Expand healthcare interprofessional practice to include 11-15 community and neighborhood-based services throughout West Virginia



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Benedum Grant ID # 20130185 IPE Narsavage Attachment A

Approved Outcome 1:

Expand healthcare interprofessional practice to include 11-15 community and neighborhood-based services throughout West Virginia.

Actual Outcome 1:

All 15 projects meet Actual Outcome 1 and Interim reports are listed under Outcome 2 or Outcome 3 as appropriate to proposals funded:



Details of Projects:

2014 Claude A Benedum Foundation InterProfessional Education (IPE) Community-based Care grant

Sub-awards

#1) School of Public Health (SPH) Project Director Dr. Lauri Andress with co-director, Cindy Fitch, (WVU Extension) titled “Assessing the Capacity for Active Living and Healthy Eating” funded in the amount of $9985.60 with a start date of June 1, 2014. Collaborative interaction between public health faculty and WVU Extension Service nutritionists and extension agents involved public health and dietetics students in a project that provided the Monongalia County Regional WIC program with a programmatic, food access, and walkability assessment in six counties to evaluate the built environment in which WIC families reside so the Monongalia County WIC program may consider these issues in relation to their funding and retention strategies. They next will explore the presence of change agents among the WIC clients with the potential to address barriers and respond to retail food vendors via active engagement. (extended)

#2) School of Dentistry (SOD) Project Director Dr. Ashley Neuman with co-director Trisha Petitte, School of Nursing (SON), titled “Oral Cancer Screenings for the Underserved Population in Our Community” funded in the amount of $10,000 with a start date of June 15, 2014. They are working with students from the WVU School of Dentistry, WVU School of Medicine and WVU School of Nursing to educate clinicians and to provide oral cancer screenings to the underserved population at HealthRight in Morgantown, WV. (extended for financial report; final project report received)

#3) School of Nursing (SON) Project Director, Susan Pinto, MSN, RN (SON) and co-director Ashlee Sowards School of Dentistry (SOD), titled “IPE Oral Health Intervention at West Run Transitional Facility” funded in the amount of $10,000 with a start date of August 15, 2014. Developed/implemented programs to provide dental health exams & education to residents of West Run Transitional Facility. (extended)

#4) School of Medicine (SOM – Marshall University) Project Director Stephen Petrany, MD of the Department of Family Medicine, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, Marshall University with Co-Director James Becker, MD, adjunct Professor of the WVU School of Public Health (SPH) and Mr. K. Devlin, faculty in Psychology, working with students in medicine and social work, titled “Evaluation of Functional Health and Well Being of Patients in an Integrated Health Care Model using the SF-12v2” in partnership with the Ebenezer Medical Outreach, Inc. funded in the amount of $9,800 with a start date of September 15, 2014. To date they have 24 patients enrolled in the study who have completed their initial and two-month follow-ups (the study calls for follow-up intervention through six months).A team of physicians, residents, a social worker, psychologist, and research coordinators and assistants are implementing a mental health evaluation into a routine medical visit for patients at a free medical clinic in Huntington, West Virginia (extended)

#5) School of Medicine/Professional Programs (SOM/PP) Project Director Amy Burt, MOT, OTR/L of the Occupational Therapy (OT) Program, with co-directors, Ralph Utzman, Physical Therapy (PT) and Kimeran Evans (PT), Gina Baugh, School of Pharmacy (SOP), and Susan Coyle, School of Nursing (SON) working with students in OT, PT, Pharmacy, and Nursing, titled “Community Falls Prevention in an Assisted/ Independent Living Facility”, in partnership with “The Village at Heritage Point”, funded in the amount of $10,000 with a start date of September 15, 2014. Healthcare professionals /students in Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, Pharmacy and Nursing, are performing assessments and provide plans and education to prevent falls in older adults. Seniors living in apartments/assisted living areas in this senior housing facility receive one-on-one assessments, individualized program plans, and the opportunity to participate in weekly group activities for falls prevention. (final report received – used to obtain WV Higher Education Policy Commision (HEPC) $25,000 rural education grant)

#6) School of Medicine, Charleston Division (SOM-C) Project Director Dr. John Linton, AVP at WVU Charleston with co-directors Dr. Debra Young, Program Coordinator of the WVU School of Social Work-Charleston, in partnership with Dr. Cynthia Persily, CEO of Highland Hospital, titled “Inter-professional team development and implementation of an Evaluation Plan for an evidence based Sanctuary Model™ in a new Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facility (PRTF) for Children and Adolescents” funded in the amount of $9.989.20 with a start date of November 17, 2014. Teams are developing and implementing an evaluation plan to assess individual and organizational outcomes of a new Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facility at Highland Hospital to provide high quality, evidence based care for children and adolescents. (interim report submitted)

