Australian Labour Market Update January 2015



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Australian Government, Department of Employment

Australian Labour Market Update

January 2015

Are you looking for a job in Australia?

The Australian Labour Market Update provides information on the Australian labour market on a quarterly basis. It is intended to inform people interested in working in Australia on a temporary or permanent basis.

Further information on job prospects, earnings and related information is at the Job Outlook website.

Unless otherwise stated, data are from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) Labour Force Survey, November 2014.1

Employment


Trend employment continued to expand over the year to November 2014, increasing by 13 500 (or 1.3%), although underlying labour market conditions remain soft. The current pace of trend employment growth of 15 400 jobs has improved over recent months, but remains below the recent peak of 19 400 jobs recorded in April 2014.

In line with the Australian Government’s latest Mid-Year Economic and Fiscal Outlook forecasts, the pace of employment growth is likely to remain subdued over the coming months, with the unemployment rate expected to edge up over the remainder of 2014-15.

Over the 12 months to November 2014, the largest employment growth (in trend terms) occurred in Tasmania (4.5%), Western Australia (WA, 3.2%), Victoria (1.6%) and New South Wales (NSW, 1.2%).

Employment opportunities and growth varied across industries. Over the 12 months to November 2014, the largest increases in trend employment occurred in Professional, Scientific and Technical Services (up 56 300), Construction (up 47 400), Accommodation and Food Services (up 40 300) and Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services (up 25 500). The largest decreases in trend employment occurred in Mining (down 43 000) and Public Administration and Safety (down 31 000). The strongest rate of employment growth was in Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services (up 13.1%) while the strongest rate of trend employment decrease was in Mining (down 15.8%). Employment growth rates by industry are shown in Figure 1.



Figure 1: Percentage change in trend employment by industry—November 2013 to November 2014

agriculture, forestry and fishing 4.8 mining -15.8 manufacturing -2.3 electricity, gas, water and waste services -8.5 construction 4.7 wholesale trade 0.3 retail trade 1.5 accommodation and food services 5.2 transport, postal and warehousing 2.0 information media and telecommunications 11.4 financial and insurance services -1.1 rental, hiring and real estate services 13.1 professional, scientific and technical services 6.3 administrative and support services -2.3 public administration and safety -4.1 education and training 2.5 health care and social assistance -0.4 arts and recreation services 9.9 other services 0.4

Source: ABS, Labour Force, Australia, Detailed, Quarterly, November 2014, ABS Cat. No. 6291.0.55.003.

ISSN 1833-413X

Unemployment



The trend rate of unemployment in Australia was 6.2% in November 2014 compared with 5.8% in November 2013.

In the past year, the trend unemployment rate increased in NSW (5.8% to 5.9%), Victoria (6.2% to 6.7%), Queensland (5.9% to 6.6%), WA (4.6% to 5.4%) and the Australian Capital Territory (ACT, 4.0% to 4.9%).

In November 2014, the trend unemployment rate was highest in Tasmania (6.9%), Victoria (6.7%), Queensland (6.6%) and South Australia (6.5%) and lowest in the Northern Territory (NT, 3.8%), ACT (4.9%), WA (5.4%) and NSW (5.9%). See Figure 2.
Figure 2: Unemployment rates (%) by
State/Territory—November 2014


state/territory/country trend unemployment rate (percentage) new south wales 5.9 victoria 6.7 queensland 6.6 south australia 6.5 western australia 5.4 tasmania 6.9 northern territory 3.8 australian capital territory 4.9 australia 6.2

Migrant Unemployment


The unemployment rates for people who migrate to Australia vary appreciably. Several factors influence migrant unemployment rates including skill level, age, English proficiency, recent and relevant work experience, and the period since arrival in Australia. Data consistently show recently-arrived migrants have a higher unemployment rate on average than those who have lived in Australia for some years.

Figure 3 below shows unemployment rates (average of the last 12 months to November 2014) for people resident in Australia born in selected overseas countries. People born in the UK and Ireland, Italy and the Netherlands have relatively low unemployment rates (3.9%, 3.9% and 4.3% respectively), while unemployment rates for people born in Vietnam and Lebanon are relatively high (8.8% and 8.0% respectively).



