself from the struggle between right and wrong and good and evil.




  1. Connect The Devil in the White City to at least one of the short works we have read this semester. Pick a short work (or works) that makes sense to compare and/or contrast. You might consider tone, audience, purpose, etc.




  1. Pick a rhetorical strategy and discuss how it is used for similar/different effects or purposes in at least two or three works we have read this semester. Explain in detail. At least two works must be from different units. You may NOT use appeals to ethos, logos, or pathos. Pick a different rhetorical strategy.



Short Essay Section (Thursday Version): 50% of total exam grade


  1. Many readers expect nonfiction works to be completely objective, unbiased accounts of facts and events, but this is rarely the case. Pick 2 or more works from this semester and make an argument about how and/or why nonfiction is often something other than totally “accurate” or “objective,” and why/if that matters.




  1. The text of Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address appears in the multiple choice section of this exam. Compare and/or contrast it to at least two other works from this semester. There should be a compelling reason to choose the works you do. Also, make sure that you do not simply rehash analysis touched on in the multiple choice questions.



  1. Connect The Devil in the White City to at least one of the short works we have read this semester. Pick a short work (or works) that makes sense to compare and/or contrast. You might consider tone, audience, purpose, etc.


Short Essay Section (Friday Version): 50% of total exam grade



  1. Read the excerpt from Toni Morrison’s 1993 Nobel Prize speech below, and then compare and/or contrast it to at least two other texts from this semester. Be sure to pay attention to subtleties and nuances of meaning, not just general ideas. It might be useful to note that Morrison is one of the most famous and well-respected modern African American authors.

“The systematic looting of language can be recognized by the tendency of its users to forgo its nuanced, complex, mid-wifery properties for menace and subjugation. Oppressive language does more than represent violence; it is violence; does more than represent the limits of knowledge; it limits knowledge. Whether it is obscuring state language or the faux-language of mindless media; whether it is the proud but calcified language of the academy or the commodity driven language of science; whether it is the malign language of law-without-ethics, or language designed for the estrangement of minorities, hiding its racist plunder in its literary cheek—it must be rejected, altered and exposed. It is the language that drinks blood, laps vulnerabilities, tucks its fascist boots under crinolines of respectability and patriotism as it moves relentlessly toward the bottom line and the bottomed-out mind. Sexist language, racist language, theistic language—all are typical of the policing languages of mastery, and cannot, do not permit new knowledge or encourage the mutual exchange of ideas.”


  1. Connect The Devil in the White City to at least one of the short works we have read this semester. Pick a short work (or works) that makes sense to compare and/or contrast. You might consider tone, audience, purpose, etc.




  1. Many readers expect nonfiction works to be completely objective, unbiased accounts of facts and events, but this is rarely the case. Pick 2 or more works from this semester and make an argument about how and/or why nonfiction is often something other than totally “accurate” or “objective,” and why/if that matters.



Linguistics Unit:

“Lost in Translation”— Boroditsky

Excerpt from You’re Wearing That?-- Tannen

Introduction to Language of Oppression &

“Dehumanizing People and Euphemizing War”—Bosmajian “AIDS: The Linguistic Battlefield”—Callen

"Our Use of Little Words”--Spiegel

NEA Freedom of Expression article —Van Camp

“How to Tame a Wild Tongue” — Anzaldúa


Rhetoric of War Unit:

St. Crispin’s Day Speech—William Shakespeare

Address to the Virginia Convention—Patrick Henry

Second Inaugural Address—Abraham Lincoln

Free Speech in Wartime—Robert La Follette

We Shall Fight on the Beaches—Winston Churchill

Vietnam Veterans Against the War Speech—John Kerry


TDITF Unit:

The Demon in the Freezer—Preston

Through the Dark Continent (excerpt)—Stanley

Travels in West Africa (excerpts)—Kingsley

Over the Edge: Death in the Grand Canyon (excerpts)—

Ghiglieri & Myers




The Devil in the White City—Erik Larson
The Great Gatsby—Fitzgerald (summer reading)

Essay Rubric:


100

Exceptional answer. Clear, sophisticated thesis. Original argument with specific, detailed support, and clear explanations. Observations are very perceptive. Does not focus on evidence or points that were discussed in class. Anticipates counterarguments. There is often an element of risk to these responses. They tend not to be “safe” answers.

95

Excellent answer. Clear, sophisticated thesis. Original argument with specific, detailed support, and clear explanations. Less perceptive than the 100s. Does not focus on evidence or points that were discussed in class. May not anticipate counterarguments as well as the 100s.

90

Very good answer. Clear thesis. Original argument with slightly weaker support, or not entirely original argument with fresh, new evidence. Does not focus on evidence or points that were discussed in class. Lacks the astute observations of the 95 or 100 essay, and may not anticipate counterarguments well, but strong writing nonetheless.

85

Good answer. Clear thesis. Original argument with fairly weak support, or a partly original argument with excellent support and some new evidence. May be somewhat weaker in explanations and prose, but still a solid response.

80

Adequate answer. Clear thesis. Partly original argument with good support and some new evidence. May be more general than the 85s, or answer may be more obvious. May be less focused. May need additional examples to really prove case. Writing may be noticeably weaker than the 85s or 90s.

75

Fair answer. Clear thesis. Makes a clear, logical argument that is supported by textual evidence. Evidence may be rather weak and/or may not be explained very well. Some evidence may have been discussed in class, but at least some new evidence or insight exists. Writing may be immature or marred by multiple grammatical mistakes.

70

Poor answer, but makes a logical argument and does include some textual evidence. Thesis may not be totally clear, or may really occur only at end of argument. Essay may be underdeveloped and/or poorly explained. Not all evidence may support argument well. Writing may be weak.

60

Problematic answer. May contain an illogical argument, factual errors, little to no evidence, or only rehash what has been discussed in class. May be mostly generalizations and unsupported claims. Thesis may be vague or may not exist at all.

50

and below



Seriously problematic paper. Major factual errors. Usually very underdeveloped or unfocused. May lack a thesis, evidence, or coherent argument. May summarize or offer personal response instead of the analysis and synthesis asked for.

Multiple Choice Score: ________


Essay Section Score: _________


Total Exam Score:_________


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