#7) School of Medicine (SOM) Project directors, Drs. Alan Ducatman (SOM/SPH) and Barbara Ducatman (SOM/Radiology), with co-director, Professor Beverly Kirby of the School of Medicine, Med Lab Sciences (MLS), titled “Translating Research into Improved Practice in Rural Access Hospitals” in partnership with Dr. Richard Wittberg working with Roane General Hospital, and Minnie Hamilton Health System funded in the amount of $10,000 with a start date of December 15, 2014. In two critical access hospitals, this team will support implementation of an evidence-based QI project designed to improve the accuracy of the Myocardial Infarction (MI) diagnosis by changing the laboratory tests ordered by physicians during evaluation for MI. Interprofessional faculty, and students from Medicine and Medical Laboratory Science and community partners will be involved. (Interim report submitted)

2015 Claude A Benedum Foundation IPE Community-based Care grant sub-awards

#8) School of Medicine (SOM/ education) Project Director Dr. Leslie Cottrell working with Co-Director Dr. Scott Cottrell in partnership with community agencies (Federally Qualified Health Centers – FQHC) identified by Dr. Cecil Pollard and Adam Baus (SPH) titled “IPE Health Sciences Research to Practice Scholars Program” funded in the amount of $9701 to support 2 to 6 student scholars for translational research to practice projects with a start date of January 15, 2015. The project team reviewed possible research to practice project proposals and identified the project that will be of focus in this year’s Scholars program. This proposal was submitted by Amber Crist from Cabin Creek Health Systems. Dr. Mathew Weimer from Valley Health in Milton, WV will lead the project and work directly with the project team, student scholars, and faculty mentors to complete the project: WV Alliance for Creative Health Solutions – Depression Screening in the Primary Care Setting (interim report submitted)

#9) School of Public Health (SPH) Project Co-Directors Dr. Michael McCawley, Professor in the WVU School of Public Health and Dr. Geah Pressgrove, PhD, from the WVU Reed College of Media working with community partner Mr. David Stover of the Wyoming County Courthouse, titled “Southern West Virginia Lifestyle (SWVL) Project” will design and execute tailor-made education and persuasion programs that support area residents in developing and maintaining healthy lifestyles. It will involve students from public health and media majors. Funding is in the amount of $10,000 with a start date of March 15, 2015.(interim report submitted)

#10) School of Public Health (SPH) Project Director Ranjita Misra, PhD, CHES, FASHA, Professor in the WVU SPH with co-director, Dr. Peter Giacobbi, WVU College of Physical Activity and Sports Science, in partnership with the United Methodist Church of Morgantown , titled “Translating Diabetes Prevention and Management into Appalachian Communities” will develop and pilot test evaluation tools in a workshop model to enhance student trainees with interprofessional education, interview and assessment skills, using qualitative and quantitative evaluation, of community-engaged diabetes program experiences. It has been funded in the amount of $9,928 with a start date of March 31, 2015. (report due December 2015 )

#11) School of Nursing (SON) Project director, Dr. Susan Coyle, with co-directors, Ms. Roberta Sykes, WVU School of Public Health and Dr. Treah Haggerty, Assistant Professor, WVU School of Medicine, working with community partners, Minnie Hamilton Health System, the Calhoun County Family Resource Network (FRN), and the Northern West Virginia Health Center (AHEC), titled “Calhoun County Interprofessional Rural Immersion Project” will be funded in the amount of $9951.00 with a start date of July 1, 2015. Interprofessional teams of faculty, students and community partners will develop a diabetes prevention social marketing campaign and develop, implement, and evaluate a youth-focused diabetes prevention program focused on healthy lifestyle behaviors. The recipients of the students’ work will be both the community at large and the young people of Calhoun County. (report due Dec 2015)

AWARDS from matching funds - Natalie and Wes Bush Inter-Professional Education Fund:

#12) School of Public Health (SPH) Project Director Dr. Lauri Andress, with co-director, Dr. Lesley Cottrell, (SOM) titled “Using EMS Resources to Reduce Re-Hospitalizations” in partnership with Richard Wittberg at Minnie Hamilton Hospital, funded in the amount of $10,000 with a start date of May 1, 2015. The team will evaluate models of post-hospitalization follow-up using Emergency Medical Services (EMS) to reduce the risk of re-hospitalization of transitional care patients by directing these non-traditional local resources to meet with the highest risk patients in their homes in order to assess progress. Dr. Wittberg will work with clinical and administrative staff at Minnie Hamilton Hospital (MHH), a rural critical access hospital, to gather data to help identify high-risk discharges and develop related training for EMS staff. (report due Dec 2015)

#13) School of Medicine/Professional Programs (SOM/PP) Project Director Amy Burt, MOT, OTR/L of the Occupational Therapy Program, Project Director submitted with co-director, Mr. J. Chris Haddox, Assistant Professor of Design & Merchandising in the Davis College of Agriculture, titled “Environmental Impacts on Healthcare Participation in Rural Communities”, in partnership with “The Center for Excellence in Disabilities” will involve students in Occupational Therapy and in Design in conducting focus groups with caregivers of children with disabilities, adults with disabilities, and healthcare providers, followed by data analysis to create informational/educational packets for healthcare facilities to increase healthcare participation by individuals with disabilities living in rural areas, such as West Virginia. It has been funded in the amount of $10,000 with a start date of June 22, 2015. (report due Dec 2015)

#14) School of Pharmacy/ Charleston (SOP-C) Project Director, Dr. Krista Capehart with co-directors, Dr. Ranjita Misra, Professor, WVU School of Public Health and Dr. Nilanjana Dwibedi, Assistant Professor, WVU School of Pharmacy, titled “Improving Diabetes Screenings Using a Community Pharmacists/ Public Health Partnership” will be funded in the amount of $10,000 with a start date of June 22, 2015. Interdisciplinary teams of faculty and students from the Schools of Pharmacy and Public Health will work with an established network of community pharmacists for diabetes risk assessment and referral that links primary care with community assessments and follow-up. Objective 2 will be to conduct a half-day workshop. Faculty from WVU School of Public Health and WVU School of Pharmacy (Morgantown and Charleston campus) will work with community pharmacists and graduate Public Health and Pharmacy students to present a workshop to enhance clinicians/pharmacists’ diabetes screening, assessment, and community referral skills. (report due Dec 2015)

#15) School of Pharmacy (SOP) Project Director, Dr. Gretchen K. Garofoli, with co-directors Dr. Kimeran Evans, WVU Physical Therapy Division, along with Dr. Susan McCrone, WVU School of Nursing, Dr. Sheila Price, WVU School of Dentistry, Dr. Neiman-Hart, WVU School of Medicine, Ms. Amanda Acord-Vira, Occupational Therapy Division, Dr. Gina Baugh and Dr. Ashley McMillan, WVU School of Pharmacy, titled “Keeping Healthy and Active in your Senior Years”, working with the community partner, Senior Monongalians Senior Center, will be funded in the amount of $9,419.80 with a start date of June 30, 2015. An interdisciplinary team of faculty and students from the Schools of Pharmacy and Physical Therapy will work with faculty from the WVU Schools of Nursing, Medicine, Pharmacy, Dentistry, and Divisions of Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy to provide interdisciplinary education and screenings for cholesterol, blood glucose, blood pressure, bone density, HGB &HCT, fall risk and car fitting. Education will include information on oral health and medications. A one-month follow-up after initial screening will provide screening results and recommendations. (report due Dec 2015)

Approved Outcome 2:

Develop interprofessional education and practice through care projects that respond to community-identified needs and build relationships among faculty, students, and community partners.

Actual Outcome 2:

#1) Project Director Dr. Lauri Andress with co-director, Cindy Fitch, titled “Assessing the Capacity for Active Living and Healthy Eating” in partnership with WVU Extension Service nutritionists and extension agents involved public health and dietetics students in a project that provided the Monongalia County Regional WIC program with a programmatic, food access, and walkability assessment in six counties to evaluate the built environment in which WIC families reside so the Monongalia County WIC program may consider these issues in relation to their funding and retention strategies. In 2014, as part of the IPE Benedum funding, The project involved The co-directors and two students from public health and dietetics. Discussion groups and assessments in six counties in West Virginia provided a sense of the WIC clients perceived issues that impact food access, nutrition, and dietary behavior in a rural food environment (Andress, 2015). Because of the number of issues that WIC clients must consider in order to access affordable, healthy food, the act of shopping was labeled a “juggling act”. This project also identified vendor-client relations as one of the significant factors associated with food access for the WIC clients (Andress, 2015). A manuscript is being written about these challenges and suggested changes needed. The project team requested to further explore the presence of change agents among the WIC clients with the potential to address barriers and respond to retail food vendors via active engagement. Therefore the project was extended through December 2015 with no additional funding needed. This team will report on the project at the IPE Speakers Series at 11:45 am on September 9, 2015.