Figure 3: Unemployment rates (%) by selected countries of birth—12 months to November 20142

country or country grouping unemployment rate (percentage) at august 2014 (average of the last 12 months to august 2014) australia 6.1 netherlands 4.3 new zealand 5.8 italy 3.9 uk and ireland 3.9 greece 7.1 malaysia 4.5 philippines 5.6 germany 6.6 china 5.0 india 5.8 vietnam 8.8 lebanon 8.0 main english speaking countries (mesc) 4.7 other than main english speaking countries (otmesc) 6.8

MESC: Main English Speaking Countries3

OTMESC: Other Than Main English Speaking Countries

Employment by Occupation4


Employment growth is not the only factor influencing job prospects and it may be easier to obtain a job in an occupation which is experiencing strong employment growth than one growing only slowly or declining.

Over the 12 months to November 2014, the largest increases in employment occurred for Professionals (up 107 500), Managers (up 48 000) and Technicians and Trades Workers (up 47 000). Employment growth rates in descending skill order are shown in Table 1 below.



Table 1: Employment growth by occupation—12 months to November 20145

Occupational Group

1 Year Change (%)

1 Year Change (000s)

Managers

3.2

48.0

Professionals

4.2

107.5

Technicians and Trades Workers

2.8

47.0

Community and Personal Service Workers

0.8

9.1

Clerical and Administrative Workers

-1.3

-21.6

Sales Workers

1.7

18.7

Machinery Operators and Drivers

-1.6

-11.9

Labourers

0.1

1.1

Additional information on occupational groups is provided in the following section on internet vacancy trends.

Internet Vacancy Trends6


The Department of Employment produces the monthly Vacancy Report7, containing the Internet Vacancy Index (IVI)8 (see Figure 4). Over the year to November 2014, the IVI (trend) increased by 9.0%, with increases recorded in all of the eight occupational groups.

The largest occupational group increases were for Clerical and Administrative Workers (up 13.5%) and Community and Personal Service Workers (up 13.2%).

At the more detailed occupation level, vacancies increased in 40 of the 48 occupation clusters over the year to November 2014, with the strongest increases being for Construction Trades (up 37%), Farmers and Farm Managers (up 35.1%), Medical Practitioners and Nurses (up 28.4%) and Transport and Design Professionals, and Architects (up 27.2%). The strongest decreases over this period were for Engineers (down 12.4%), Food Preparation Assistants (down 6.8%) and Mobile Plant Operators (down 4.0%).

Over the year to November 2014, vacancies increased in all states and the ACT, and decreased in the NT (down by 9.3%). The strongest increases in vacancies were in the ACT (up 20.1%), NSW (up 16.8%), Victoria (up 9.5%) and Tasmania (up 9.2%).


