Dental Hygiene



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Dental Hygiene

The Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry and the University have combined forces to offer a 36 month accelerated Bachelor of Science Degree in dental hygiene. Pacific has created this distinctive three-year baccalaureate program (eight semesters including summer sessions) to attract highly qualified students. In addition to clinical practice, the baccalaureate hygiene degree allows entry into many positions in teaching, research, administration, public health, private industry, and other areas of dental hygiene practice, as well as eligibility for entry into advanced degree programs.



Mission

The mission of the University of the Pacific Baccalaureate Dental Hygiene program is consistent with the mission and educational goals of the University and the Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry.

The dental hygiene program will:

• Educate individuals who, upon completion of the program will be professionally competent to provide quality dental hygiene care in an evolving profession

• Provide patient-centered, quality care in an efficient clinical model that demonstrates the highest standards of service achievable

• Provide opportunities for community based, experiential learning

The program and its graduates will be distinguished by the following attributes:

• Continuous enhancement through professional development

• Humanistic values that respect the dignity of each individual and foster the potential for growth in all of us

• Application of theory and data for continuous improvement

• Leadership in addressing the challenges facing the profession of dental hygiene, education, and our communities

The Study of Dental Hygiene

Dental hygiene is a professional program where students learn to provide preventive clinical care for patients with emphasis on recognition, treatment, and prevention of oral diseases. In addition to performing a variety of preventive and therapeutic functions, the dental hygienist also has a major role in counseling and educating patients, community groups, and other health professionals. The curriculum helps students build the educational, communication, and clinical skills necessary for the dental hygienist to work in co-therapy with the dental team.



Facilities

The program is located on the University’s Stockton campus in a state of the art facility shared with Pharmacy, Physical Therapy and Speech-Language Pathology Programs, as well as the Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry’s newest Advanced Education in General Dentistry (AEGD) program. The AEGD clinic, staffed by dental residents and faculty, provides outstanding comprehensive restorative care and patient co-therapy experiences for both dental hygiene students and dental students on extramural rotation from the San Francisco campus. The University of the Pacific’s Health Sciences Learning Center and Clinics offers students an exceptional learning environment and the community an excellent resource for dental services.



Admission Requirements

Admission to the Dental Hygiene Program is competitive and based on merit. Students may apply either as a freshman student, doing pre-requisite coursework at Pacific, or as a transfer student, completing pre-requisites at another institution. After review of the completed application, the Office of Admissions will invite qualified candidates to participate in interviews on campus. In addition to a personal interview, applicants are invited to take part in orientation and financial aid seminars, meet informally with current students, and tour the campus. Admission will be based on the combination of application information and interview.



Freshman Application

The Freshman application deadline is November 15 for the following fall semester. Students are notified of their acceptance after March 15.

Recommended High School Preparation: Completion of high school or its equivalent is mandatory. Pass/Fail evaluations in required subjects are acceptable only when accompanied by a narrative transcript provided by the awarding school.

Required courses: Students applying to dental hygiene must take two years of high school algebra. Applicants are also expected to complete a college preparatory program. Preparatory courses are those in the fields of English, social sciences, foreign languages, mathematics and laboratory sciences,. High school physics is recommended.

It is strongly recommended, to all students applying to the University, that the following be included in the secondary school program: four years of English; at least three years of mathematics, including geometry and intermediate algebra; at least two years of a laboratory science in at least two disciplines (biology, chemistry, or physics); at least two years of the same foreign language; three years of social science; one year of fine or performing arts; and additional academic courses - all aiming at improving analytical abilities, promoting artistic development, and strengthening written skills.

Recommended Courses:

English 4 years

Fine Arts/Performing Arts 1 year

Foreign Language (one) 2 years

Social Science 2 years

Mathematics* 4 years

Laboratory sciences** 3 years

Academic Electives*** 1 years



*Suggested math sequence for science majors (including dental hygiene): algebra, geometry, algebra II, trigonometry or calculus.

**Physics, biology and chemistry are recommended for dental hygiene applicants.

***Academic elective courses should be advanced foreign languages, mathematics, laboratory science or other solid college preparatory courses.

GPA: Special emphasis is placed on coursework selected, the grades achieved in those courses, and the cumulative grade point average.

SAT or ACT Exams: The Admissions Committee will review the results of the student’s SAT or ACT scores.