#3) Project Director, Susan Pinto, MSN, RN (SON) and co-director Ashlee Sowards (SOD), titled “IPE Oral Health Intervention at West Run Transitional Facility” was developed and implemented. The program was designed to provide dental health exams and education to residents of West Run Transitional Facility. Because there was no dentist directly involved in the project, their original plan to apply fluoride varnish could not be implemented and was deleted from the project. Faculty and students from Dental Hygiene, Medicine, and Nursing went as a team twice a month for 3 hours and conducted face-to-face visits in apartments at the West Run facility. Oral assessments were completed for 20 residents over the months of February to June. The assessments identified 11 adults who had un-treated dental problems and referred them to free services for further dental care and follow-up. Details from the follow-up will be in the final report. June 16th was the final group education session with residents. The education provided at the site involved the “purchase” of hot spot time for data to allow the team to access on-line educational modules to review with participants. Post assessments of knowledge and practices were completed by participants, including students. The project culminated with a picnic for the resident participants and their families and about 28 attended. In order to completely process the data from the project, an extension was granted through December 2015.

#4) Project Director Stephen Petrany, MD of the Department of Family Medicine, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, Marshall University with Co-Director James Becker, MD, adjunct Professor of the WVU School of Public Health and Mr. K. Devlin, faculty in Psychology, working with students in medicine and social work, titled “Evaluation of Functional Health and Well Being of Patients in an Integrated Health Care Model using the SF-12v2” in partnership with the Ebenezer Medical Outreach, Inc. May 2015 Update: A team of physicians, residents, a social worker, psychologist, and research coordinators and assistants are implementing a mental health evaluation into a routine medical visit for patients at a free medical clinic in Huntington, West Virginia. The team has purchased the appropriate supplies for the grant project, has recruited providers from different health care fields, and had made strides in setting up the logistics of the project. They have actively recruited 24 patients and have modified their approach to reaching this difficult patient population in a way that is greatly increasing the reportable information to assess whether functional status is improved. The 24 patients have completed their initial and two-month follow-ups (follow-up intervention is through six months). A large portion of the grant has yet to be spent. As the project closes, they will make payments to patients and providers as budgeted for the project. They are hopeful this study will show the benefits and feasibility of integrated care from a multidisciplinary inter-professional approach when completed. As of May they were still actively recruiting patients into this six-month follow-up assessment of due to some initial difficulty reaching out to patients in this demographic (a free medical clinic). Therefore the project has been extended to December 2015.

#6) Project Director Dr. John Linton, AVP at WVU Charleston with co-directors Dr. Debra Young, Program Coordinator of the WVU School of Social Work-Charleston.in partnership with Dr. Cynthia Persily, CEO of Highland Hospital, titled “Inter-professional team development and implementation of an Evaluation Plan for an evidence based Sanctuary Model™ in a new Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facility (PRTF) for Children and Adolescents” has begun. The charge to the team was completed in December. Team development activities were begun in December with a “get to know each other” meeting, and a mini planning session for ground rules, meeting times, and future plans. The team charter was completed in January and approved by the team in February. The literature review was completed in May. The team has selected outcome measures, and at the July meeting, the actual measures were noted and are being ordered from vendors. The team is working on processes and policies for evaluation implementation with the Program Manager. A visit to a center using the Sanctuary model is planned for August, as is the consultant visit to the PRTF site at Highland. The team continues to meet monthly to debrief as a team. Most expenses will begin in the summer with travel and assessments. The IPE team is working well together, using each discipline and individual’s talents and skills to meet the team goals.

Projects initiated with outcome #2 focus– first report due December 2015:

#13) Project Director Amy Burt, MOT, OTR/L of the Occupational Therapy Program, Project Director with co-director, Mr. J. Chris Haddox, Assistant Professor of Design & Merchandising in the Davis College of Agriculture, titled “Environmental Impacts on Healthcare Participation in Rural Communities”, in partnership with “The Center for Excellence in Disabilities”.



Approved Outcome 3:

Create exemplars of interprofessional practice for health professions' clinical training which focus on the population being served and the community in which the service is provided.