Figure 4: Internet Vacancy Index, January 2006 to November 2014

month australian total (trend index) professionals (trend index) technicians and trades workers (trend index) january 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 february 2006 101.0 103.0 100.3 march 2006 102.3 106.2 100.3 april 2006 103.8 109.2 100.0 may 2006 105.1 111.4 99.5 june 2006 105.8 112.5 99.2 july 2006 106.0 113.5 99.5 august 2006 106.4 115.2 100.0 september 2006 107.3 117.3 100.8 october 2006 109.0 119.1 102.2 november 2006 111.4 120.9 104.1 december 2006 114.1 123.5 106.5 january 2007 117.1 127.5 109.5 february 2007 120.2 132.6 113.0 march 2007 123.0 137.2 116.3 april 2007 125.2 140.3 119.0 may 2007 127.1 142.2 121.3 june 2007 129.3 144.1 123.6 july 2007 131.4 146.0 125.8 august 2007 133.2 147.4 127.6 september 2007 134.6 149.0 129.4 october 2007 136.1 151.8 131.5 november 2007 138.0 156.0 134.3 december 2007 140.3 161.2 137.6 january 2008 142.5 166.0 141.1 february 2008 144.2 169.0 144.2 march 2008 144.7 170.2 146.5 april 2008 144.3 170.6 147.9 may 2008 142.6 170.2 147.5 june 2008 139.7 168.4 145.0 july 2008 135.6 165.3 141.0 august 2008 130.5 161.2 136.0 september 2008 124.5 156.4 130.2 october 2008 117.5 150.6 123.1 november 2008 109.7 142.8 114.6 december 2008 101.2 132.3 105.1 january 2009 92.9 120.0 95.6 february 2009 85.7 108.2 87.0 march 2009 80.2 99.1 80.4 april 2009 76.6 93.6 76.4 may 2009 74.5 91.1 74.4 june 2009 73.5 90.2 73.7 july 2009 73.4 90.2 73.8 august 2009 74.3 90.4 74.8 september 2009 75.7 90.1 76.7 october 2009 77.4 90.0 79.9 november 2009 79.2 90.7 83.7 december 2009 80.7 92.4 87.1 january 2010 81.9 94.8 89.5 february 2010 83.0 97.7 90.9 march 2010 84.2 100.5 91.8 april 2010 85.5 102.9 92.6 may 2010 86.7 105.0 93.9 june 2010 88.2 107.0 95.9 july 2010 89.8 108.9 98.6 august 2010 91.7 111.2 101.7 september 2010 93.9 114.2 104.5 october 2010 95.8 117.4 106.3 november 2010 97.3 119.9 107.3 december 2010 98.6 121.7 107.9 january 2011 99.6 123.0 108.8 february 2011 100.5 124.2 110.1 march 2011 100.7 124.8 110.8 april 2011 100.2 124.2 110.9 may 2011 99.3 122.5 110.9 june 2011 98.3 119.9 111.0 july 2011 96.9 117.3 110.7 august 2011 95.3 115.3 109.6 september 2011 93.8 114.1 108.1 october 2011 92.6 113.7 106.3 november 2011 91.9 113.6 104.9 december 2011 91.7 113.4 104.4 january 2012 91.5 112.8 104.3 february 2012 90.8 111.5 104.2 march 2012 89.7 109.9 103.7 april 2012 88.0 108.0 102.2 may 2012 85.6 105.6 99.0 june 2012 83.0 103.0 94.7 july 2012 80.9 100.6 90.9 august 2012 79.1 98.3 87.8 september 2012 77.1 95.4 85.2 october 2012 75.0 92.2 82.8 november 2012 72.9 88.8 80.2 december 2012 71.0 85.9 77.6 january 2013 69.7 84.0 75.4 february 2013 68.7 82.7 73.7 march 2013 67.8 81.3 72.4 april 2013 67.0 79.4 71.5 may 2013 66.5 77.5 71.0 june 2013 66.2 76.1 70.5 july 2013 65.9 75.3 70.2 august 2013 65.7 75.1 70.2 september 2013 65.5 75.1 70.5 october 2013 65.7 75.3 71.2 november 2013 66.4 75.8 72.5 december 2013 67.5 76.9 74.6 january 2014 68.3 77.8 76.5 february 2014 68.7 78.4 77.9 march 2014 69.2 79.1 78.6 april 2014 69.8 80.3 78.8 may 2014 70.7 81.7 79.3 june 2014 71.6 83.1 80.4 july 2014 72.5 84.0 81.6 august 2014 72.9 84.3 82.3 september 2014 73.1 84.0 82.4 october 2014 72.9 83.4 81.9 november 2014 72.4 82.7 81.1

Source: Department of Employment, Vacancy Report (November 2014), Trend Index data.

Future Job Openings


The Australian Jobs 2014 publication contains information on future job openings, which reflects the number of new jobs expected to be created over the five years to November 2018 and the number of openings likely due to workers leaving their occupation group for other employment or leaving the workforce. As there may be significant variation between and within states, information on job openings should be used with caution.

Job Openings estimates are indicative only and are intended to provide a guide to opportunities likely to be available over the five years to November 2018. It is important to note these estimates do not provide any guidance about how many people are looking for opportunities in each occupation. The Australian labour market can change quickly so information on the Australian labour market should be re-assessed prior to making a decision to lodge a visa application.

