August 2014 Commonwealth of Australia 2014



Download 0.98 Mb.
Page17/35
Date conversion15.12.2016
Size0.98 Mb.
1   ...   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   ...   35

Periodontics

What is a periodontist?


A periodontist specialises in the branch of dentistry that is concerned with the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases or abnormalities of the supporting tissues of natural teeth or their substitutes.31

How are periodontists trained?


A qualification in dentistry and a postgraduate qualification in periodontics, in addition to a minimum of two years general dental practice, are required to gain specialist registration with the DBA as a periodontist. Currently, there are four approved three-year Doctor of Clinical Dentistry in Periodontics/Periodontology programmes in Australia, offered by the University of Adelaide, the University of Melbourne, the University of Sydney, and the University of Western Australia. A fifth approved three-year Doctor of Clinical Dentistry in Periodontology programme, offered by Griffith University, will be offered from 2014.32

What is the assessment process for overseas-trained periodontists?


An overseas-trained periodontist must have their specialist qualification assessed as substantially equivalent to an approved qualification for the specialty. The ADC review and make recommendations about overseas-trained periodontist applications to the DBA.

In addition to having their specialist qualification assessed as substantially equivalent, the DBA’s Specialist Registration Standard requires specialist registration applicants to have completed a minimum of two years general dental practice in addition to meeting all other requirements for general registration as a dentist. The general practice requirement may be achieved by experience outside Australia, subject to assessment and approval by the DBA.33


What issues have stakeholders identified for the periodontist workforce?


Stakeholder feedback highlighted the current number of periodontists in Australia is adequate to meet demand, with supply exceeds demand in some metropolitan areas and difficulties experienced by new graduates in finding full-time work. There are some shortages in rural and remote areas, which stakeholders attributed to a lack of incentives to establish practices and specialist dental care programmes in regional areas.

In relation to workforce demand, stakeholders noted that demand for periodontists has been affected by the increased supply of dental hygienists and oral health therapists, who manage the preventative aspects of periodontal care. In particular, stakeholders highlighted demand for periodontists has slowed over the past ten years, with workforce supply increasing at a greater rate than demand.


Existing workforce position


The existing workforce position was determined from expert opinion from jurisdictions and the profession. A traffic light approach was used (as described in Appendix D). The periodontist existing workforce position assessment varied by sector and region:

Workforce characteristics


There were approximately 175 periodontists in Australia in 2011 and 2012 (Table 26). In both years, most periodontists worked primarily as clinicians, and approximately one-quarter were female.

Table : Employed registered specialists: periodontists, workforce characteristics, 2011 and 2012



Workforce characteristic

2011

2012

Number

177

179

% clinician

91.8

90.8

% female

22.6

26.1

Average age

48.8

48.4

% over 55

31.4

31.4

Average working hours

39.7

38.1

Full-time equivalent

185

179

Source: NHWDS: dental practitioners 2011 and 2012

Table shows the total number of employed dentists (both general dentists and specialists) who reported periodontics as their principal area of main job. The characteristics of these dentists is similar to those of the registered periodontist specialists (refer Table 26).



Table : Employed dentists (including specialists): principal area of main job reported as periodontics, workforce characteristics, 2011 and 2012

Workforce characteristic

2011

2012

Number

199

203

% clinician

88.3

88.6

% female

28.0

32.9

Average age

46.3

46.1

% over 55

27.8

29.7

Average working hours

39.4

38.0

Full-time equivalent

206

203

Source: NHWDS: dental practitioners 2011 and 2012
1   ...   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   ...   35


The database is protected by copyright ©dentisty.org 2016
send message

    Main page