Actual Outcome 3:

Completed Projects



#2) SOD Project Director Dr. Ashley Neuman with co-director Trisha Petitte, titled “Oral Cancer Screenings for the Underserved Population in Our Community” involved students from the WVU School of Dentistry, WVU School of Medicine and WVU School of Nursing to educate clinicians and to provide oral cancer screenings to the underserved population at HealthRight in Morgantown, WV. The team provided free oral cancer screenings for approximately 90 patients in the underserved population in Morgantown, West Virginia. An Assistant Professor in Oral Pathology from West Virginia University School of Dentistry was the director of the project, Dr. Ashley Clark (neé Neuman). A nurse practitioner, Professor Trisha Petitte, served as the interprofessional faculty component. Three dental students and one medical student participated: Mona Meky, Kenneth “Clark” Priddy, and Kayla Hudimac from West Virginia University School of Dentistry along with James Ohliger from West Virginia University School of Medicine. In addition, several other nursing and dental students were able to participate. The first screenings took place July 28, 2014 at HealthRight. Teams of 3-4 dental students and 1 of the 5 MSN (FNP) student went to HealthRight free clinic (Morgantown) on Monday evenings. Dr. Neuman demonstrated the oral screening techniques to the students on the first few patients and then the students began screening patients with Dr. Neuman doing a final screening on each patient to ensure that nothing was missed. A camera with a special lens designed to take close-up shots of different conditions/lesions found in patient’s mouths was purchased with the funding to be used at the clinic. The community partner was the Milan Puskar Health Right center; Laura Aliff, dental advocate, was our contact person. Laura Aliff, the Dental Hygienist from Milan Puskar HealthRight was usually in attendance at the screenings to provide continuity and follow-up for the patients if abnormalities were identified. In the Spring Semester 2015, screenings were also held at the dental clinic in the WVU School of Dentistry and were planned for Unity Manor in Morgantown. There were 5 nurse practitioner students who learned how to perform oral screenings which is not covered as extensively in the MSN curriculum. More than 80% of patients seen had some pathologic lesion present. Several non-cancerous lesions were identified and MPHR provided medications. The most commonly noted non-cancerous lesion was candida infections; nystatin or clotrimazole was typically prescribed. Three patients were discovered to have potentially cancerous lesions; these patients were referred to the school of Dentistry’s oral surgery department for biopsy and microscopic evaluation. None of the lesions proved to be cancerous; however, two were pre-cancerous and the lesional tissue was completely destroyed. Those types of lesions carry a 4% chance of undergoing malignant transformation; obviously these patients were helped as the tissue was able to be removed before any malignancy developed. We also provided comfort to those patients who were worried about a particular lesion becoming cancerous if the lesion was benign. Finally, one patient was misdiagnosed several times by other health-care professionals; we were able to accurately diagnose and therefore treat her erythema multiforme. For the patient population, ongoing care will be provided as the screenings became incorporated into the General Practice Residency rotation under Dr. William Marshall as planned for Fall 2015. The Social Determinants of Health objective was to provide care to populations who may not have access to oral cancer screenings, prevent pre-cancerous lesions from advancing into cancerous lesions, and treat routine oral conditions such as ulcerations, ‘cold sores’ and the like. The project team was able to accomplish this. The cancer screenings were available to anyone who was able to visit the Health Right center during times of the screenings – of the approximately 90 patients screened, 7 had abnormalities for follow-up (see below for final report sections). Although an extension to December 2015 was granted, the co-directors were able to complete the project and submit a final report on outcomes by August 2015; the final budget report is in process.