Queries on the Australian Labour Market Update publication should be emailed to migration@employment.gov.au.

Australian Government, Department of Employment



Australian Labour Market Update

Hot Topic

January 2015

Dental Practitioners


Dental Practitioners diagnose and treat dental disease, restore normal oral function using a broad range of treatments, such as surgery and other specialist techniques, and advise on oral health.i

This occupation has a level of skill commensurate with a Bachelor degree or higher qualification. Relevant experience and/or on-the-job training may be required in addition to the formal qualification (ANZSCO Skill Level 1).ii

In Australia, Dental Practitioners work with Dental Hygienists, Dental Prosthetists, Dental Technicians and Dental Therapists (which require skills commensurate with a Diploma, Advanced Diploma or Associate Degree (ANZSCO Skill Level 2)) and Dental Assistants (which require skills commensurate with a Certificate II or III (ANZSCO Skill Level 4)).iii

Labour Market Profile


Employment in this occupation has grown in the five years to November 2013 and employment is projected to grow strongly in the next five years to reach 16 800 in November 2018. Dental Practitioners are mainly employed in the Health Care and Social Assistance industry. Table A provides a labour market profile from the Job Outlook website www.joboutlook.gov.au.

Table A: Dental Practitioners—Key Labour Market Indicatorsiv

Key Indicator

Dental Practitioner

Occupation size (November 2013)

15 000v

Females

32.0%

Most common level of educational attainment

Bachelor degree (91.0%)

Median age

42 years

Full-time share of employment

60.4%

Average weekly hours (full-time)

38.4 hours

Unemployment rate

below average

Employment growth over past five years (to November 2013)

13.7%

Projected (to November 2018) occupation size

16 800

Recent labour market research by the Department of Employment suggests there is no shortage of Dental Practitioners in Australia (see https://employment.gov.au/national-state-and-territory-skill-shortage-information).

Regional Employment




Dental Practitioners are employed in all states and territories in Australia.

For the four quarters to November 2013, the average employment of Dental Practitioners was highest in Victoria (VIC, 28.0%), New South Wales (NSW, 26.2%) and Queensland (QLD, 23.8%).

The Northern Territory (NT), Tasmania (TAS), the Australian Capital Territory (ACT), South Australia (SA) and Western Australia (WA) employed the smallest number of Dental Practitioners. See Figure A (original data).
Figure A: Employment Distribution of
Dental Practitioners
by State/Territory to November 2013 (%)


state/territory percentage of the employed dental practitioners in australia who are employed in the particular state/territory (average of 4 quarters to november 2013; original data) new south wales 26.2 per cent victoria 28.0 per cent queensland 23.8 per cent south australia 5.7 per cent western australia 10.3 per cent tasmania 3.6 per cent northern territory 0.8 per cent australian capital territory 1.6 per cent


Skills Assessment


The Australian Dental Council (ADC) is the Australian assessing authority for Dental Practitioners. Individuals applying to migrate to Australia in this occupation must have successfully completed an assessment by the ADC of their qualifications and work experience prior to lodging a visa application.

The assessment process depends on whether an applicant has an accredited academic qualification in Dentistry from an ADC accredited Australian education provider, is registered in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada or New Zealand, or holds other overseas qualifications. A positive assessment or verification of qualifications for migration purposes is part of a three step process leading to registration as a Dental Practitioner in Australia.

The ADC performance standards apply to all individuals applying for registration as a Dental Practitioner in Australia from countries other than those outlined above. The following three steps outline the requirements for registration. Firstly, an individual must hold a university dental degree or diploma obtained after at least four years full-time academic study at an acknowledged university, or an appropriate qualification; and, have held full and unrestricted registration/licensure in his/her home country or country of training, and there has been no withdrawal of registration. Secondly, an individual must sit and pass an ADC written examination and thirdly, an individual must sit and pass a clinical practical examination.