Essay: An essay may be required of University applicants.

Recommendation: One academic recommendation on official letterhead is required. It should be from a science instructor, counselor or adviser. Additional letters of evaluation from health care professionals are recommended

Dental Experience: Job shadowing, employment or dental office observation are expected so that the applicant is familiar with the role of the practicing dental hygienist.


Extracurricular activities: Other factors considered (but not required) in selecting the class include: community service and involvement and volunteer activities.

Transfer Student Application:

Transfer application deadline for entry into the program is August 1 for the following spring semester. Applicants are notified by December 1.

Transfer students will be asked to meet the requirements listed above, with the following exceptions: SAT or ACT exam scores will NOT be required.

Sixty-three units of lower division college courses that are Pacific transferable and include the following prerequisites or equivalents are required:

• General Biology and lab (2 semesters or 3 quarters) must articulate to Pacific BIOL 051/061

• General Chemistry and lab (2 semsters or 3 quarters) must articulate to Pacific CHEM 025/027

• Microbiology (minimum of one 3 unit semester course or one 4 unit quarter class) must articulate to Pacific BIOL 145

• General (Introductory) Psychology (minimum of one 3 unit semester course or one 4 unit quarter class) must articulate to Pacific PSYC 031

• Introductory Sociology (minimum of one 3 unit semester course or one 4 unit quarter class) must articulate to Pacific SOCI 051

• Mathematics (statistics) (minimum of one 3 unit semester course or one 4 unit quarter class) must articulate to Pacific MATH 035 or 037

• English Composition (minimum of one 3 unit semester course or one 4 unit quarter class) must articulate to Pacific ENGL 025

• Communication (Speech) (minimum of one 3 unit semester course or one 4 unit quarter class) must articulate to Pacific COMM 027

• Anatomy and Physiology (one semester or 2 quarters) must articulate to Pacific BIOL 111

• Organic Chemistry (one semester or 1 quarter/ no lab) must articulate to Pacific CHEM 033

• One course that must articulate with Pacific General Education Category I-C Societies and Cultures Outside the United States

• One course that must articulate with Pacific General Education Category II–B Fundamental Concerns

• One course that must articulate with Pacific General Education Category II–C Practice and Perspectives in the Visual and Performing Arts or another II-B

Health Requirements:

Prior to entry into the professional portion of the program (final 4 semesters), health requirements must be met and documentation submitted to the University’s Cowell Wellness Center as follows:

• Medical Examination: Following acceptance for admission, submit the University’s “Entrance History and Physical,” form signed by a physician confirming that a medical examination was completed within 3 months of the date of matriculation into the professional portion of the Dental Hygiene program.

• Measles, Rubella (German Measles), and Mumps: Provide documentation of presence of positive titres. Documented vaccination with two dose series MMR given one month apart with live attenuated measles and rubella virus is adequate. A history of measles and rubella as childhood diseases is not sufficient.

• Tuberculosis: Submit the report of a two-step PPD tuberculosis skin test done within 3 months of entering professional program. With a history of tuberculosis OR a positive skin test, submit the physician’s report of a chest X-ray taken within the year prior to matriculation. Chest X-rays may be required at intervals, and suppressive medication may be recommended.

• Hepatitis B: Every student is required to submit documented proof of presence of antibodies to the Hepatitis B virus or to complete the Hepatitis B three-dose vaccination series and Hepatitis B antigen test at least one month after completion of series. It is recommended that this be done prior to matriculation; in all cases, however, it must be done before a student is allowed to treat patients which occurs in the first month of the program. If a student does not have documented proof of having antibodies to this virus, the vaccination series is available at the school for a fee.

• Tetanus Diphtheria Vaccination within past 10 years

• Varivax (Chicken Pox) Provide documentation of 2 dose vaccination series or presence of titer if history of having chicken pox.

Inquiries about health requirements and supporting documentation are handled through the University’s Cowell Wellness Center (209) 946-2315.
Program Description

The B.S. degree in Dental Hygiene is a professional program presented in an accelerated year-round format of eight semesters including summer sessions. Students accepted into the program as freshmen complete all sessions with the University. Transfer level program entrants, with prerequisites fulfilled, complete the final four semesters of professional coursework only.