#5) Project Director Amy Burt, MOT, OTR/L of the Occupational Therapy Program, WVU School of Medicine, with co-directors, Ralph Utzman (PT) and Kimeran Evans (PT), Gina Baugh (SOP), and Susan Coyle (SON) working with students in OT, PT, Pharmacy, and Nursing, titled “Community Falls Prevention in an Assisted/ Independent Living Facility”, in partnership with “The Village at Heritage Point”, involved teams of students and faculty in providing assessments, plans to address problems, and education to prevent falls in older adults. Seniors living in apartments/assisted living areas in this senior housing facility received one-on-one assessments, individualized program plans, and the opportunity to participate in weekly group activities for falls prevention. A total of 31 residents from The Village/ The Suites at Heritage Point were screened by an interdisciplinary team. Each participant received a pedometer, night lights, File of Life, and fall prevention information from the CDC. There were 38 occupational therapy students, 39 physical therapy, 10 pharmacy, and one nursing student participating in the weekly screenings. Each week students participate in interprofessional rounding activities prior to the screening appointments. Equipment and home modifications were given to each resident as recommended by the occupational therapy environmental assessment. Equipment and home exercise programs were given to each residents as recommended by the physical therapy balance and gait assessments. Medication management strategies were discussed with the residents as recommended by the pharmacy medication checks. The nursing student observed the process for possible “care management” needs. Occupational therapy students completed weekly fall prevention groups on the following topics: microwave cooking, dance for exercise, tai chi, energy conservation, fall prevention awareness parts I and II, one bowl cooking, and relaxation. Each group was 1 hour and had 2-12 participants each week. Students were given useful fall prevention tools for their contribution to the project. A caregiver education night was completed by the pharmacy and occupational therapy students. Students had booths set up with information about fall prevention. There were 9 booths for the participants. This event was well attended by the residents and their families. Equipment/ prizes were given for participation. A staff education session was completed for the workers at The Village and The Suites. There were 30 participants. A 20 minute information session was presented by the pharmacy students on fall prevention. Equipment/ prizes were given for participation. Medication checks were also completed at Unity Manor. There were 6 residents screened. Equipment/ prizes were given for participation. A health fair was also completed at Unity Manor by the Pharmacy and Nursing students. Equipment/ prizes were given for participation. Pharmacy students completed follow-up phone calls with the residents to be sure all questions were answered, to discuss any changes made due to the screening information, and to clarify any unanswered questions. Response rate was low; about 5%, so surveys were mailed to residents to further assess outcomes – these data are not yet analyzed. Dissemination submitted to present at Physical Therapy APTA (pending), Occupational Therapy AOTA (pending), and Pharmacy AACP (accepted) meetings. All are posters on Interprofessional education aspects of this project. An accessible garden is still being built/ designed by the facility.

Interim Reports for Outcome #3:

#7) (SOM) Project directors, Drs. Alan Ducatman (SOM/SPH) and Barbara Ducatman (SOM/Radiology), with co-director, Professor Beverly Kirby of the School of Medicine (Med Lab Sciences), titled “Translating Research into Improved Practice in Rural Access Hospitals” in partnership with Dr. Richard Wittberg working with Roane General Hospital, and Minnie Hamilton Health System worked with two critical access hospitals to support implementation of an evidence-based QI project designed to improve the accuracy of the Myocardial Infarction (MI) diagnosis by changing the laboratory tests ordered by physicians during evaluation for MI. Interprofessional faculty and students from Medicine and Medical Laboratory Science and community partners were involved. The project began Dec 15, 2014. Traveled with students to two critical access hospital sites where they participated in presentations concerning the reasons and methods of proposed project in December and January 2015, with 3 in-person meetings with administrative and interdisciplinary leadership of these mid-Ohio Valley institutions in January and February 2015. Informal understanding for protocol implementation was reached with Minnie Hamilton and Sistersville hospitals. Assisted Minnie Hamilton and Sistersville to use our spreadsheet approach to summarize data, and assisted them to provide baseline rates of compliance with the nationally and internationally recommended guidelines for laboratory diagnosis of the “rule out MI” presentation. Initial baselines for compliance with national/international guidelines for the R/O MI diagnosis were completed in in April and May of 2015 for the two participating facilities. As with other WV hospitals (except for Roane), their baseline compliance is low and provides impetus for initiation of the project. Key data leaders and peer leaders at the collaborating hospitals wre identified. The project status was also presented as part of a broader Quality improvement initiative at the WV Choosing Wisely/Quality Conference held May 6, 2015, in Charleston WV and met federal officials potentially interested in the topic at a dinner held May 5, 2015. An additional, unanticipated benefit, stemming from (but not promised in) the activity proposal: The one facility that had already achieved their “R/O MI” lab orders goal, Roane General Hospital, expressed interest in working with us on reforming antibiotic ordering. Leadership there pointed out that the needs might interact with skill sets. That interest and subsequent dialogue led to a relationship with the WV Hospital Association’s initiative to monitor and improve the accuracy of antibiotic orders (starting with the inpatient setting.) This new and ongoing activity, has implications for patient care improvement, and for WVU work with the WV Hospital Association. The current status of the proposal is that the project is successfully underway and the baselines successfully established. The key competency to provide and analyze the project data are now in place at the participating hospitals. The remaining project tasks are to see if the participating hospitals can: Alter order sets (Peer feedback does not work if the wrong order sets are in place) and Use peer feedback based on dashboard reports of actual practice to improve laboratory orders. We anticipate that students from medicine and laboratory science backgrounds will provide different pieces of this knowledge base, and assist each other.