Where applicable, individuals applying for registration as a Dental Practitioner in Australia will need to demonstrate in a single sitting, they have scored a minimum score of 7 for each of the four components (of listening, reading, writing and speaking) of the International English Language Testing System, or grades of A or B in each of the four sub-tests (of listening, reading, writing and speaking) of the Occupational English Test.

The ADC website (www.adc.org.au) provides more detailed information on the skill assessment process for Dental Practitioners, including provisions for applicants who completed their dental qualification from an Australian Approved Programme of Study in Dentistryvi or were awarded a general dental qualification from specified overseas countries and institutionsvii. This website also includes information on the skill assessment process for Dental Hygienists and Dental Therapists holding a relevant qualification obtained after at least two years full-time academic study, and with full and unrestricted registration/license in their home country or country of training, and there has been no withdrawal of registration.

Employer-Sponsored Migration


The Australian Government has several employer-sponsored migration programmes, including the Temporary Work Skilled, the Employer Nomination Scheme and the Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme. Information on these programmes is on the Department of Immigration and Border Protection website at www.immi.gov.au.

Seeking Employment in Australia


Dental Practitioners should note that neither acceptance of qualifications for migration purposes nor registration as a Dental Practitioner in Australia, assures employment in this or related occupations in Australia. Employment will depend on other factors such as the number of vacancies, skill needs in the Australian labour market, and suitability of an applicant for employment in a particular job in Australia.

The Department of Employment is not an employment agency and is not able to assist visa applicants or potential migrants to obtain employment in Australia. Australian employers are increasingly using the internet to advertise vacancies and websites of Australian professional bodies (which may recognise membership of affiliated overseas bodies) and industry bodies often include information on vacancies.



1 Data in the first and third paragraphs of the Employment section and data in the Unemployment section are from the ABS Labour Force Survey, December 2014.

2 Estimates for individual countries in Figure 3 may be subject to high sampling variability. Figure 3 uses original data.

3 MESC are the United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland, South Africa, Canada, the United States of America and New Zealand.

4 This section is based on ABS Labour Force Survey original data. Occupational Groups are from the Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO) (ABS Cat. No. 1220.0).

5 Source: ABS LFS, Department of Employment trend data

6 See Department of Employment, Vacancy Report (November 2014).

7 See Department of Employment Labour Market Information Portal website (www.lmip.gov.au).

8 The Internet Vacancy Index (IVI) is based on a count of online job advertisements newly lodged on SEEK, CareerOne and Australian JobSearch during the month. Duplicate advertisements are removed before IVI vacancies are coded by the Department of Employment to occupations based on ANZSCO. The data are seasonally adjusted and trended, then indexed (January 2006=100).

i Australian Bureau of Statistics and Statistics New Zealand, Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations, Cat. No. 1220.0, First Edition, www.abs.gov.au. A more detailed description is at www.ada.org.au In Australia, Dental Practitioner (ANZSCO Unit Group 2523) comprises Dental Specialists (including Endodontist, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon, Oral Pathologist, Orthodontist, Paedodontist, Periodontist and Prosthodontist) and Dentist (including Dental Practitioner and Dental Surgeon).

ii Department of Immigration and Border Protection, Australian Skills Recognition Information: www.immi.gov.au/Work/Pages/asri/dental-practitioners.aspx.

iii Dental Hygienists, Prosthetists, Technicians and Therapists provide supportive dental services in preventative and restorative dental procedures, and construct and repair dental appliances. Dental Assistants—which is not on the current Consolidated Sponsored Occupation List—prepare patients for dental examination and assist Dental Practitioners, Hygienists and Therapists in providing care and treatment.

iv For Table A, Dental Practitioner incudes Dental Practitioners, Dental Surgeons and Dental Specialists.

v The occupation size for Dental Practitioners at November 2014 is estimated at 10 400 (trend data).

vi Recognised Qualifications for Dental Practitioners (including Dentists and Dental Specialists), www.adc.org.au/index.php?id=13.

vii Migration Skills Assessment, www.adc.org.au/index.php?id=19.

Australian Labour Market Update—January 2015


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