In the first half of the program, prerequisite general education courses are presented to provide a strong science background, and a broad base in the humanities designed to strengthen dental hygiene science and clinical practice. Students will undertake this portion of their course work, which is provided by the College of the Pacific, with the general undergraduate student population on the main campus. The student must maintain a 2.7 GPA or better in lower division coursework to proceed into the professional portion of the program.

The professional portion of the program is a highly structured four semesters of upper division coursework including both didactic and clinical experience. This portion of the program is presented by the Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry Dental Hygiene Program on the Stockton campus.



Dental Hygiene Licensure

Completion of the program enables graduates to take national and regional or state licensure examinations. For California examination information contact: Dental Hygiene Committee of California 2005 Evergreen Street., Suite 1050 Sacramento, CA 95815, http://www.dhcc.ca.gov/ (916) 263-1978.



Degree Requirements

General Education Curriculum

First Semester (16 units)

Biology 051 (4 units)


(General Education III requirement fulfilled)

English 025 (Intro) (4 units)


(Gen. Ed. II requirement fulfilled)

Psychology 031 - Intro (4 units)


(General Education I requirement fulfilled)

Pacific Seminar 1 (4 units)



Second Semester (16 units)

Biology 061 (4 units)

Chemistry 025 (5 units)
(General Education III requirement fulfilled)

Sociology 051 (Intro) (4 units)


(General Education I requirement fulfilled)

Pacific Seminar 2 (3 units)



Third Semester Summer Session (16 units)

Chemistry 027 (5 units)

Elective (4 units)

Mathematics 037 - Statistics (4 units)

Organic Chemistry Chem 033 - without lab (3 units)

Fourth Semester (15 units)

General Education: (4 units)


(Gen. Ed. II, section b or c, requirement fulfilled)

Communications 027 (Public Speaking) (3 units)

Biology 145 - Microbiology (4 units)

Biology 111 - Anatomy and Physiology (4 units)



Total Units: 63 units

Dental Hygiene Curriculum

Fifth Semester (14 units)

Head & Neck Anatomy

Dental Anatomy

Oral Radiology

Oral Histology/Embryology

Dental Hygiene Practice

Pre-Clinical Dental Hygiene

Oral Health Education



Sixth Semester (17 units)

Medical & Dental Emergencies (Incl. BLS) I

Pharmacology

Dental Hygiene Clinic I

General & Oral Pathology

Periodontics I

Pain Management

Seventh Semester (17 units)

Medical & Dental Emergencies II

Dental Hygiene Clinic II

Biochemistry and Nutrition

Community Oral Health and Research

Patient Management/ Special Needs



Eighth Semester (17 units)

Periodontics II

Dental Materials

Dental Hygiene Clinic III

Ethics & Jurisprudence

Senior Project



Total: 65 units

Major Total: 128 units

Course Offerings

DHYG 110. Oral Health Education (1)

Students are introduced to principles and practices of prevention and control of oral disease. Oral health promotion, to include plaque control, patient education, and behavior modification are stressed.



DHYG 111. Head and Neck Anatomy (2)

This course is designed to expand student knowledge of the anatomical structures of the head and neck. Students examine clinical correlations relevant for dental professionals.



DHYG 112. Dental Anatomy (1)

The study of dental terminology, tooth morphology and the relationship of teeth in form and function to each other and to supporting structures. Root morphology, occlusion and dental anomalies correlated to basic clinical


applications.

DHYG 113. Oral Radiology (1)

This course is designed to examine the fundamentals of dental radiography to include history, principles, legal considerations, and radiation safety. Clinical applications including exposure technique, film processing, preparing and interpreting dental radiographs, and correction of technical error are performed.



DHYG 114. Oral Histology and Embryology (2)

Lectures, clinical examples, classroom discussions and slide materials designed to help student develop knowledge of oral histology and embryology, to be applied to the clinical practice of dental hygiene.



DHYG 115. Dental Hygiene Practice (3)

An introduction to the contemporary role of the dental hygienist, the evolving profession of dental hygiene, procedures and techniques utilized in the dental hygiene process of care. Emphasis is placed on development of a comprehensive medical and dental database and history, diagnostic tools, oral cancer examination, clinical systems and protocol, infection control, basic instrumentation and polishing, and patient communication.