#8) (SOM education) Project Director Dr. Leslie Cottrell working with Co-Director Dr. Scott Cottrell in partnership with community agencies (FQHC or PCC) identified by Dr. Cecil Pollard and Adam Baus (SPH) titled “IPE Health Sciences Research to Practice Scholars Program” will support 2 to 6 student scholars for translational research to practice projects with a start date of January 15, 2015. The project team reviewed possible research to practice project proposals and identified the project that will be of focus in this year’s Scholars program. This proposal was submitted by Amber Crist from Cabin Creek Health Systems. Dr. Mathew Weimer from Valley Health in Milton, WV will lead the project and work directly with the project team, student scholars, and faculty mentors to complete the project: WV Alliance for Creative Health Solutions – Depression Screening in the Primary Care Setting. The Scholars program is proceeding as planned. Specifically, the project team has successfully developed an application process and materials for community-based primary care providers to outline their research to practice project ideas for consideration in this program. We have also developed materials to solicit student scholars and faculty mentors. Those processes will begin implementation by mid-summer. Regular team meetings (in person and via telephone) in this period are being used to guide the scholars. We propose to finalize the IRB for the project to enable publication.



#9) (SPH) Project Co-Directors Dr. Michael McCawley, Professor in the WVU School of Public Health and Dr. Geah Pressgrove, PhD, from the WVU Reed College of Media working with community partner Mr. David Stover of the Wyoming County Courthouse, titled “Southern West Virginia Lifestyle (SWVL) Project” are designing and implementing tailor-made education and persuasion programs that support area residents in developing and maintaining healthy lifestyles. It involves students from public health and media majors. The first objective was to conduct an assessment of each of the communities to determine the feasibility of executing a competition-based healthy lifestyle program in the local high schools. Surveys were distributed in seven different schools in southern West Virginia. These surveys consisted of nominal, ordinal, and ratio level data and were distributed in order to better understand the overall health practices of teenagers in southern West Virginia. These surveys will be used for pre and post analytics to measure the success of the SWVL campaign efforts in raising awareness and altering healthy behaviors in southern West Virginia. The completed surveys were sent through Fed-Ex and manually entered and analyzed through Qualtrics. The team distributed 400 surveys to various high schools but only 140 responses were recorded from four different high schools in southern West Virginia. These high schools include: Man High School, Logan High School, Tug Valley High School, and Westside High School. When asked about their gender 56% of respondents identified as male whereas 46% of respondents identified as female. The importance of health questions identified that 49% of respondents stated that being healthy was important to them, and 44% said that being healthy was very important to them. To compile an inventory of community resources (e.g. trails, community events, activity programs, popular restaurants, grocery stores) that could be incorporated into the communications and outreach plans, census data, including age, average income level and education level were reviewed. Additional research was conducted to determine community resources available to the residents in each county, such as exercise facilities, parks, and dining options. Furthermore, additional secondary research was conducted to determine best practices of health intervention campaigns that can possibly be replicated by the Southern West Virginia Lifestyles (SWVL) Project this year and in years to come. All of the counties studied were labeled food deserts. A food desert defined by the USDA as “neighborhoods and rural towns without ready access to fresh, healthy, and affordable food. Instead of supermarkets and grocery stores, these communities may have no food access or are served only by fast food restaurants and convenience stores that offer few healthy, affordable food options” (United States Department of Agriculture). With the lack of access to all of these resources, it can lead to poor diet, high obesity rate and heart disease. Research shows that the prevalence of obesity rate of children between the ages of 12 and 19 is at 18.4%. Teens between the ages of 12 and 17 are more likely to consume junk food at home, compared to children between the ages of six and 11. About one out of five teenagers say they order a healthy item when they eat out. Female teenagers, compared to their male counterparts are least likely to consume healthy food at home. They are most likely to consume junk food and to be confused about healthy food choices. Females are also more likely to see exercise as a chore. Although female teenagers consume more junk food compared to males, their male counterparts have a higher obesity rate with 18.6% compared to 15% while 89% of teenagers currently spend dining experiences with their family. Forty-seven percent of parents who have children between the ages of 12 and 17 say that the main reason for ordering out was that it was time effective. To meet the objective for collaboration between WVU faculty/students, Extension Agents and high school student leaders to determine the best incentives for participation and messaging, develop materials and initiate the healthy lifestyles program/competition in their high school, in-depth interviews were conducted with WVU extension agents in March, 2015 in order to better determine which counties the SWVL team should target for this year’s campaign. The purpose of these interviews was to identify extension agents in each county that would be willing to aid the SWVL team in all campaign efforts. Additional interviews were conducted with health intervention experts and individuals who worked on the SWVL campaign last year. These interviews were conducted to identify best practices of health intervention campaigns targeting teens and to assist with messaging and strategy. Second, the SWVL team traveled to southern West Virginia and held two focus groups with students at Logan High School and Man High School in Logan County. The purpose of these focus groups was to conduct some concept testing concerning the SWVL team’s potential ideas for the upcoming campaign, as well as get a better understanding of the student’s daily lives and activities. Third, questionnaires were distributed to potential participating high schools. These questionnaires anonymously measured the student’s thoughts. Throughout the Spring semester of 2015, the SWVL team focused on creating an engaging campaign that would alter the perceptions of healthy lifestyles in teenagers in southern West Virginia and build the foundation for a sustainable program as described in the interim phases below. The team identified four counties that will participate in the SWVL initiative, including Logan, McDowell, Mingo, and Wyoming County. Through primary and secondary research it was concluded that these students lack the basic knowledge to practice healthy behaviors. Additionally, the students have limited access to resources, such as health facilities, nutritional information and fresh produce. After identifying the four participating counties, it was imperative to establish relationships with community leaders, including WVU extension agents and administrators in the specified counties. Based on the success the pilot campaign, the SWVL team concluded it was best to continue the campaign through social media outlets, Twitter and Instagram. As a result, the SWVL team developed a social media based competition, as well as a student friendly pep rally for the winning high school. The foundation of the campaign has been developed so it can be executed efficiently in the Fall semester in November of 2015 by incoming capstone students.