DHYG 116. Pre-Clinical Dental Hygiene (3)

Provides the opportunity for application of the information presented concurrently in DHYG 115. Students practice infection control, vital signs, oral cancer examination, instrumentation and other clinical skills using manikins and student partners.



DHYG 118. Oral Radiology Lab (1)

Clinical applications of the concepts delivered in DHYG113 take place during the laboratory experience and include: radiographic exposure technique, film processing, preparing and interpreting film and digital radiographs, and correcting of technical errors.



DHYG 120. Periodontics I (2)

Introduction to periodontology. Emphasis is placed on etiology, histology and epidemiology, diagnosis and classification of periodontal disease. Principles of periodontal disease preventive therapy, treatment planning, reassessment and supportive periodontal therapy will be introduced. Students learn under which circumstances referral to periodontal specialty practices is appropriate.



DHYG 121. Pharmacology (3)

This course is designed to classify and study therapeutic agents commonly encountered and/or utilized in the practice of dentistry. Students learn chemical and physical properties, therapeutic effects, methods of administration, dosage, contraindications and side effects of these agents.



DHYG 122. Oral Pathology (2)

Study of etiology, pathogenesis, clinical and histogenic features of oral diseases. Recognition of basic tissue reaction and lesions that occur in the mouth, jaws, and neck and formulation of differential diagnosis of lesions seen in the practice of dentistry.



DHYG 123. Medical and Dental Emergencies I (1)

Students learn basic methods of medical and dental emergency prevention and management in the dental office. Emphasis on recognizing signs, symptoms, and treatment of the more common emergencies which may occur in the dental setting. Drugs and equipment utilized in the management of medical emergencies are outlined. Students are trained in Basic Life Support


Systems (BLS).

DHYG 124. Local Anesthesia/Pain Management (2)

Comprehensive information and skills for providing comfortable dental treatment. Local anesthesia and nitrous oxide-oxygen administration are explained and practiced.



DHYG 125/126. Dental Hygiene Clinic I (2)/(5)

This lecture/lab/clinic course is designed to provide students beginning clinical experience in the treatment of child, adolescent, adult, and geriatric patients. Promotion of oral health and wellness is stressed through lecture and clinical experiences in: patient assessment; dental hygiene care treatment planning; case presentation and implementation; and treatment outcomes evaluation. Principles, rationale and application of ultrasonic scaling are introduced. Cariology considerations and additional fluoride delivery options are discussed. Students integrate knowledge and skills developed in DHYG110 DHYG 115, DHYG 116, DHYG 120, and DHYG 124.



DHYG 130. Periodontics II (2)

This course is designed to enable students to enhance and develop knowledge and skills applicable in the treatment of patients with advanced periodontal disease. Concepts and treatment techniques of surgical and non-surgical periodontal therapy are stressed.



DHYG 131. Community Oral Health (4)

This course is designed to enable students to examine the principles and practices of oral health in diverse public health settings. Emphasis is placed on the role of the dental hygienist as an innovator and educator in community dental health programs with consideration to needs assessment, research study utilization, biostatistic application, program planning, and results evaluation. The social and professional responsibility of the dental professional with regard to public promotion of oral health and access to care is examined. Students design and implement a community–based research project that culminates in a class presentation and may be submitted in to the professional association’s table clinic competition



DHYG 132. Patient Management/ Special Needs (2)

This course is designed to enlighten the viewer to the world of people with special needs, the issues they face, the programs in place to help them, and dental treatment modalities.



DHYG 133. Medical and Dental Emergencies II (1)

This course provides a continuation of DHYG 123, Medical and Dental Emergencies I. Students review methods of medical and dental emergency prevention and management in the dental office. Emphasis on recognizing signs, symptoms, and treatment of the more common emergencies which may occur in the dental setting. Drugs and equipment utilized in the management of medical emergencies are outlined.



DHYG 135/136. Dental Hygiene Clinic II (1)/(7)

This lecture/ lab/ clinic course is designed to enable students to expand their experience in treatment of the periodontally involved patient. Students refine techniques for patient assessment, treatment planning, patient communication, full mouth scaling, and non-surgical periodontal treatment. Desensitization techniques, and pit and fissure sealants, are introduced. Utilization of radiographs, local anesthesia and nitrous oxide sedation in patient care is further developed. Students integrate knowledge and skills developed in DHYG 130, DHYG 132, and all previous course work to-date.