Projects initiated with outcome #3 focus– first report due December 2015:

#10) (SPH) Project Director Ranjita Misra, PhD, CHES, FASHA, Professor in the WVU SPH with co-director, Dr. Peter Giacobbi, WVU College of Physical Activity and Sports Science, in partnership with the United Methodist Church of Morgantown , titled “Translating Diabetes Prevention and Management into Appalachian Communities”.

#11) (SON) Project director, Dr. Susan Coyle, with co-directors, Ms. Roberta Sykes, WVU School of Public Health and Dr. Treah Haggerty, Assistant Professor, WVU School of Medicine, working with community partners, Minnie Hamilton Health System, the Calhoun County Family Resource Network (FRN), and the Northern West Virginia Health Center (AHEC), titled “Calhoun County Interprofessional Rural Immersion Project” .

#12) (SPH) Project Director Dr. Lauri Andress, with co-director, Lesley Cottrell, titled “Using EMS Resources to Reduce Re-Hospitalizations” in partnership with Richard Wittberg at Minnie Hamilton Hospital.

#13) (SOM) Project Director Amy Burt, MOT, OTR/L of the Occupational Therapy Program, Project Director submitted with your co-director, Mr. J. Chris Haddox, Assistant Professor of Design & Merchandising in the Davis College of Agriculture, titled “Environmental Impacts on Healthcare Participation in Rural Communities”, in partnership with “The Center for Excellence in Disabilities”.

#14) Project Director, Dr. Krista Capehart (School of Pharmacy, Charleston), with co-directors, Dr. Ranjita Misra, Professor, WVU School of Public Health and Dr. Nilanjana Dwibedi, Assistant Professor, WVU School of Pharmacy, titled “Improving Diabetes Screenings Using a Community Pharmacists/Public Health Partnership”.



#15) Project Director, Dr. Gretchen K. Garofoli, School of Pharmacy, with co-directors Dr. Kimeran Evans, WVU Physical Therapy Division, along with Dr. Susan McCrone, WVU School of Nursing, Dr. Sheila Price, WVU School of Dentistry, Dr. Neiman-Hart, WVU School of Medicine, Ms. Amanda Acord-Vira, Occupational Therapy Division, Dr. Gina Baugh and Dr. Ashley McMillan, WVU School of Pharmacy, titled “Keeping Healthy and Active in your Senior Years”, working with the community partner, Senior Monongalians Senior Center




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