DHYG 141. Dental Materials (2)

This course is designed to examine structure and physical properties of dental materials utilized in the practice of dental hygiene. Emphasis on concepts and principles of clinical application.



DHYG 142. Ethics and Jurisprudence (2)

Students study ethical theories and issues related to the practice of dental hygiene and professionalism. A personal philosophy of professional conduct, continuous quality assurance and self-assessment is explored. Fundamental factors necessary to practice within existing regulatory frameworks are stressed.



DHYG 143. Biochemistry and Nutrition (2)

Basic principles of biochemistry and nutrition related to dentistry. Students complete patient dietary surveys and develop correctional nutritional plans.



DHYG 144. Senior Project (3)

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity for supervised practical application of previously studied theory in a variety of settings. Through outside program affiliation, faculty assistance, and mentorship, students choose a specific area of dental hygiene practice to explore in depth.



DHYG 145/146. Dental Hygiene Clinic III (1)/(7)

This course is designed to provide advanced clinical experience in performing treatment for a variety of clinical patient cases. Students use local anesthesia, nitrous oxide, oral antimicrobials, and nutritional analysis. State Board Examination requirements and protocol, are reviewed and simulated through practical exercises. Identification of an appropriate patient for licensure examination is made. Students integrate knowledge and skills developed in all previous course work to-date.



Dental Hygiene Faculty

Shelly Azevedo, Clinical Instructor, Department of Peridontology, BS, Loma Linda University, 1984,.MS, Touro University International, 2007.

Dorothy T. Burk, Associate Professor of Anatomy, BA, University of New Hampshire, 1972, PhD, University of Michigan, 1976, MA, University of the Pacific, 1994.

William M. Carpenter, Professor of Pathology and Medicine, DDS, University of Pittsburgh, 1964, MS, George Washington University, 1973.

Howard H. Chi, Assistant Professor of Dental Practice, BA, University of the Pacific, 1985, DMD, Temple University, 1989, MA, University of the Pacific, 2000.

Andrea Dickey, Clinical Instructor, Department of Periodontology, AS, Sacramento City College, BS, Loma Linda University, 2007.

Vicki Dodge, Assistant Professor Department of Periodontology AS, Fresno City College, BS, Northern Arizona University, 1976

Cathleen Dornbush, Clinical Instructor, Department of Periodontology, BS, University of Southern California, 1979 RDHAP, University of the Pacific, 2004.

Elena Francisco, Clinical Instructor, Department of Periodontology, BS, Loma Linda University, 1976, RDHAP, University of the Pacific, 2005.

June Harelson, Clinical Instructor, Department of Periodontology, AA, Diablo Valley College,BS, Northern Arizona University, 2006, MS, University of Tennessee, 2009, RDHAP, University of the Pacific, 2005

Lisa A. Harpenau, Associate Professor of Peridontics, BS, Loyola Marymount University, 1986, DDS, University of California, San Francisco, 1990, DDS, University of California, San Francisco, 1990, BS, University of California, San Francisco, 1990, MS, Baylor University , 1992, MBA, University of the Pacific, 1999.

Cezanne Hogan, Clinical Instructor, Department of Periodontology, BS University of Southern California, 2000.

Deborah Horlak, Associate Professor, Department of Peridontology, BA, Ohio State University, 1973; MA, California State University, Fresno, CA, 2003.

Tanya Jones, Clinical Instructor, Department of Periodontology, BA, Brigham Young University, 1982, RDHAP, University of the Pacific, 2004.

Kimi Kan, Clinical Instructor, Department of Peridontology, BS, University of the Pacific 2006.

William P. Lundergan, Professor of Periodontics, AA, College of the Sequoias, 1970, BS, University of California, Irvine, 1973, DDS, University of the Pacific, 1981, MA, University of the Pacific, 1994.

John Muller, Clinical Instructor, Department of Periodontology, BS, University of San Francisco, 1978, DDS, University of the Pacific, 1985.

Marlene Storz. Clinical Instructor, Department of Peridontology, BS, University of the Pacific 2006.

Paula Watson, Assistant Professor, Department of Periodontology, AA, Foothill College, 1990, BS, Chapman University, 2001, MS, University of New Haven, 2004, RDHAP, West Los Angeles College, 2003.


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